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THE 

RICE INSTITUTE 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 




ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE ACADEMIC 

YEAR BEGINNING SEPTEMBER FIFTEENTH 

NINETEEN HUNDRED AND 

THIRTY-EIGHT 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

A UNIVERSITY OF 

LIBERAL AND TECHNICAL 
LEARNING 

FOUNDED IN THE CITY OF HOUSTON, TEXAS 

BY WILLIAM MARSH RICE 

AND DEDICATED BY HIM TO THE 

ADVANCEMENT OF LETTERS 

SCIENCE AND ART 

OPENED FOR THE RECEPTION OF 

STUDENTS IN THE AUTUMN OF 

NINETEEN HUNDRED 

AND TWELVE 



33Ffe 



/ 




THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

JAMES ADDISON BAKER: CHAIRMAN 

WILLIAM MARSH RICE, JR.: VICE-CHAIRMAN 

JOHN THADDEUS SCOTT: VICE-CHAIRMAN 

BENJAMIN BOTTS RICE: SECRETARY-TREASURER 

EDGAR ODELL LOVETT 

ALEXANDER SESSUMS CLEVELAND 

ROBERT LEE BLAFFER 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/riceuniversityge193839hous 



CALENDAR 



September 12-15 
September 15-16 
September 19 
September 21 
November 24-27 
December 14-21 
December 22 



I9JS 

Entrance Examinations 
Registration 
Opening of Courses 
Matriculation Address 
Thanksgiving Recess 
December Examinations 
Beginning of Christmas Re- 
cess 



January 3 
January 31- 

February 9 
February 22 
March 2 
April 21 . 
May 8-13 . 
May 22-June 2 
June 3-5 



1939 

Resumption of Courses 

February Examinations 
Washington's Birthday 
Texas Independence Day 
San Jacinto Day 
Entrance Examinations 
Final Examinations 
Twenty-fourth Annual 
Commencement 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

EDGAR ODELL LOVETT, Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

President 

HARRY BOYER WEISER, Ph.D. 

Dean 

SAMUEL GLENN McCANN, MA. 

Registrar 

JOHN THOMAS McCANTS, M.A. 

Bursar 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

THE NAME 

THE institution bears the name of the founder, the late 
William Marsh Rice. It aspires to university standing 
of the highest grade. Dedicated to the advancement of 
literature, science, and art, its educational programme of 
liberal and technical learning may justify the designation 
"Institute" as representing the functions of a teaching uni- 
versity and, at least in some of its departments, those of the 
more recent research institutions established in this country 
and abroad. 

BRIEF HISTORICAL SKETCH 

More than forty years ago several public-spirited citizens 
of the community asked Mr. Rice to bear the expense of 
building a new public high school for the city of Houston. 
This direct gift to the city's welfare Mr. Rice was unwilling 
to make, but a little later, taking into his confidence a half- 
dozen friends, he made known to them his desire to found a 
much larger educational enterprise for the permanent bene- 
fit of the city and state of his adoption. These gentlemen 
were organized into a Board of Trustees for the new founda- 
tion, which was incorporated in 1891 under a broad charter 
granting the trustees large freedom in the future organiza- 
tion of a non-political and non-sectarian institution to be 
dedicated to the advancement of letters, science, and art. 
As a nucleus for an endowment fund, Mr. Rice at this time 

[7] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

made over an interest-bearing note of two hundred thou- 
sand dollars to the original Board of Trustees, consisting 
of himself, Mr. James A. Baker, and the late Messrs. 
J. E. McAshan, E. Raphael, F. A. Rice, A. S. Richardson, 
and C. Lombardi. Under the terms of the charter, the 
board is a self-perpetuating body of seven members elected 
for life : vacancies since its organization have been filled by 
the election of Messrs. William Marsh Rice, Jr., Benjamin 
Botts Rice, Edgar Odell Lovett, John Thaddeus Scott, 
Alexander Sessums Cleveland, the late Edward Andrew 
Peden, and Robert Lee Blaffer. 

It was the unalterable will of the founder that the de- 
velopment of the work which he had conceived should 
progress no further during his lifetime. However, in the 
remaining days of his life he increased the endowment 
fund from time to time by transferring to the trustees the 
titles to certain of his properties, and in the end made the 
new foundation his residuary legatee. Upon the termina- 
tion of the long years of litigation which followed Mr. 
Rice's death in 1900, the Board of Trustees found the 
Institute in possession of an estate whose present value is 
conservatively estimated at approximately ten million 
dollars, divided by the provisions of the founder's will into 
almost equal parts available for equipment and endowment 
respectively. It may be remarked in passing that it is 
the determined policy of the trustees to build and maintain 
the institution out of the income, thus preserving intact 
the principal not only of the endowment fund, but also 
that of the equipment fund. While proceeding to convert 
the non-productive properties of the estate into income- 
bearing investments, the trustees called Mr. Edgar Odell 

[8] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Lovett, a professor in Princeton University, to assist 
them in developing the founder's far-reaching plans. Before 
taking up his residence in Houston, the future president 
visited the leading educational and scientific establishments 
of the world, returning in the summer of 1909 from a 
year's journey of study that extended from England to 
Japan. About this time negotiations were completed by 
which the Institute secured a campus of three hundred 
acres situated on the extension of Houston's main thorough- 
fare, three miles from the center of the city — a tract of 
ground universally regarded as the most appropriate within 
the vicinity of the city. 

Another early decision of the trustees of the Institute 
was the determination that the new university should be 
housed in noble architecture worthy of the founder's high 
aims; and upon this idea they entered with no lower 
ambition than to establish on the campus of the Institute 
a group of buildings conspicuous alike for their beauty 
and for their utility, which should stand not only as a 
worthy monument to the founder's philanthropy, but also 
as a distinct contribution to the architecture of our coun- 
try. With this end in view they determined to commit to 
Messrs. Cram, Goodhue, and Ferguson, of Boston and 
New York, the task of designing a general architectural 
plan to embody in the course of future years the realization 
of the educational programme which had been adopted 
for the Institute. Such a general plan, the work of Mr. 
Ralph Adams Cram, L.H.D., exhibiting in itself many 
attractive elements of the architecture of Italy, France, 
and Spain, was accepted by the board in the spring of 
1910. Immediately thereafter plans and specifications for 

[9] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

an administration building were prepared, and in the fol- 
lowing July the contract for its construction was awarded; 
three months later the erection of a mechanical laboratory 
and power-house was begun, and by the next autumn the 
construction of two wings of the first residential hall for 
men was well under way. In the preparation of prelimi- 
nary plans for its initial building operations the Institute 
enjoyed the cooperation of an advisory committee consist- 
ing of Professor Ames, director of the physical laboratory, 
and now president emeritus, the Johns Hopkins University; 
Professor Conklin, director of the biological laboratory, and 
at present professor emeritus and special lecturer, Princeton 
University; the late Professor Richards, chairman of the 
department of chemistry, Harvard University; and the late 
Professor Stratton, director of the National Bureau of 
Standards, subsequently chairman of the corporation of 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1911, on 
the seventy-fifth anniversary of Texas Independence, the 
corner-stone of the administration building was laid by the 
trustees. This building, the mechanical laboratory of the 
engineering quadrangle, the power-house, and the first two 
wings of the first residential hall for men were ready for 
occupancy at the beginning of the first academic year in 
the fall of 1912. The third wing of this residential hall, be- 
gun in 1 9 13, was first occupied by students in the autumn 
of 1914; while the construction of the physics laboratories 
and lecture amphitheatre, begun also in 1913, was com- 
pleted in the summer of 1914 from plans prepared by 
Messrs. Cram and Ferguson under the direction of Mr. 
H. A. Wilson, D.Sc, F.R.S., resident professor of physics 
in the Institute. In January, 1916, ground was broken 

[10] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

for the first wing of the second residential group for men; 
• the construction of this wing was completed by September, 
1 916. Further building operations were suspended during 
the war. In the meantime the athletic field house and 
other structures of the exhibition field were completed in 
1920. At the commencement exercises of 1923 ground was 
broken for the new laboratory for chemistry, the plans for 
which were prepared by Messrs. Cram and Ferguson and 
Mr. W. W. Watkin, associate architects, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. H. B. Weiser, Ph.D., resident professor of 
chemistry in the Institute. The construction of this labo- 
ratory was completed during the academic year 1924-25. 

The actual work of instruction of the first academic 
year began on the 23rd day of September, 19 12, the anni- 
versary of the death of the founder. In the presence of 
the trustees of the Institute, members of the teaching staff, 
and representative citizens of the community, the first 
class of students was received in the faculty chamber of 
the administration building with appropriate ceremonies 
on September 26th. The scholastic work of the first aca- 
demic year was limited to a single class of Freshmen of a 
standard of preparation as high as the best public and 
private high schools were capable of attaining. 

In the early autumn of 191 2, an academic festival in 
observance of the formal opening of the Institute was held 
under altogether favorable conditions of weather, most gen- 
erous cooperation of the community and commonwealth, 
and the heartening encouragement of several hundred 
scholars and scientists who came to Houston to assist in 
the launching of the new university. Chief among these 
distinguished representatives of life and learning were the 

In] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

twelve foreign savants who had consented to participate in 
the inaugural programme by preparing series of lectures 
in the liberal humanities of philosophy, history, letters, and 
art, and in the fundamental sciences of mathematics, 
physics, chemistry, and biology. A complete account of 
the proceedings of the four days devoted to this celebration 
has been embodied in three commemorative volumes, in 
which there appear, in particular, responses and addresses 
from many foreign and American universities and learned 
societies; addresses delivered by Governor Colquitt, of 
Texas, Chief Justice Brown, of Texas, and Bishop Gailor, 
of Tennessee; the inaugural poem of Dr. Henry van Dyke, 
of Princeton; the dedicatory sermon of Dr. Charles F. 
Aked, of San Francisco; and the inaugural lectures of 
Professor Rafael Altamira y Crevea, of Madrid, Spain; 
Professor Emile Borel, of Paris, France; Senator Benedetto 
Croce, of Naples, Italy; the late Professor Hugo de Vries, 
of Amsterdam, Holland; the late Professor Sir Henry Jones, 
of Glasgow, Scotland; the late Privy Councilor Baron 
Dairoku Kikuchi, of Tokyo, Japan; Professor John William 
Mackail, of London, England; the late Privy Councilor 
Professor Wilhelm Ostwald, of Gross-Bothen, Germany; 
the late Professor Henri Poincare, of Paris, France; the late 
Professor Sir William Ramsay, of London, England; Pro- 
fessor Senator Vito Volterra, of Rome, Italy; and Professor 
Carl St0rmer, of Oslo, Norway. 



[12] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FACULTY 1 

Virgil Charles Aldrich, BA. (Ohio Wesleyan), Ph.D. 
(California), formerly Teaching Fellow in Philosophy at the 
University of California; Instructor in Philosophy. 

Edgar Altenburg, Ph.D. (Columbia), formerly Assistant 
in Biology at Columbia University; later Instructor in 
Biology at the Rice Institute; Assistant Professor of 
Biology. 

Joseph Lloyd Battista, BA. (Michigan), MA. (Washing- 
ton Univ. and Harvard), Diplome d'Etudes superieures 
(Bordeaux), formerly Assistant Professor of Spanish and 
Italian at Washington University; Instructor in Spanish 
and Italian. 

Edwin Ford Beckenbach, Ph.D. (Rice), formerly Fellow 
in Mathematics at the Rice Institute and later Fellow of 
the National Research Council; Instructor in Mathematics. 

William E. Bennett, M.A. (Queen's, Canada), Ph.D. 
(Cambridge), formerly 1851 Exhibition Scholar of Queen's 
University, and Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge 
University; Instructor in Physics. 

Tom W T ilkerson Bonner, B.S. (Southern Methodist), 
M.A. and Ph.D. (Rice), formerly Fellow in Physics at the 
Rice Institute; later Fellow of the National Research Coun- 
cil; and Instructor in Physics at the Rice Institute; As- 
sistant Professor of Physics. 

Andre Georges Bourgeois, Bachelier es Lettres (Paris), 
Certifie d'Etudes superieures de lettres (Paris), Bachelier 
en Droit (Paris), M.A. (Texas); Instructor in French. 

1 Arranged in alphabetical order, with last appointment before 
receiving academic appointment at this institution. 

[13] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Hubert Evelyn Bray, B.A. (Tufts), M.A. (Harvard), 
Ph.D. (Rice), formerly Instructor in Mathematics at Tufts 
College, and, later, at Lafayette College; successively Fel- 
low, Instructor, and Assistant Professor of Mathematics at 
the Rice Institute; Professor of Mathematics. 

Grover Leon Bridger, M.A. (Rice), Ph.D. (Iowa State), 
formerly Instructor in Chemical Engineering at Iowa State 
College; Instructor in Chemical Engineering. 

Arthur Houghton Burr, B.S. (Worcester Polytechnic 
Inst.), M.S. (Pittsburgh), formerly Research Engineer in 
the Westinghouse Research Laboratories; Instructor in 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Carroll Camden, Ph.D. (Iowa), formerly Instructor in 
English at the State University of Iowa; Instructor in 
English. 

Asa Crawford Chandler, B.A. (Cornell), Ph.D. (Califor 7 
nia), formerly Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiol- 
ogy at Oregon Agricultural College; Instructor in Biology at 
the Rice Institute; later Research Associate of the School of 
Tropical Medicine, Calcutta, India; Professor of Biology. 

James Chillman, Jr., M.S. in Arch. (Pennsylvania), 
F.A.A.R., M.A.I.A., formerly Alumni Fellow in Archi- 
tecture at the University of Pennsylvania; Instructor in 
Freehand Drawing at the University of Pennsylvania; 
Instructor in Architecture at the Rice Institute; later 
Burnham Fellow in Architecture at the American Academy 
in Rome; Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

Robert Rae Crookston, B.S. in M.E. (Carnegie Inst. 
Tech.), formerly with the Westinghouse Airbrake Company 
of Pittsburgh; Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Max Freund, Ph.D. (Leipsic), formerly Assistant Lee- 

[14] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

turer in the German Language and Literature at Liver- 
pool University College; Royal Professor of German and 
Teutonic Philology in Queen's University of Belfast, Ireland, 
and Examiner in the Royal University of Ireland; later 
Professorial Lecturer in Modern English at the Universities 
of Giessen and Marburg, Germany; Professor of German. 

Joseph Stephen Gallegly, Jr., M.A. (Rice); Instructor 
in English. 

Allen Darnaby Garrison, Ph.D. (Rice), formerly Fellow 
in Chemistry at the Rice Institute under appointment of 
the National Research Council; later Instructor in Physical 
Chemistry at the Rice Institute; Assistant Professor of 
Physical Chemistry. 

James W. Greeley, B.S. in C.E. (University of Washing- 
ton), formerly Teaching Fellow at the University of Wash- 
ington; Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Clarence Albert Hall, B.M.E. (Ohio State), formerly with 
the General Motors Corporation ; Instructor in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Arthur J. Hartsook, M.S. (Mass. Inst. Tech.), formerly 
Instructor in Chemistry at the University of Nebraska; 
later Instructor in Industrial Chemistry at the Rice In- 
stitute; Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Claude William Heaps, B.S. (Northwestern), Ph.D. 
(Princeton), formerly Class of i860 Experimental Science 
Fellow of Princeton University; Instructor in Physics at 
the University of Missouri; Instructor in Physics and later 
Assistant Professor of Physics at the Rice Institute; Pro- 
fessor of Physics. 

Joseph William Hendren, Ph.D. (Princeton); Instructor 
in English. 

[15] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Gilbert Leslie Hermance, B.S. (Oregon), M.A. (Colum- 
bia), formerly Instructor in Physical Education at the 
University of Oregon; Instructor in Physical Education. 

Claude Edgar Hooton, B.S. in Arch. (Rice), M.A. (Rice), 
M.A.I.A., formerly Traveling Fellow in Architecture of the 
Rice Institute; Instructor in Architecture. 

Frank House Hurley, Jr., Ph.D. (Rice), formerly Fellow 
in Chemistry at the Rice Institute; Instructor in Analytical 
Chemistry. 

Joseph Estil Jones, B.A. (Indiana), M.A. (Chicago); In- 
structor in Spanish. 

Irwin Clark Kitchin, B.S. (Wake Forest), Ph.D. (Frei- 
burg), formerly Theresa Seessel Research Fellow in Biology 
at Yale University; Instructor in Biology. 

Floyd Seyward Lear, B.A. (Rochester), M.A. and Ph.D. 
(Harvard), formerly Instructor in History at Harvard 
University; later Instructor in History at the Rice Institute; 
Assistant Professor of History. 

Walter Leighton, Jr., B.A. (Northwestern), M.A. and 
Ph.D. (Harvard), formerly Instructor in Mathematics at 
Harvard University; later Instructor in Mathematics at the 
University of Rochester; Lecturer in Mathematics. 

Edgar Odell Lovett, Ph.D. (Virginia and Leipsic), Hon. 
LL.D. (Drake, Tulane, Baylor, and Bethany), Hon. Sc.D. 
(Colorado College), formerly Professor of Mathematics in 
Princeton University, and later Head of the Department of 
Astronomy in the same institution; Professor of Mathe- 
matics and President of the Institute. 

Jarmon Alvis Lynch, B.A. (West Texas State Teachers), 
Ph.D. (Chicago), formerly Scholar at the University of 
Chicago; Instructor in Education. 

[16] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Samuel Glenn McCann, Ph.B. (Wooster), M.A. (Rice), 
formerly Fellow in History at the Rice Institute; Instructor 
in Jurisprudence and Registrar of the Institute. 

John Thomas McCants, M.A. (Virginia and Yale), 
formerly Scholar at the University of Virginia and 
University Fellow at Yale University; later Instructor 
in English at the Rice Institute; Instructor in Busi- 
ness Administration and Bursar of the Institute. 

Alan Dugald McKillop, Ph.D. (Harvard), formerly In- 
structor in English at the University of Illinois; Instructor 
in English and later Assistant Professor of English at the 
Rice Institute; Professor of English. 

Heinrich Meyer, Ph.D. (Freiburg) ; Instructor in German. 

Walter Peter Miksch, M.A. (Stanford), formerly In- 
structor in French and Spanish at Reed College, and later 
Assistant in French at Stanford University; Instructor in 
French. 

John Marshall Miller, B.S. in E.E. (Kansas State 
Agricultural College) ; Instructor in Engineering Drawing. 

Winfred O. Milligan, B.A. (Illinois College), M.A. and 
Ph.D. (Rice); Research Assistant in Chemistry. 

Marcel Moraud, Agrege de l'Universite de France, 
Docteur es Lettres (Paris), formerly Instructor in French 
at the University of Minnesota and at Princeton University; 
later Associate Professor of French at the University of 
Toronto; Professor of French. 

Henry Oscar Nicholas, B.A. (Oberlin), Ph.D. (Yale), 
formerly Fellow and Assistant in Chemistry at Yale Uni- 
versity, and Instructor in Analytical Chemistry at Yale 
University; later Instructor in Chemistry at the Rice In- 
stitute; Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

[17] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Addison Stayton Nunn, B.S. in Arch. (Rice), M.A.I.A., 
formerly Fellow in Architecture at the Rice Institute; In- 
structor in Architectural Construction. 

Eugene Jean Oberle, M.A. (Stanford), formerly Instruc- 
tor in Romanic Languages at the Leland Stanford Junior 
University; Instructor in French. 

Frank Acklen Pattie, Jr., B.A. (Vanderbilt), M.A. (Har- 
vard), Ph.D. (Princeton), formerly Fellow in Psychology, 
Gordon Macdonald Fellow, and Charlotte Elizabeth Procter 
Fellow of Princeton University, and Fellow of the National 
Research Council at Harvard University; Instructor in 
Psychology and Tutor in the Division of Philosophy at 
Harvard University; later Instructor in Psychology at the 
Rice Institute; Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

David Morris Potter, Jr., B.A. (Emory), M.A. (Yale), 
formerly Southern Fellow of the Social Science Research 
Council, Bulkley Fellow in History at Yale University, 
and Assistant in History at Yale; later Instructor in His- 
tory and Government at the University of Mississippi; 
Instructor in History. 

Joseph Horace Pound, B.S. in M.E., and M.E. (Mis- 
souri), formerly Instructor in the School of the Westing- 
house Machine Company; Instructor in Mechanical Engi- 
neering and later Assistant Professor of Mechanical En- 
gineering at the Rice Institute; Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. 

George Holmes Richter, Ph.D. (Rice), formerly Fellow 
in Chemistry at the Rice Institute, and Fellow of the 
National Research Council at Cornell University; later In- 
structor in Organic Chemistry at the Rice Institute; As- 
sistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

[18] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Lewis Babcock Ryon, C.E. (Lehigh), formerly Instruc- 
tor in Civil Engineering and later Assistant Professor 
of Civil Engineering at the Rice Institute; Professor of 
Civil Engineering. 

Harry Alexander Scott, Ph.D. (Columbia), formerly In- 
structor in Physical Education at Columbia University, 
and Professor of Physical Education at the University of 
Oregon; Professor of Physical Education. 

Fred Vernon Shelton, M.A. (Rice); Instructor in 
French. 

Verne Franklin Simons, M.A. (Kansas), C.P.A., formerly 
Instructor in Economics at the University of Kansas, and 
later Assistant in Accounting at the University of Chicago; 
Instructor in Economics. 

John Willis Slaughter, BA. (Lombard), Ph.D. (Michi- 
gan), formerly Lecturer on Sociology in the School of 
Economics at the University of London ; Lecturer in Civics 
and Philanthropy. 

Joseph David Thomas, M.A. (Chicago); Instructor in 
English. 

Radoslav Andrea Tsanoff, BA. (Oberlin), Ph.D. (Cor- 
nell), formerly Sage Fellow of Cornell University; In- 
structor in Philosophy at Clark University; later Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy at the Rice Institute; Professor of 
Philosophy. 

Floyd Edward Ulrich, M.S. (Union), M.A. and Ph.D. 
(Harvard), formerly Instructor in Mathematics at Union 
College; later Assistant in Mathematics at the Rice Insti- 
tute; Instructor in Mathematics. 

Stanley Herbert Van Wambeck, B.S. in M.E. and M.S. 
in E.E. (Washington Univ., St. Louis), formerly Instructor 

[19] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

in Electrical Engineering at Oklahoma Agricultural and 
Mechanical College; Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

James Stephen Waters, B.S. (Rice), formerly Instructor 
in Electrical Engineering at the Rice Institute; Assistant 
Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

William Ward Watkin, B.S. in Arch. (Pennsylvania), 
M.A.I. A., formerly Scholar in Architecture in the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania; Associate Architect with Messrs. 
Cram and Ferguson, the supervising architects of the 
Institute; Instructor in Architecture and later Assistant 
Professor of Architecture at the Rice Institute; Professor 
of Architecture. 

Harry Boyer Weiser, M.A. (Ohio State), Ph.D. (Cornell), 
formerly Assistant Instructor in Chemistry at Cornell 
University; Assistant Professor of Chemistry in the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee; Instructor in Chemistry and later 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the Rice Institute; 
Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the Institute. 

Hugh Clayton Welsh, M.D. (Texas), F.A.C.S.; Instructor 
in Biology. 

Russell Eugene Westmeyer, Ph.D. (Iowa), formerly As- 
sistant in Economics at the State University of Iowa; In- 
structor in Economics. 

George Wesley Whiting, B.A. (West Virginia), M.A. 
(Harvard), Ph.D. (Chicago), formerly Assistant Professor 
of English at the Michigan State College, and later Assist- 
ant in English at the University of Chicago; Instructor in 
English. 

George Guion Williams, M.A. (Rice), formerly Instructor 
in English at the Rice Institute; later Teaching Fellow in 
English in New York University; Instructor in English. 

[20] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Harold Albert Wilson, F.R.S., M.A. (Cambridge), M.Sc. 
(Victoria), D.Sc. (London), formerly 1851 Exhibition 
Scholar of Leeds University; Allen Scholar and Clerk 
Maxwell Student of Cambridge University; Scholar in 
Physics of London University; Fellow of Trinity College, 
Cambridge University; Professor of Physics in King's Col- 
lege, London; Professor of Physics in McGill University; 
Professor of Physics at the Rice Institute; later Professor 
of Natural Philosophy in the University of Glasgow; 
Professor of Physics. 

ASSISTANTS AND FELLOWS 

John Bertram Bates, B.S. in Chem. (Clarkson Coll. of 
Tech.) ; Fellow in Chemistry. 

Emmett Evander Brunson, B.A. (Rice), M.A. (Colum- 
bia) ; Assistant in Physical Education. 

Weldon Burk Cabaniss, B.A. (Rice); Assistant in Juris- 
prudence. 

William Joseph Coppoc, B.S. (Ottawa), M.A. (Rice); 
Fellow in Chemistry. 

Harry William Crate, B.S. in Arch. (Rice) ; Fellow in 
Architecture. 

Joseph Ilott Davies, Ph.D. (Rice) ; Assistant in Biology. 

Alice Crowell Dean, M.A. (Rice) ; Fellow in Mathematics. 

James Fred Denton, M.S. (Georgia), formerly Instructor 
in Zoology at the University of Georgia; Fellow in Biology. 

Price Bush Elkin, B.A. (Harvard) ; Fellow in Chemistry. 

Julian Frank Evans, M.S. (Oklahoma) ; Fellow in Physics. 

Marshall DeMotte Gates, B.S. in Ch.E. (Rice); Fellow 
in Chemistry. 

[21] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Lee Hodges, B.S. (Harvard), M.A. (Rice); Assistant in 
French and Spanish. 

Emmett Leroy Hudspeth, M.A. (Rice); Assistant in 
Physics. 

Charles Joseph Kopriva, M.A. (Minnesota), formerly 
Assistant in English at the University of Minnesota; Assist- 
ant in English. 

Malcolm Thomas McCants, B.A. (Rice) ; Fellow in Chem- 
istry. 

Eby Nell McElrath, M.A. (Rice); Fellow in Chemistry. 

Andrew Wetherbee McReynolds, B.A. (Rice) ; Fellow in 
Physics. 

William Mozart McVey, Assistant in Architecture. 

Nat Huyler Marsh, B.A. (Rice); Fellow in Chemistry. 

Mary Emily Miller, B.A. (Rice); Fellow in Chemistry. 

Simon Miron, M.A. (Rice); Fellow in Chemistry. 

John Purcell Nash, M.A. (California); Samuel Fain 
Carter Fellow in Mathematics. 

Edward Preble Offutt, Jr., B.A. (Dartmouth); Fellow in 
Biology. 

Maxwell Ossian Reade, B.A. (Brooklyn), M.A. (Har- 
vard); Fellow in Mathematics. 

Fred Terry Rogers, Jr., M.A. (Rice) ; Assistant in Physics. 

Marguerite Moilliet Rogers, M.A. (Rice); Fellow in 
Physics. 

James Curtiss Schiller, B.A. (Rice) ; Fellow in Chemistry. 

Meredith Morgan Sparks, B.A. (Rice) ; Fellow in Chem- 
istry. 

Karl Cornelius ten Brink, B.S. in Ch.E. (Rice); Fellow 
in Chemistry. 

[22] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

While seeking to develop its students in character, in 
culture, and in citizenship, the Rice Institute will reserve 
for scholarship its highest rewards and in particular for 
evidences of creative capacity in productive scholarship. 
To encourage this devotion to learning there have been 
devised through the donations of friends of the Institute 
a number of undergraduate scholarships to be awarded 
preferably to those students who have been in residence 
at the Institute for at least one year. Moreover, honorary 
scholarships without stipend may be granted to students 
whose scholastic standing shows marked ability. 

The Graham Baker Studentship 

The first of these undergraduate scholarships to be estab- 
lished at the Institute is the Graham Baker Studentship, 
founded by Captain and the late Mrs. James A. Baker, of 
Houston, in memory of their eldest son, the late Frank 
Graham Baker. This studentship is awarded annually to a 
student of the Rice Institute upon the basis of highest 
standing in scholarship, and the holder is known as the 
Graham Baker Student for the year. The award is an- 
nounced at the commencement convocation in June, and the 
annual stipend is $175. The first award was made for the 
academic year 1918-19. 

The Hohenthal Scholarships 

The Hohenthal Scholarship Fund is a gift to the Rice 
Institute made through the good offices of Mr. William 
M. Rice, Jr., from the estate of the late Lionel Hohenthal, 

[23] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

of Houston, who in his last will and testament instructed 
his executor, Mr. Rice, to devote the residue of his estate 
to the founding of a permanent memorial to Mr. Hohen- 
thal's mother, father, and brother. The scholarships 
provided by this fund are known as the Hohenthal Scholar- 
ships, and the holders as the Hohenthal Scholars of the 
Institute. These scholarships are awarded annually to stu- 
dents of high standing in scholarship who are earning a 
substantial part of their college expenses. Each of the six 
now available carries with it an annual stipend of $1 16.66. 
The first awards were made for the academic year 191 8- 19. 

The D.A.R. Scholarship 

The John McKnitt Alexander Chapter of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution has provided an endowed 
undergraduate scholarship at the Rice Institute. Under 
the present conditions of this scholarship it is awarded to 
a young woman student on admission to the Institute and 
carries with it an annual stipend of $175. The first award 
was made for the academic year 1919-20. 

The Ellen Axson Wilson Scholarship 

The Axson Club, an organization of Houston women in 
the interests of literary pursuits, recently concluded a 
successful campaign for the endowment of a permanent 
scholarship at the Rice Institute in memory of Ellen 
Axson Wilson (the late Mrs. Woodrow Wilson), the scholar- 
ship to be awarded from year to year to a young woman 
student of the Institute. The annual stipend of the Ellen 
Axson Wilson Scholarship is $350, and the first award of 
the scholarship was made for the academic year 1922-23. 

[24] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



The Elizabeth Baldwin Literary Society Scholarship 

The Elizabeth Baldwin Literary Society of the Rice 
Institute is maintaining annually a scholarship with a view to 
providing permanent endowment therefor. This scholarship 
is available to a student of the Rice Institute, either a young 
man or a young woman, the candidate to be chosen by the 
Faculty on grounds of scholarship, personality, and physical 
vigor. The present annual stipend of the Elizabeth Baldwin 
Literary Society Scholarship is $300, and the first award of 
the scholarship was made for the academic year 1926-27. 

The Pallas Athene Literary Society Scholarship 

The Pallas Athene Literary Society of the Rice Institute 
is providing an annual scholarship at the Rice Institute, 
with the intention of raising a permanent endowment for 
the scholarship. This scholarship is open to a young 
woman student of the Rice Institute, to be selected by the 
Faculty on grounds of scholarship, personality, and physical 
vigor. The present annual stipend of the Pallas Athene 
Literary Society Scholarship is $300, and the first award of 
the scholarship was made for the academic year 1926-27. 

The Daniel Ripley Scholarship 

In memory of her husband, the late Daniel Ripley, for 
many years a prominent citizen of Houston, Mrs. Edith 
Ripley established by the donation to the Institute of 
$10,000, the Daniel Ripley Scholarship. The annual 
income of this trust fund is to be awarded to that self- 
supporting young man or woman student completing the 
Freshman year at the Rice Institute who receives the high- 

[25] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

est grades, and the candidate is to be selected by the Faculty. 
The first award of the Daniel Ripley Scholarship was made 
for the academic year 1927-28. 

The Junior Engineering Scholarship 

To foster interest in engineering education at the Rice 
Institute and to provide for recognition for work well done, 
an anonymous donor is contributing to the Rice Institute 
the sum of $175 annually as a stipend for the Junior Engi- 
neering Scholarship, to be awarded to that male student in 
a regular engineering course of the Junior year who has the 
highest scholastic standing in his courses taken that year. 
This scholarship is restricted to no particular field of engi- 
neering, the selection of the scholar is made by the Faculty, 
and in making the selection account is taken of individual 
qualifications of character and personality, but no consider- 
ation is to be given to the financial circumstances of the 
student. The first award of the Junior Engineering Scholar- 
ship was made for the academic year 1928-29. 

The Edith Ripley Scholarships 

Mrs. Edith Ripley, of Houston, established three Edith 
Ripley Scholarships by the donation of $10,000 to the 
Rice Institute, the income of which is to be distributed 
equally and annually to three young women students of 
the Institute to be selected by the Faculty. In selecting 
the beneficiaries of this donation, consideration is to be 
given to the mental, moral, and womanly qualities of the 
candidates, as well as to their financial necessities. The 
first awards of the three Edith Ripley Scholarships were 
made for the academic year 1928-29. 

[26] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The Mary Parker Gieseke Scholarship 

Mr. Fred A. Gieseke, of Houston, and his daughter, Mrs. 
James Carter Boone, a graduate of the Rice Institute, 
established the Mary Parker Gieseke Scholarship in mem- 
ory of the late Mrs. Fred A. Gieseke, by a gift to the Rice 
Institute of $5000. This memorial scholarship is to be 
awarded annually for high standing in scholarship to a 
student of the Rice Institute who has been in residence at 
least one year. The first award of the Mary Parker Gieseke 
Scholarship was made for the academic year 1929-30. 

The Thomas Aubrey Dickson and Pauline Martin 
Dickson Scholarships 

The late Mrs. Pauline Martin Dickson, of Houston, in 
execution of the wishes of herself and her husband, the late 
Dr. Thomas Aubrey Dickson, bequeathed to the San 
Jacinto Trust Company a sum of $10,000, the income of 
which is to be paid semi-annually to the Rice Institute for 
the support of scholarships to be known as the Thomas 
Aubrey Dickson and the Pauline Martin Dickson Scholar- 
ships, to be awarded by the Faculty, on the basis of scholar- 
ship, to self-supporting students of the Institute, young 
men or young women. The first awards of the Dickson 
Scholarships were made for the academic year 1932-33. 

The Traveling Scholarship in Architecture 

Provision for a Rice Institute Traveling Scholarship in 
Architecture has been made by the Architectural Society 
of the Rice Institute, and Messrs. W. L. Clayton, George 
S. Cohen, F. A. Heitmann, J. A. Kiesling, E. L. Neville, 

[27] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Cleveland Sewall, and William Ward Watkin, who have 
individually pledged the amount of $150 each year for 
five years to a stipend of $1200 to be given each year to a 
student in architecture for the purposes of European travel 
and study. The selection of the holder of the Traveling 
Scholarship is to be made by the Faculty by means of a 
formal competition, arranged each year for such purpose 
by the Faculty, in which students or graduates of the Rice 
Institute are eligible to participate. The first award of 
the Traveling Scholarship in Architecture was made for 
the academic year 1928-29. 

The Friends of Rice Scholarships 

The Friends of Rice, an association dedicated to the 
encouragement and perpetuation of the purposes, activities, 
and ideals of the Rice Institute on the part of an extensive 
group of men and women of this community, is maintaining 
three annual scholarships in the sum of $200 each. The 
Friends of Rice Scholars are selected by the Faculty on 
grounds of scholarship, general intelligence, and physical 
vigor. The first awards of these three scholarships were 
made for the academic year 1935-36. 

The Chapman-Bryan Memorial Scholarship 

By bequest of the late Miss Johnelle Bryan of Houston 
made on behalf of herself and her sister, the late Mrs. Caro 
Bryan Chapman, the Rice Institute has received the sum 
of $2500 for the endowment of the Chapman-Bryan Me- 
morial Scholarship at this institution. The scholar on this 
foundation, a student of the Institute, is to be selected by 
the Faculty on the basis of high standing, personality, and 

[28] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

physical fitness. The first award of the scholarship was 
made for the academic year 1937-38. 

The Lady Washington Texas Centennial Award 

From the Lady Washington Chapter of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution the Rice Institute has received 
the sum of $1000 in endowment of the Lady Washington 
Texas Centennial Award. This award is to be made yearly 
for scholarship to a young woman student of the Rice In- 
stitute, preference to be given to Houston students of 
Sophomore standing. The first award was made for the 
academic year 1937-38. 

The Katie B. Howard Scholarship 

The Axson Club has undertaken to endow a second 
scholarship at the Rice Institute. Towards the permanent 
endowment thereof a sum of approximately $3500 has been 
raised. The income of this fund is to be awarded from year 
to year to a young woman student of the Institute. The 
Axson Club was organized by Mrs. A. R. Howard, and by 
unanimous vote of her associates the new scholarship bears 
her name. The first award of the Katie B. Howard Scholar- 
ship was made for the academic year 1937-38. 

The Lady Geddes Prize in Writing 

The Right Hon. Sir Auckland Geddes, British Am- 
bassador to the United States, Godwin Lecturer of the 
Rice Institute in 192 1, has endowed at Rice a prize in 
writing, which is to bear the name of Lady Geddes. This 
prize is to be awarded annually from the income of the 
endowment of one thousand dollars. 

[29] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

The first award of the Lady Geddes Prize in Writing was 
made at the end of the academic year 1922-23, the compe- 
tition of this award being open to members of the Freshman 
and Sophomore classes of the Rice Institute, and the sub- 
jects assigned pertaining to the relations between Great 
Britain and the United States. 

The Owen Wister Literary Society Fund 

The Owen Wister Literary Society of the Rice Institute 
is providing an annual donation at the Rice Institute, with 
the intention of raising a permanent endowment for the 
donation. The annual gift is at present devoted to the 
purchase of books on the history of Texas and the West. 
The first appropriation of $250 from this fund was avail- 
able in the academic year 1929-30. More recently the 
Society has been raising $300 annually. 

The Richardson Fund for Rice Students 

Mrs. Libbie A. Richardson, wife of the late Alfred S. 
Richardson, who was a charter member of the Board 
of Trustees of the Rice Institute, bequeathed in trust 
to the Houston Land and Trust Company as trustee, 
approximately $51,000 to constitute the Richardson Fund, 
the income therefrom to be used in educating necessitous 
young men and women at the Rice Institute. The present 
annual income of the Richardson Fund is about $2600. 

The Grant William Jordan and Cora Jordan 
Memorial Fund 

Under the will of the late Mrs. Cora Jordan, a resident of 
Houston, the bulk of her estate was left in trust with the 

[30] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Houston Land and Trust Company as trustee, the income 
therefrom to be used in assisting worthy young men and 
women in obtaining an education at the Rice Institute. 
The Jordan Memorial Fund amounts at present to approx- 
imately $56,000 and the net annual income therefrom 
is about $3000. 

The Sara Stratford Fund 

The Sara Stratford Fund for Women Students of the Rice 
Institute, in memory of the late Mrs. Sara Stratford, first 
Adviser to Women, who served faithfully and efficiently in 
that capacity from the opening of the Institute, is being 
established by her daughter, Mrs. William Bradshaw 
Torrens, her immediate successor as Adviser to Women. For 
the present one hundred dollars per year will be available at 
the time of registration in September, for laboratory or 
other fees of courses, science courses in particular, which 
the candidates, selected by the Committee on Examinations 
and Standing, could not otherwise afford to take. The first 
awards from the Sara Stratford Fund were made in the 
autumn of 1931. 

The Mary Alice Elliott Loan Fund 

In memory of their daughter, the late Mary Alice Elliott, 
who at the time of her death was a student in architecture 
at the Rice Institute in the class attaining, at the graduation 
of 1 93 1, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Architecture, 
Mr. and Mrs. Card G. Elliott, of Houston, are establishing 
the Mary Alice Elliott Loan Fund for Foreign Travel and 
Study in Architecture, in the amount of $2500. A loan of 
$500 from this fund is to be available each year, on recom- 

[31] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

mendation of the Faculty, to an architectural graduate 
who has received honourable mention in the annual com- 
petition for the regular Traveling Scholarship already 
established. 

The first award from the Mary Alice Elliott Loan Fund 
was made for the academic year 1931-32. 

The Robert Pilcher Quin Award 

By a group of student friends of the late Robert Pilcher 
Quin, a member of the Class of 1933, provision is being 
made for an annual "Bob Quin Award," in the form of 
a medal, for qualities in athletics, leadership, scholarship, 
and sportsmanship in which he himself excelled. The 
first of these medals was awarded for the academic year 
1930-31. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

The Rice Institute seeks to interpret in a large way its 
dedication to the advancement of letters, science, and art. 
It not only looks to the employment of these disciplines in 
the development of the life of the individual and in that of 
the race, but it would also play its part in the progress and 
enlargement of human knowledge by contributions of its 
own resident professors and scholars. Accordingly there 
have always been associated with the staff of the Institute 
advanced students in training for careers both as teachers 
and researchers: with this end in view, graduate fellowships 
have been awarded from time to time to degree-bearing 
students of the Institute and other educational foundations. 



[32] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



The Walter B. Sharp Memorial Fund for Research 
in Pure and Applied Science 

In memory of her husband, the late Walter B. Sharp, one 
of the earliest and most successful of the pioneers in the 
development of the petroleum industry in this country, Mrs. 
Estelle B. Sharp, of Houston, has endowed at the Rice 
Institute the Walter B. Sharp Memorial Fund for Research 
in Pure and Applied Science. The income from this fund is 
to be used for the maintenance of resident or traveling 
fellowships in scientific research, preference to be given 
geological research, the production of petroleum and the 
products closely allied thereto. A requisite for eligibility to 
these fellowships is the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, or 
similar standing in this or other institutions. The awards 
are to be known as the Walter B. Sharp Fellowships, and the 
holders thereof as the Walter B. Sharp Fellows of the Rice 
Institute. The first Walter B. Sharp Fellow, at a stipend 
of $2500, was appointed for the academic year 1931-32. 

The Samuel Fain Carter Fellowship 

In memory of her husband, the late Samuel Fain Carter, 
one of the first promoters of the lumber industry in Texas 
and the founder of the Second National Bank of Houston, 
Mrs. Carrie B. Carter has established at the Rice Institute, 
the Samuel Fain Carter Fellowship, with an endowment 
of $20,000 to be administered in trust by the Second 
National Bank. The annual income of this trust fund is to 
be awarded to a graduate student of the Rice Institute, or 
a white graduate of an approved institution of learning, 
for the purpose of enabling the student to continue in 

[33] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

postgraduate work, preferably at the Rice Institute, and, 
when the appropriate graduate schools shall have been 
organized, precedence is to be given to candidates in 
banking, business administration, and forestry. In the 
meantime, the award is to be made for the prosecution of 
postgraduate work in history and allied subjects, in science 
or engineering, or other branches of liberal and technical 
learning for which facilities for advanced work may be 
available at the Rice Institute. Should a graduate of any 
institution other than the Rice Institute receive the award, 
then the postgraduate work shall be done only at the Rice 
Institute. The holder is to be known as the Samuel Fain 
Carter Fellow of the Rice Institute. The award is to be 
made by the Faculty, on the basis of highest standing in 
scholarship, with consideration of financial circumstances, 
personality, and physical fitness. The first Samuel Fain 
Carter Fellow was appointed for the academic year 1933-34. 

THE PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 

The Senate of the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa at 
its meeting in December, 1927, voted to recommend the 
establishment of a chapter at the Rice Institute, and at a 
meeting of the National Council held in September, 1928, 
the institution of the Rice, or Beta of Texas, Chapter was 
duly authorized. The chapter was formally installed on 
March 1, 1929, by the Secretary of the United Chapters. 

THE SOCIETY OF THE SIGMA XI 

The Society of the Sigma Xi, for the promotion of research 
and science, on the occasion of its thirty-eighth annual con- 

[34] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

vention in December, 1937, acting upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Executive Committee, duly authorized the es- 
tablishment of a chapter of the Society at the Rice Institute. 
The formal installation of the Rice chapter by the president 
of the national organization took place on March 23, 1938. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-HELP 

In addition to the stipends of fellowships and endowed 
scholarships, there are, on the campus and in the city, 
opportunities in considerable variety for worthy and de- 
serving students to earn a part of their living expenses 
while attending the Institute. Information concerning 
such openings may be obtained from the Bursar. Thanks 
also to the generosity of a number of citizens of Houston, 
there are available several student loan funds. Inquiries 
concerning the administration of these funds should be 
addressed to the Bursar. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All candidates for admission to the Institute are required 
to present satisfactory testimonials as to their character, 
and either to present a certificate of graduation from an 
approved public or private high school, or, in lieu thereof, 
to pass examinations in the entrance subjects. The stand- 
ard requirements for matriculation are determined by the 
system of units given below. A unit represents a course of 
study pursued five hours a week for an academic year. 
Appropriate application forms may be secured from the 
Registrar. 

[35] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Fifteen units are required for entrance in full standing 
to the Freshman class of the Institute. No candidate for 
admission will be accepted with fewer than fifteen units. 
And towards this total of fifteen units, every candidate 
will be required to present, from the lists of subjects printed 
below, at least three units in English, three units in mathe- 
matics, 1 including two in algebra and one in plane geometry, 
two units in history, and three units in one foreign language 
or two units in each of two foreign languages. It is recom- 
mended that candidates offer from one to three units in 
science. Variation in the distribution of units may be con- 
sidered in individual cases. 

METHOD OF PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

/. General Policy of Competitive Admission of Students 

With the rapid growth in population of Houston and the 
Southwest, accompanied by an even more rapid increase 
in the demand for college training, the Rice Institute is 
brought face to face with the problem of maintaining high 
standards of instruction without shutting the door of 
opportunity to properly qualified students. It is therefore 
proposed, for the immediate future, to meet this problem 
by a plan of admission based on the following principles: 

i. The maintenance, as in the past, of standards for 
entrance on a high plane. 

2. The adoption in advance for each academic year or 
group of years of a specific number of new students 

1 Students expecting to enter the Institute are advised to elect 
mathematics during their fourth year. If possible, this course should 
include training in algebra and trigonometry. 

[36I 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

to be admitted on a competitive basis. This number 
should be slightly smaller than the demand but not 
so far below that demand as to cause injustice to well 
qualified students. 
3. The division of students into still smaller groups, 
especially in the classes in elementary subjects. The 
adoption of this principle makes necessary the 
acceptance of a smaller total number, but means 
that a larger number will receive careful and ade- 
quate instruction. 

II. Specific Plan for the Admission of Four Hundred New 
Students in the Autumn of 1938 

The Rice Institute will accept four hundred new students 
in September, 1938. The total student body will thus 
consist of about thirteen hundred members, which was 
approximately the enrollment in September, 1937. 

In selecting the members of the Freshman class the 
Committee will be guided by such principles as the fol- 
lowing: 

1. As at present, no candidate to be accepted with 
fewer than fifteen units. 

2. Preference to be given to candidates who present 
the maximum number of units in English, mathe- 
matics, foreign languages, science, and history. 

3. Preference to be given to candidates who show special 
promise and capacity for leadership, especially those 
in the upper half of their high-school class. 

4. Of candidates not in one of the above preferential 
groups, special preference to be given to those who 

[37] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

prove fitness by taking entrance examinations in 
one or more subjects. 

5. Preference to be given to candidates whose applica- 
tions are received early. 

Candidates, once chosen, are received without condi- 
tions. 

LIST OF SUBJECTS WITH VALUES 
IN UNITS 

Botany i ; Chemistry 1 ; Civics (}4 or 1) ; English (3 or 4) ; 
French (Elementary 2, Intermediate 1, Advanced 1); 
German (Elementary 2, Intermediate 1); Greek (Grammar 
and Elementary Prose Composition 1, Xenophon 1, 
Homer — Iliad, Books I— III 1); History (Ancient I, Mediae- 
val and Modern 1, English 1, American 1); Latin (Gram- 
mar, Elementary Prose Composition and Caesar 2, Cicero 
I, Virgil 1); Mathematics (Algebra 2, Plane Geometry I, 
Solid Geometry }4, Trigonometry y£) ; Spanish (Ele- 
mentary 2, Intermediate 1, Advanced 1); Physics 1; 
Physical Geography yi ; Physiology yi ; General Science 1 ; 
Zoology 1. Substitutes for certain of these subjects may be 
considered in individual cases. 

Entrance examinations will be held at the Institute be- 
ginning September 12, 1938, and again during the week 
beginning May 8, 1939. Applications for the privilege 
of taking these examinations must be received at the 
Registrar's Office three weeks in advance of the begin- 
ning of the examinations. Such applications must be 
accompanied by statements and records from schools 
attended by candidates. Appropriate forms for such appli- 

[38] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

cations and records may be obtained from the Registrar's 
Office of the Rice Institute on request. 

The terms of admission to the Institute are based on 
the recommendations of the Carnegie Foundation for the 
Advancement of Teaching as expressed in the Documents 
of the College Entrance Examination Board. Complete 
information with respect to further details of these re- 
quirements will be forwarded by the Institute to any 
candidate upon receipt of a request addressed to the 
Registrar of the Institute. 

Advanced credit will be granted to students coming 
from other recognized colleges and universities only when 
the work presented is equivalent in content and quality to 
a full year course at the Institute. Such prospective stu- 
dents should make early application to the Registrar and 
submit official statements of their preparatory and college 
work, together with catalogues of the institutions attended. 

EXPENSES 

The opportunities for study and research offered by the 
Rice Institute are open without tuition both to young men 
and to young women. Students, of course, are expected to 
meet all expenses incurred in the purchase of text books, 
drafting instruments, note books, examination papers, cer- 
tificates and diplomas, and the laboratory expenses in the 
experimental courses in pure and applied science. An 
annual registration fee of twenty-five dollars is required 
of all students. A student blanket-tax of eight dollars and 
forty cents is required of all students to meet the expenses 
of the Students Association. A fee of sixteen dollars is 

[39] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

required at registration time of every male student regis- 
tering for the first time, for the use of physical training 
equipment during his residence; for details see page 96. 
Students transferring to the Rice Institute from other insti- 
tutions and ranked as Freshmen pay this fee on admission. 
Those classified as Sophomores pay twelve dollars; as 
Juniors, eight dollars; as Seniors, four dollars. An annual 
medical fee of five dollars is required of all students living 
in the residential halls. 

A contingent deposit of ten dollars, payable at registra- 
tion, must be maintained by each student. In addition to 
this general contingent deposit, laboratory deposits, also 
payable at registration, must be maintained at the Office 
of the Bursar as follows: a deposit of ten dollars for Biology 
360, for Psychology 300, and for Architecture 310, 440, 510, 
and 540; a deposit of twenty-five dollars for each laboratory 
course taken in biology, chemistry, physics, and psychology; 
a deposit of twenty-five dollars for Engineering no, cover- 
ing also the purchase of approved drawing instruments; a 
deposit of twenty-five dollars for Mechanical Engineering 
310 and for Electrical Engineering 300, 330, and 450; and 
a deposit of twenty-five dollars on the part of every student 
in architecture, and every Sophomore, Junior, and Senior 
in engineering, chemical engineering excepted. 

These deposits, contingent and laboratory, will ordinarily 
cover the charges against the student for materials, et 
cetera, but whenever the charges against any particular 
deposit approach the amount of that deposit, the student 
will be required to make such additional payment as will 
bring the deposit to its original amount: this is what is 
meant by maintaining a deposit. Any balances on these 

[40] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

deposits are returned in July following the academic year. 
For delayed registration a penalty is required. 

No student in arrears in his bills, including obliga- 
tions to loan funds, will be admitted to any of the exami- 
nations, or be given any certificate or report of academic 
standing. 

Men students registering for the first time will be expected 
to live in the residential halls on the campus for not less 
than one year. The period of residence, however, may be 
postponed for one year in case the parent or guardian 
certifies that the student is financially unable to live in the 
halls, but in such circumstances the student will be ex- 
pected to live with relatives. 

Rooms in the residential halls for men, completely 
furnished exclusive of linen, may be had for ninety dollars 
per year, twenty-five dollars of the rental being paid when 
the lease is signed, thirty-one dollars paid on September 
fourteenth, and the remainder paid on February ninth. As 
the charge for table board will be made at actual cost, the 
monthly price, payable in advance, will probably vary dur- 
ing the year. Until November first, a blanket-charge of 
one dollar and two cents per day will be made. 

These residential halls are of absolutely fireproof con- 
struction, heated by steam, lighted by electricity, cleaned 
by vacuum apparatus, and equipped with the most ap- 
proved form of sanitary plumbing, providing adequate 
bathing facilities on every floor. Rooms in the halls will be 
let in the order of applications received. Such applications 
shoi Id be addressed to the Office of the Bursar. 

Accommodations for the residence of young women on 
the university grounds are not available at present, but 

[41] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

there is access to rest rooms, tennis courts, and other forms 
of recreation under the supervision of Miss Sarah Louise 
Lane, B.A. (Rice), B.S. in Library Service (Columbia), 
Adviser to Women. Information concerning desirable places 
of residence for young women students may be had at the 
Office of the Bursar. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION FOR DEGREES 

Although it is the policy of the institution to develop 
its university programme rather more seriously from the 
science end, there are also being provided facilities for 
elementary and advanced courses in the so-called humani- 
ties, thereby enabling the Institute to offer both the ad- 
vantages of a liberal general education and those of special 
and professional training. Extensive general courses in 
the various domains of scientific knowledge will be avail- 
able, but in the main the programme consists of subjects 
carefully coordinated and calling for considerable con- 
centration of study. These programmes have been so 
arranged as to offer a variety of courses in arts, in science, 
in letters, and in their applications to the several fields of 
engineering, architecture, and other regions of applied 
science, leading after four years of undergraduate work 
to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Degrees will also be 
offered in architecture and in chemical, civil, electrical, 
and mechanical engineering. Furthermore, for the degrees 
of Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy, and Doctor of 
Engineering, every facility will be afforded properly 
qualified graduate students to undertake lines of study 
and research under the direction of the Institute's resident 
and visiting professors. 

[42] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The academic programmes of study leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts after four years of study are of a com- 
mon type for the first two years, but for the third and 
fourth years are differentiated into two forms : first, general 
courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, either 
with some grade of distinction or without special mention, 
and, second, honours courses leading to the degree with 
honours in certain subjects. These are types that will be 
referred to in the sequel as general courses and honours 
courses respectively. 

The general course leading to the degree of B .A. has been 
arranged to give thorough training to those students who 
are seeking university instruction in literary and scientific 
subjects either as a part of a liberal education or as prelimi- 
nary to entering upon a business or professional career. 
The general course, therefore, involves the study of several 
subjects up to a high university standard but does not in- 
clude a highly detailed specialized study of any one subject 
such as is necessary before research work or university 
teaching can be profitably undertaken. Students wishing to 
specialize with a view to research work and university teach- 
ing may either complete an honours B.A. course and then 
proceed by graduate study to the degrees of M.A. and 
Ph.D., or they may first take a general B.A. course and 
after completing it proceed by graduate study to the higher 
degrees. 

The attention of students intending to enter the profes- 
sion of engineering or architecture is called to the great ad- 
vantages in first taking a general or honours academic 
course before beginning special study in engineering or 
architecture. At present the Institute is not offering courses 

[43] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

leading to degrees in law and medicine, but students looking 
forward to such careers will find in the earlier years of the 
B.A. course all the requirements for admission to many 
medical and law schools, provided suitable subjects are 
chosen. However, attention is called to the fact that sev- 
eral professional schools of law and medicine now require 
bachelor degrees for admission. 

As has already been intimated, the course for the degree 
of B.A. extends over four years. During the first two years 
a considerable part of the work is prescribed, while during 
the last two years each student is allowed, within certain 
restrictions, to select the subjects he studies. In the ma- 
jority of the courses the formal instruction offered consists 
of three lectures a week together with laboratory work in 
certain subjects. Preliminary examinations for all new 
undergraduates are held in December, examinations for 
all students are given in February, and final examinations 
for all are held in June. Other examinations are given 
from time to time at periods determined by the in- 
structors. 

These examinations are conducted under a student honor 
system. In determining the standing of a student in each 
class, both his work during the term and the record of his 
examinations are taken into account. 

Of subjects included in the B.A. courses the following 
are now available: 



Group A 


Group B 


I. English 


1. Pure Mathematics 


2. French 


2. Applied Mathematics 


3. German 


3. Physics 



44] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 





Group A 




Group B 


4- 


Italian 


4- 


Chemistry 


5- 


Spanish 


5- 


Biology 


6. 


Economics 


6. 


Psychology 


7- 


Education 


7- 


Chemical Engineering 


8. 


History 


8. 


Civil Engineering 


9- 


Philosophy 


9- 


Electrical Engineering 


10. 


Architecture 


10. 


Mechanical Engineering 



Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts of the Rice 
Institute will be required to select studies from the preced- 
ing groups according to the yearly programmes exhibited 
below. 

First Year 

(i) Pure mathematics 

(2) English 

(3) A modern language 

(4) A science 

(5) One other subject 

Second Year 

(1) Pure mathematics or a science 

(2) English 

(3) A modern language 1 
(4-5) Two other subjects. 

At the beginning of the third year students may elect 

to take either a general course or an honours course. 

1 Students who enter with credit in two modern languages may 
substitute another subject for (3) in the second year; on the other 
hand, students must take at least one second year language course for 
graduation . 

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Third Year General B.A. Course 

Four subjects, of which two must have been taken in the 
second year and one in both first and second. At least one 
subject from each of the groups A and B must be taken. 
Students will receive advice in the selection of their subjects. 

Fourth Year General B.A. Course 

Four subjects, two of which must have been taken in the 
third year and one in both second and third or in first and 
third. At least one subject from each of the groups A and B 
must be taken. However, students will be allowed to spe- 
cialize in their fourth year, provided they substitute an ad- 
vanced course for the required group A or group B subject. 

A student who wishes to become a candidate for a general 
B.A. degree should report his candidacy in writing at the 
beginning of the year in which he expects to take his degree. 

To students who have completed a general four years' 
course the B.A. degree will be awarded either with some 
grade of distinction or without special mention. 

HONOURS COURSES 

The third and fourth year honours courses are intended 
for students who wish to specialize in particular branches 
of knowledge with a view to research work or teaching or 
later professional studies. 

In view of these special objects, the requirements in such 
courses will be more severe than in the general courses in 
the same subjects. For this reason it is recommended that 
students exercise due caution and seek advice before elect- 

[46] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



ing to take an honours course. Only those students who 
have shown in their first and second years that they are 
especially well qualified will be permitted to take an honours 
course. A student proposing to take an honours course must 
satisfy the department concerned that he is qualified to pro- 
ceed with the study of that subject. He will be required to 
take the lectures and practical work provided for honours 
students in that subject during each of the two years and 
in addition certain courses in allied subjects. It is a decided 
advantage for students in honours courses to have had some 
preparation in French or German before entering college. 
In 1938-39 honours courses will be available as follows: 



Pure and applied mathematics 

Theoretical and experimental physics 

Modern languages and literatures 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Economics and mathematics 

English 

History 

Philosophy 



The following programme of honours courses in physics 
may be taken as typical of such courses : 

Third year, four subjects: (1) mathematics, (2) and (3) 
Physics 300 and 320, or 310 and 330, (4) one other 
subject. 

Fourth year, four subjects: (1) mathematics, (2) and (3) 
Physics 300 and 320, or 310 and 330, (4) one other subject. 

A student who wishes to become a candidate for a degree 
with honours should report his candidacy at the beginning 

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of his third year and renew his application at the beginning 
of his fourth year. 

The degree of B.A. with honours will be awarded at the 
end of the fourth year to students who have completed an 
honours course. Candidates for honours who fail may be 
excused such part of a general course as may be equivalent 
to the work they have done. Candidates for honours who 
are not making satisfactory progress may be required to 
discontinue their honours course and may be excused such 
part of a general course as may be equivalent to the work 
they have done. 

For courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, 
see pages ioo and 123. 

A student who has completed a general or an honours course 
for the B.A. degree may obtain the Master of Arts degree 
after the successful completion of one year of graduate work. 

A candidate for the M.A. degree must elect a principal 
subject, and submit his schedule in writing when he reports 
his candidacy. Such a schedule must represent the equivalent 
of four advanced courses to be passed with high credit. The 
work shall consist of (a) personal investigation, the results 
of which must be submitted as a thesis, and (b) at least two 
advanced courses of lectures, one of which must be a gradu- 
ate course in the principal subject. In addition, candidates 
for the M.A. degree must pass a public examination. 

For courses leading to the degree of Master of Science, 
see page 98. 

A student who has completed a course for the B.A. de- 
gree may be admitted as a candidate for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. In addition to high attainment, 
preparation for the Ph.D. degree involves usually at least 

[48] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

three years of graduate work. Candidates for the degree 
must submit a thesis and pass a public examination. The 
thesis must present a distinctly original contribution to the 
subject. It must be published in an accredited journal or 
series, and fifty printed copies must be deposited in the 
Institute library. 

Candidates who successfully complete the first four years 
of the engineering course will receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in a specified branch of engineering. This degree 
will be awarded with distinction to students whose work is 
of a high standard. Candidates who successfully complete 
the five years' engineering course will receive the degree of 
Ch.E., C.E., E.E., or M.E. according to the branch of engi- 
neering taken. Under requirements conforming to those 
for the M.A. degree, namely, high standing, a thesis, and a 
public examination, the M.S. degree in a specified branch 
of engineering may be awarded. 

Candidates who successfully complete the five years' 
course in architecture will be awarded the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science in Architecture. Students in architecture who 
satisfy all the requirements for the degree of M.A. may 
elect to take that degree if they prefer. 

STANDING IN SCHOLARSHIP OF UNDER- 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Schedule of Undergraduate Students. — The regular sched- 
ule of undergraduate students is five courses in the Fresh- 
man year, five courses in the Sophomore year, four courses 
in the Junior year, and four courses in the Senior year. The 
regular schedules for students of engineering and architec- 

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ture may be found in these Announcements beginning on 
pages ioo and 123 respectively. Admission to less than the 
regular schedule is rarely granted, and then only in the 
most exceptional circumstances. One extra course may be 
taken in the second year and one in the third year by stu- 
dents who are not on probation. Deficiencies of the first 
two years must be removed before the year in which a 
student is a candidate for a degree, and may not be removed 
by extra courses in that year. An excess schedule must be 
reduced if a student fails to attain a grade of III or better 
in three courses, or if he fails to pass any course without at 
the same time doing work of exceptional quality in his other 
courses. No credit is given toward graduation for less than 
a full year's course in any subject, but a course which has 
been dropped by permission after the February examina- 
tions and in which a student's standing is satisfactory may 
be carried to completion in a succeeding year. Summer 
school courses will be accepted to remove not more than 
one Freshman or Sophomore deficiency. To remove a col- 
lege deficiency no credit will be given for a course unless it 
is the equivalent in content and quality of a full year course 
at the Institute. 

Examinations. — All courses at the Rice Institute are year 
courses. Preliminary examinations are given in December 
to all new undergraduates. Regular written examinations 
are given to all students in February and at the close of the 
academic year in June. In Junior and Senior courses (listed 
as 300 or 400 courses), the June examinations cover the 
work of the whole year. In elementary courses (listed as 
100 or 200 courses), examinations cover the work done from 
the time of the preceding examination. 

[50] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Dropping of Students for Deficiencies in Scholarship. — 
A student will be required to withdraw from the Institute 
if he fails in as much as one-half of the work of his schedule. 
He will also be dropped for failure to come off probation 
within one year, or for poor scholarship due to absences 
from the exercises of his schedule. Any student who with- 
draws from the Institute within five weeks of the beginning 
of any regular examination period on account of failure in 
his courses will be regarded as dropped from the Institute. 

A student dropped from the Institute is not entitled to 
readmission. Exceptions may be made and a student 
granted readmission on presentation of satisfactory evi- 
dence that previous deficiencies have been removed. 
Dropped students, when allowed to return, are received 
only on probation. Students who have been dropped twice 
are not entitled to readmission. 

Probation. — A student who is carrying five courses will 
be placed on probation if among his grades for the term 
there are two V's 1 or no grade better than IV. A student 
who is carrying four courses will be placed on probation if 
he has one V and one other grade below III, or has failed 
to obtain a grade of III or better in at least one course. A 
student with fewer than four courses will be placed on pro- 
bation if he has one V, or if he does not obtain at least two 
grades of III or better. Probation is terminated only at 
regular examination periods and must be terminated within 
one year's time or the student will be dropped from the 
Institute. A student who is on probation may also be 
dropped at any time during the probation period for in- 

1 The symbols have the following meanings: I Very high standing, 
II High standing, III Medium standing, IV Low standing, V Failure. 

[51] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

attention to the requirements of his schedule. A student 
who is on probation is not permitted to be a candidate for 
or to hold any elective office, or to serve as editor, assistant 
editor, business manager, or assistant business manager of 
a college publication. 

Promotion. — To attain Sophomore standing, a student 
must have obtained in four of the five courses of the Fresh- 
man year, passing grades of which two must have been III 
or better. To attain Junior standing, a student must have 
obtained in at least nine of the ten courses of the Freshman 
and Sophomore years, passing grades of which four must 
have been III or better. To attain Senior standing, a stu- 
dent must have obtained passing grades, of which six must 
have been III or better, in at least thirteen courses of the 
five courses of the Freshman year, the five courses of the 
Sophomore year, and the four courses of the Junior year, 
required for full Senior standing. To obtain the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, a student must have obtained passing 
grades, of which eight must have been III or better, in five 
Freshman courses, five Sophomore courses, four Junior 
courses, and four Senior courses, required for the first de- 
gree. Attention is called to the fact that this four years' 
course is built up by years. Accordingly four courses of the 
Freshman and Sophomore years respectively will not be 
credited as the equivalent of four courses of the Junior and 
Senior years respectively, a higher standard and wider 
range of collateral work being required of Juniors and 
Seniors who elect in either of those years an elementary 
subject of the Freshman and Sophomore years. 

No student shall attain Sophomore, Junior, or Senior 
standing in engineering and architecture who lacks more 

[52] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

than one course of the standard schedule required for full 
standing in those years. 

SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION FOR 1938-39 

Of the courses to be offered during the scholastic year 
1938-39 it is possible to announce those described below. 
The numbers designating the courses have the following 
signification : courses whose numbers begin with 1 are open 
to all students of the Institute; courses whose numbers 
commence with 2 are open to Sophomores, Juniors, and 
Seniors; those beginning with 3 are open to Juniors and 
Seniors; those beginning with 4 are Senior courses. Unless 
otherwise indicated, all courses consist of at least three 
exercises a week. For each course the days of the week and 
the hours have been indicated. 

English 100. The Theory and Practice of English Com- 
position, with the study of fundamental literary forms. The 
primary purpose of the course is to give students the com- 
mand of written English which is necessary for later work in 
college. A secondary but still important purpose is to ex- 
amine the chief types of prose and poetry, as a foundation 
for further courses in literature or for private reading. Re- 
quired of Freshmen. M W F 8:00, 9:00, or 11 :oo or 

T Th S 9:00 or 10:00 

English 200. Outlines of the History of English Litera- 
ture, with collateral reading of major authors representative 
of the various periods. M W F 10:00 

English 210. Argumentation and Public Speaking. 
Practical training in the fundamentals of effective speech, 

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written argument, and debate. Designed to prepare the 
student for the ordinary demands of business life. Plat- 
form speaking, themes, conferences. This course is planned 
primarily for students of physical education. T Th S 9:00 

English 300. English Drama from its Beginnings to 
1642. The development of the drama will be traced from 
the miracle plays and the moralities through the plays of 
Shakespeare and his contemporaries to the closing of the 
theaters. Some emphasis will be placed upon the develop- 
ment of Shakespeare as a dramatist, and upon the in- 
debtedness of Shakespeare to the earlier drama. 

T Th S 1 1 :oo 

English 310. Modern British and American Poetry. A 
survey of poetic development in Great Britain and America 
from 1890 to 1930: the revolt of the 1890's, the Irish 
Renaissance, the Georgians, the poetry of the Great War, 
the "new" American poetry. M W F 11:00 

English 320. Modern Drama. Special study of Ibsen, 
Strindberg, Shaw, Barrie, Galsworthy, O'Neill, and Ander- 
son; reading of representative recent English, American, 
and Continental plays; lectures upon theatrical history, 
acting, and dramatic tendencies. T Th S 10:00 

English 330. Advanced Writing. Themes and confer- 
ences. Emphasis will be laid on such types as the informal 
essay and the short story. This course is intended for stu- 
dents who have already shown some interest in writing. 

TThS 12:00 

[54] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

English 340. The Novel in England and America, with 
special reference to the chief novelists of the eighteenth 
and nineteenth centuries. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

English 350. A Study of Greek and Latin Literature, 
in the best available translations. Considerable emphasis 
will be laid on the debt of modern civilization and literature 
to classical antiquity. M W F 12:00 

English 370. Seventeenth Century Prose and Poetry, 
with special study of Bacon, Milton, and the Restoration 
drama. T Th S 8 :oo 

English 380. Composition and Expression for Engi- 
neers. Training in the writing of business and technical 
reports, and in written and oral argument. Discussion of 
selected reading in engineering subjects and platform speak- 
ing. Offered during the second half-year. Prerequisite: 
English 100. M W F 8:00 or 9:00 

English 390. American Literature. After a brief survey 
of the colonial period, the major authors of the nineteenth 
and early twentieth centuries will be studied in some detail. 
The emphasis throughout will be on the historical and social 
significance of American literature. Due attention will be 
given to the history of culture in the South. M W F 11 :oo 

English 400. Shakespeare. A close study of certain of 
the comedies, histories, and tragedies, with lectures on the 
interpretation of these plays in the light of the Elizabethan 
mind. Open only to Seniors. M W F 9:00 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

English 410. Eighteenth Century Prose and Poetry. 
Studies in the prose writers from Swift to Burke, and in the 
poets from Dryden to Blake. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

English 500. Chaucer: History of the English Language. 
Readings in Chaucer as an introduction to Middle English, 
followed in the second half-year by a survey of the history 
of the English language, with due regard to American 
speech. Strongly recommended for honours students and 
prospective teachers of English. M W F 12:00 

English 530. Topics in English Literary History. Grad- 
uate Research. 

Requirements for Honours Course in English: four 
courses in English; two courses in Modern Languages, 
preferably French, German, or Italian; two courses in 
philosophy or history; all to be Junior or Senior courses 
and to be passed with high grades. Individual schedules 
and quality of work must be satisfactory both to the de- 
partment and to the Committee on Honours Courses and 
Advanced Degrees. 

French 100. First Year French. Oral exercises, dicta- 
tion, grammar, composition, and study of simple French 
texts. M W F 8:00 or 10:00 or 

T Th S 8:00, 9:00, or 10:00 

French 200. Second Year French. Oral exercises, dicta- 
tion, review of grammar, composition, study of representa- 
tive authors, supplementary reading under the supervision 
of the instructor. M W F 12:00 or 

T Th S 8:00, 10:00, or 11 .00 

[56] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

French 210. Advanced French. Review of grammar, 
study of representative texts, all in French. Open to stu- 
dents who have passed French 100 with a grade of I, and 
to students who have had four years of high-school French. 

TThS 10:00 

French 300. Third Year French. Composition and 
study of modern French texts with special emphasis on 
the syntax and the difficulties of the French language. 
A considerable amount of outside reading will be required. 
Reports and essays in French. M W F 9:00 or 11 :oo or 

T Th S 1 1 :oo 

French 320. A Survey of the History of French Litera- 
ture. Open to students who have passed French 200. The 
course is intended for students of English and history as 
well as for those who desire to specialize in French. 

TThS 8:00 

French 420. French Romanticism. T Th S 9:00 

French 450. French Composition and Explications de 
Textes. A detailed study of contemporary texts. Reports 
and essays. Conducted in French. T Th S 10:00 

French 460. Main Currents of French Literature in the 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Conducted in 
French. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

French 520. French Civilization in the Seventeenth 
Century. Hours to be arranged. 

Requirements for Honours Course in French : French 300 
and 320 and two 400 courses passed with high credit 

[57] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

(grades of I or II). Individual schedules and quality of 
work must be satisfactory both to the department and 
to the Committee on Honours Courses and Advanced 
Degrees. 

German ioo. Elementary German. Pronunciation and 
German script, grammar, dictation, conversation, composi- 
tion. Reading of a book or two. M W F 10:00 or 

T Th S 9 :oo or 1 1 :oo 

German 200. Second Year German. Introduction to a 
knowledge of Germany and the Germans, including a short 
survey of German literature. Reading of two works of 
literary importance. Grammar review, discussion and 
composition in German. M W F 11 :oo or T Th S 10:00 

German 300. Classical German Literature from Klop- 
stock to Goethe. Study of eighteenth-century classical 
works. Collateral and outside reading. The work will be 
carried on mainly in German. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

German 320. Germany and German Literature in the 
Twentieth Century. Reading of representative works. Ad- 
vanced composition and discussion. Conducted mainly in 
German. T Th S 8 :oo 

German 400. Nineteenth Century Literature: From 
Romanticism to Naturalism. Lectures. Reading and study 
of some outstanding works including an opera by Richard 
Wagner and a drama by Gerhart Hauptmann. Collateral 
and outside reading. The work will be carried on mainly 
in the German language. Open to all who have studied 
German for at least two years. M W F 9 :oo 

[58] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

German 410. History of the German language including 
an introduction into Middle High German. Survey of old 
German literature. Study of Walther von der Vogelweide's 
poems or of the Nibelungenlied. Conducted in German. 
For undergraduates as well as graduates. 

(Not offered 1938-39.) 

German 420. Goethe. His life and works including the 
reading and study of "Faust." Conducted in German. 

(Not offered 1938-39.) 

German 500. Seminar: German-Americans and their 
literature, particularly in Texas. Discussions, literary trans- 
lations, etc. For graduates and undergraduates. 

(Not offered 1938-39.) 

German 510. Seminar: Any one or two of the following: 
Phonetics; Gothic; Old High German; Middle High Ger- 
man. Mainly for graduates. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

The requirements for the Honours Course in German 
comprise five advanced courses: four in German, all to be 
passed with high credit, and one in English. Individual 
schedules and quality of work must be satisfactory both 
to the department and to the Committee on Honours 
Courses and Advanced Degrees. 

Italian 300. Elementary Italian. Open to students 
who have had at least two years of French, Spanish, or 
Latin. Oral exercises, grammar, composition, and reading 
of representative Italian authors. M W F 10:00 

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Italian 400. Main Currents of Italian literature. 

T Th S 10:00 

Spanish 100. Beginning Spanish. Oral exercises, gram- 
mar, composition, and study of elementary Spanish texts. 

M W F 9 .00 

Spanish iio. Intermediate Spanish. This course pre- 
supposes a knowledge of elementary Spanish (equivalent 
to one year with high credit or two years of high-school 
Spanish). Oral exercises, dictation, grammar, composi- 
tion, translation, and study of modern Spanish texts. 

M W F 10:00 or T Th S 1 1 :oo 

Spanish 200. A rapid beginning course in Spanish for 
students who are taking a regular course in another modern 
language. Oral exercises, grammar, and composition. 

M W F 12:00 

Spanish 210. Second Year Spanish. Oral exercises, re- 
view of grammar, composition, outside reading under the 
supervision of the instructor, and reports. Open to stu- 
dents who have completed three years of high-school 
Spanish or Spanish no. 

M W F 8 :oo or T Th S 10:00 or 11:00 

Spanish 300. Third Year Spanish. Open to all stu- 
dents who have completed Spanish 200 or 210. Review 
of grammar, composition, essays, study of representative 
authors, collateral readings, and reports. 

M W F 8:00 or 12:00 

[60] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Spanish 320. Survey o f the History of Spanish Litera- 
ture. Open to Juniors and Seniors who have taken Spanish 
300 or 330 and to Sophomores upon special recommen- 
dation. T Th S 8:00 

Spanish 330. Commercial Spanish. Open to students 
who have already taken Spanish 200 or 210. A general 
survey of the economic conditions in Spain and in Latin 
American countries. Reading of reviews and bulletins, 
reports, and practical exercises. T Th S 9 :oo 

Spanish 410. Hispano-American Civilization and Litera- 
ture. Open to students who have already taken Spanish 
300 or 330. Lectures, collateral readings, reports and 
discussions. Conducted in Spanish. M W F 10:00 

Spanish 440. The Spanish Drama of the Nineteenth 
Century. T Th S 12:00 

Honours Courses in Spanish may be granted to students 
who have done exceptionally good work in Spanish and 
whose work in another language has been of high stand- 
ing. The Spanish courses required are: Spanish 300, 320, 
330, 410, and 440. Individual schedules and quality of 
work must be satisfactory both to the department and to 
the Committee on Honours Courses and Advanced Degrees. 

Mathematics 100. Elementary Analysis. Trigonom- 
etry and analytic geometry. This course is required for 
Freshmen because it forms a necessary introduction to 
work in mathematics and pure and applied science, and 
assists the students in developing habits of self criticism in 
thinking and writing. As one of the most modern of sciences 
and, at the same time, one of the most ancient of humani- 

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ties, mathematics is regarded as an integral part of any 
general education. Engineering sections meet in three two- 
hour periods. M W F n :oo or 12:00 or 

T Th S 1 1 :oo or 12 :oo 

Mathematics 200. Differential and Integral Calculus. 
Derivatives, differentials, definite integrals, infinite series, 
and their applications, especially to mechanics. Prescribed 
for engineers who do not take Mathematics 210. 

This course continues the work of Mathematics 100 in 
calculus and analytic geometry, with applications to New- 
ton's laws of motion and calculation of moments of forces 
and of inertia, centers of gravity, etc. 

Students who have considerable facility in mathematical 
reasoning should register for Mathematics 210. 

T Th S 9:00, 10:00, or n :oo 

Mathematics 210. Differential and Integral Calculus. 
This course covers the ground of Mathematics 200 but is 
more complete and goes further. It is open to students 
who obtain high grades in Mathematics 100, or otherwise 
satisfy the instructor of their fitness to take the course. A 
feature of this course is the writing of theses on the applica- 
tions of mathematics to science, engineering, and philos- 
ophy. T Th S 10:00 

Mathematics 220. Algebra and Mechanics. Solutions 
of equations, vectors, invariants, determinants, and inter- 
polation; systematic statics and parts of dynamics. The 
second half deals with statics and parts of dynamics. The 
algebraic technique necessary for the mechanical applica- 

[62] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

tions is provided in the work of the first half. All engineer- 
ing students are required to take the first half of Mathe- 
matics 220 or 230. TThS8:oo 

Mathematics 220A. Algebra. The first half of Mathe- 
matics 220. Open to all engineering students. 

(First half-year) T Th S 8 :oo 
(Second half-year) M W F 8 :oo 

Mathematics 230. Algebra and Geometry. The work 
of the first half-year is algebra, the same as the work of 
Mathematics 220A. In the second half-year, general alge- 
braic methods are applied to plane and solid analytic 
geometry and to the projective study of conies. This course 
is especially recommended to students who are preparing to 
teach mathematics in high school. It may be counted as a 
Junior course if the student makes studies of additional 
thesis and problem subjects. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Mathematics 230A. Algebra. The first half of Mathe- 
matics 230 and the same as Mathematics 220A. Open to 
all engineering students. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Mathematics 300. Advanced Calculus and Differential 
Equations. Multiple integrals and partial differentiation, 
with many applications, and the geometry of three dimen- 
sions; differential equations. This course, or Mathematics 
310, is prescribed for electrical engineering students; civil 
and mechanical engineers are required to take the first half 
of it. Open to those who have passed Mathematics 200 or 
210 or otherwise satisfy the instructor of their fitness to 
take the course. M W F 8:00 

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Mathematics 300A. The first half of Mathematics 300. 
Open to civil and mechanical engineers. M W F 8:00 

Mathematics 310. Advanced Calculus and Dynamics. 
Students with considerable facility in mathematical reason- 
ing should take this course rather than Mathematics 300, 
the ground of which it covers. Such students may take 
Mathematics 220 during the same year. Opportunity to 
write theses is given. M W F 12:00 

Mathematics 320. Differential Geometry. The problem 
of area; subharmonic functions; the problem of Plateau. 

Mathematics 400. Theory of Functions, real and com- 
plex variable. The important functions of analysis and 
modern general methods. M W F 12:00 

Mathematics 420. Differential Equations and Introduc- 
tion to the Calculus of Variations. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Mathematics 500. Theory of Functions of a Complex 
Variable. Normal families, automorphic functions, con- 
formal mapping, subharmonic functions. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Mathematics 510. Theory of Functions of a Real Vari- 
able. Summable functions, Lebesgue and Stieltjes inte- 
grals, general integrals, functions of point sets and of 
plurisegments; Fourier series. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Mathematics 520. Series expansions in terms of or- 
thogonal systems of functions. Trigonometric series. The 
course is based upon Mathematics 510. 

Hours to be arranged. 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Mathematics 530. Theory of Groups. Quadratic forms, 
the modular group, rational approximations ; the Lie theory 
and differential equations. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Applied Mathematics 310. Finance, Statistics, and 
Probability. Mathematical theory of investment, analysis 
of statistics as applied to economics and biology, theory of 
probability. T Th S 12:00 

Applied Mathematics 510. Integral Equations; Poten- 
tial Theory. Laplace's and related equations. Boundary 
value problems. Hours to be arranged. 

Seminar in Mathematics. The Seminar meets every 
other week in order to allow the exposition of original in- 
vestigations by its members. W 2 :oo~5 :oo 

Besides these courses as listed above, to be given during 
the academic year 1938-39, others may be given to suit 
the needs of students. Reading courses are also offered in 
analysis, geometry, and applied mathematics in connection 
with research in those fields, and in the teaching of high- 
school mathematics. 

Physics 100. Heat, Light, Mechanics, Sound, Magnet- 
ism, and Electricity. A course of three experimental lec- 
tures, and two hours of practical work per week (students 
preparing for medicine take three hours of laboratory work 
per week). This course is intended for those who wish to 
obtain some general knowledge of the principles of natural 
philosophy on which the modern applications of science to 

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human activities are based. The scientific method of dealing 
with facts and theories is explained and made familiar by 
numerous experimental demonstrations and laboratory 
exercises. For the practical work thirty complete sets of 
apparatus are available for simple experiments. Students 
taking Physics ioo must have taken or be taking Mathe- 
matics ioo. T Th S 1 0:00 Laboratory M or T 1 130-3 130 
or 3 :30~5 130 or W 2 :oo-5 :oo (for premedical students) 

Physics 200. Electricity and Magnetism. A course of 
three lectures and three hours of practical work per week. 
This course with Physics 100 makes up a complete course on 
the principles of physics which is required of all engineering 
students and should be taken by students intending to 
specialize in physics, chemistry, medicine, law, biology, or 
mathematics. In this course the fundamental principles of 
electrical theory are explained and illustrated, including 
the elementary theory of direct and alternating currents, 
electric transmission of power, wireless telegraphy, and 
other modern developments. Certain parts of dynamics 
required for the electrical theory are also included. In 
the laboratory the students are taught how to make 
measurements of all the important electrical quantities 
such as current, resistance, potential, capacity, magnetic 
intensity, magnetic properties of iron and steel and electro- 
chemical equivalents, etc. Thirty complete sets of ap- 
paratus are available for this work. Students taking 
Physics 200 must have completed Mathematics 100 and 
must take Mathematics 200 or 210 at the same time as 
Physics 200. M W F 9:00 Laboratory Th or F 2:00-5:00 

or F 1 0:00- 1 :oo 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Physics 300. Properties of Matter, and Physical Optics. 
A course of three lectures and three hours of practical work 
per week. This course and Physics 310, 320, and 330 to- 
gether make up a more advanced course on physics, 
supplementing the elementary work done in Physics 100 
and 200. The laboratory work includes exact measure- 
ments of such quantities as elastic properties of metals, 
surface tension of liquids, viscosity of liquids, conductivity 
for heat of solids and liquids, vapor pressure of liquids, tem- 
peratures with resistance thermometers, thermo-couples 
and radiation pyrometers, and experimentson spectroscopy, 
interference, diffraction, and polarization of light. Students 
taking this course must have completed Mathematics 200 or 
210. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Physics 310. Electricity. A course of three lectures and 
three hours of practical work per week. This course 
includes a study of the electrical properties of gases, in- 
cluding cathode and positive rays, Roentgen rays, ther- 
mionics, and nuclear physics. Also, electric oscillations, 
electron tubes and their applications. Students taking this 
course must have completed Mathematics 200 or 210. 

M W F 9:00 Laboratory hours to be arranged. 

Physics 320. Introduction to Theoretical Physics. Vibra- 
tions. Vectors and potentials. General dynamical theory. 
Normal coordinates. Conduction of heat. Electrical theory. 
Electromagnetic theory of light. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Physics 330. Chemical Physics. Three lectures per 
week on thermodynamics, including the theory of free 
energy and chemical equilibrium. The theory of dilute 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

solutions. The theory of cracking petroleum. Quantum 
theory of specific heats, radiation and spectra. T Th S 9 :oo 

Physics 340. About ten lessons on glass blowing of one 
hour each. Limited to fifteen students. This course will 
be given from time to time as required. No credit is given 
for this course. 

Physics 350. Geophysics. Gravitational anomalies due 
to underground structures. The torsion balance. The 
propagation of explosion and other waves in the earth. 
The seismograph. Electrical and magnetic methods of 
prospecting for oil and other minerals. Three lectures per 
week. T Th S 11 :oo 

Physics 400. Physics Colloquium. One meeting a 
week at which present-day researches in physics will be 
discussed. No credit is given for this course but graduate 
students and students taking honours courses in physics are 
expected to attend the course. 

Physics 500. Electromagnetic Theory and Electron 
Theory. Two lectures per week. Hours to be arranged. 

Physics 510. Electricity in Gases, X-rays, and Crystal 
Structure. Two lectures per week. (Not offered I93 8_ 39-) 

Physics 520. Quantum Mechanics and Theory of Rela- 
tivity. Two lectures per week. Hours to be arranged. 

Physics 530. Statistical Mechanics, Radioactivity, and 
Nuclear Physics. Two lectures per week. 

(Not offered 1938-39.) 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Physics 540. Research work. 

Attention is invited to the fact that many opportunities 
exist at the present time for persons possessing adequate 
training in physics and mathematics to engage in industrial 
research. A large number of industrial corporations now 
maintain research laboratories for the carrying on of such 
work. Among these may be mentioned the General Electric 
Company, the Bell Telephone Company, the Eastman 
Kodak Company, the National Bureau of Standards, and 
petroleum companies in this vicinity and in other sections 
of the country. Students desiring to qualify for positions in 
such establishments should take the honours course in 
physics and then, if possible, take a graduate course in 
physics leading to the M.A. or the Ph.D. degree. However, 
positions in research laboratories, in the exploration work of 
the oil industry, and at the National Bureau of Standards 
are open to men who have taken the B.A. degree with 
honours in physics. 

The honours course in physics may be taken up by 
students who have completed the first two years of an 
engineering course as well as by academic students. Several 
fellowships are available at the Institute to enable students 
to take graduate work in physics. 

Chemistry 100. Introductory Chemistry and Qualita- 
tive Analysis. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory 
work weekly. (Chemists and chemical engineers take six 
hours of laboratory work weekly the second half-year.) 
A general introductory course dealing with the fundamental 
phenomena and principles of the science. During the first 
half-year the laboratory exercises are arranged to verify 

[69] 



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and illustrate the principles and facts which are discussed 
in the lectures. During the last half-year the laboratory 
work deals with the general principles and methods of quali- 
tative analysis. 

M W F 8:00 Laboratory F 10:00-1 :oo or M or F 2:00-5:00 

Laboratory for chemists and chemical engineers: 

First half-year : F 2 :oo-5 :oo 

Second half-year: W F 2:00-5:00 

Chemistry iio. General Chemistry. Two lectures, one 
recitation, and five hours of laboratory work weekly. This 
is a general introductory course differing from Chemistry 
100 only in giving more attention to elementary organic 
chemistry and biochemistry. It is designed especially for 
and open only to students taking the course in physical edu- 
cation. T Th S 8 .00 Laboratory T Th 9 :oo-i 1 30 

Chemistry 200. Introductory Organic and Introductory 
Physiological Chemistry. Three hours of lectures and reci- 
tation and three hours of laboratory work weekly. This 
course, designed as a second-year course for academic 
students, is not a prerequisite for any other course in 
chemistry, hence students who plan to take Junior and 
Senior work in chemistry should take Chemistry 220 in- 
stead. The lectures and laboratory work of the first half- 
year deal with the chief classes of organic compounds and 
their practical applications; while the lectures and labo- 
ratory work of the second half-year are devoted to the 
physiological processes of the animal body such as diges- 
tion, metabolism, and nutrition, and to blood and urine 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 100. 

M W F 1 1 :oo Laboratory M or F 2 :oo-5 .00 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Chemistry 220. Quantitative Analysis. Three lectures 
and eight hours of laboratory work weekly. The course 
aims to familiarize the student with the fundamental prin- 
ciples of analytical chemistry and, by extensive laboratory 
and problem work, with the application of these principles 
to a variety of representative analytical processes. Special 
emphasis is placed on chemical mathematics and stoichiom- 
etry and throughout the work attention is given to general 
analytical technique. This course is required of all chemical 
engineers and premedical students and of academic students 
who expect to take further work in chemistry. Prerequi- 
sites: Chemistry 100 and Physics 100. 

M W F 8 .00 Laboratory M T or W Th 1 130-5 :30 

Chemistry 300A. Organic Chemistry. Three lectures 
and six hours of laboratory work weekly. The course is de- 
signed to give a thorough survey of aliphatic and aromatic 
chemistry with an introduction to the heterocyclic com- 
pounds, and to present the theories relating to their struc- 
ture and reactions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 220. 

M W F 8 :oo Laboratory M T or W Th 2 :oo-5 :oo 

Chemistry 300B. Organic Chemistry. Three lectures 
and three hours of laboratory work weekly. A course ar- 
ranged primarily for premedical students and academic 
students not specializing in chemistry. This course differs 
from Chemistry 300A only in the type of laboratory prepa- 
rations. The laboratory work is devoted chiefly to the 
synthesis of typical examples of general and local anes- 
thetics, disinfectants, analgesics, arsenicals, biological 
preparations, alkaloids and dyes. Prerequisites: Chemistry 

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220. (See page 83 for course recommended for premedical 
students.) 

M W F 8 :oo Laboratory M T W or Th 2 :oo~5 :oo 

Chemistry 310. Physical Chemistry. Three hours of 
lectures and recitation and four hours of laboratory work 
weekly. A quantitative study of theoretical and physical 
chemistry dealing with the forms of matter, changes of 
state and energy, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, 
photochemistry, and atomic structure. Prerequisites : Chem- 
istry 220 and Physics 200. 

M W F 9 :oo Laboratory M or Th 1 :30-5 30 

Chemistry 400. Inorganic Chemistry. Three lectures 
weekly during the second half-year. To secure a Senior 
credit Chemistry 410A should be taken the first half-year. 
The course consists of a study of the chemical elements 
and their compounds from the standpoint of the periodic 
table, the theory of valence, and the phase rule. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 310. M W F 9:00 (second half-year) 

Chemistry 410. Colloid Chemistry. Three lectures and 
four hours of laboratory work weekly. For academic stu- 
dents. During the first half-year the course treats of the 
theories of colloid chemistry and their applications in 
biology and the arts. During the second half-year the 
course considers the application of X-ray and phase rule 
methods to colloid chemistry. Prerequisite : Chemistry 310. 
M W F 9 :oo Laboratory W 1 =30-5 130 

Chemistry 410A. Colloid Chemistry for Chemical En- 
gineers. This course is the same as the first half-year of 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Chemistry 410. It may be elected also by academic stu- 
dents who wish to take Chemistry 400 the second half- 
year. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310. 

M W F 9 :oo Laboratory W I 30-5 .-30 (first half-year) 

Chemistry 440. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Two 
lectures and four to six hours of laboratory work weekly. 
The work of the first half-year is devoted to qualitative 
organic analysis. This portion of the course embodies a 
systematic procedure for the separation and identification of 
pure organic compounds. It aims to review, by actual 
laboratory contact, the important reactions of the main 
series of organic substances. 

During the second half-year the lectures will emphasize 
the physical basis of organic chemistry. The recent theories 
of valence and the relation of physical properties to chemical 
constitution will be considered along with advanced organic 
topics such as tautomerism, geometrical and optical isom- 
erism, the chemistry of carbohydrates, dyes, etc. The 
laboratory work is devoted to quantitative organic analysis. 
Students showing special aptitude will be given instruction 
in quantitative micro-analysis based upon the procedures of 
Fritz Pregl. Prerequisites: Chemistry 300 and 310. 

T Th 9:00 Laboratory hours to be arranged. 

Chemistry 450. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. Two 
lectures and six hours of laboratory work weekly. The first 
part of the laboratory work deals with the systematic anal- 
ysis of complex substances such as minerals and alloys. In 
the second part, physico-chemical methods of analysis are 
studied. The lectures deal with the theoretical aspects of the 
processes studied in the laboratory. Hours to be arranged. 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Chemistry 460. Physiological Chemistry. Three lec- 
tures and three hours of laboratory work weekly. The lec- 
tures and laboratory work deal with the chemistry involved 
in the physiological processes of the animal body, such as 
digestion, metabolism, and nutrition, and with blood and 
urine chemistry. This course is designed primarily for the 
academic student and is not intended to replace similar 
courses given in medical schools. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
300 or taking Chemistry 300. 

M W F 9 :oo Laboratory M or F 2 :oo~5 :oo 

Chemistry 470. Experimental Problems. Students who 
are specializing in chemistry may elect in their Senior year 
at least nine hours a week in experimental problems under 
the direction of some member of the staff of instruction. 

Chemistry 480. Chemical Literature; History of Chem- 
istry. One lecture weekly. The first half-year is devoted to 
a study of the arrangement of chemical literature and its 
use in industrial and research work. It is the aim of this 
portion of the course to acquaint the student with the 
literature of chemistry, how it is organized and made avail- 
able, to give some practice in its use, and also to indicate 
the growth of the science. During this time a topic will be 
assigned to each student every week for a thorough library 
investigation. A fee of two dollars is required to cover cer- 
tain expenses in connection with the library work, etc. 

A series of lectures is given during the second half-year on 
the history of chemistry, the purpose being to emphasize 
the important changes which have been made in chemistry 
and to acquaint the student with the chemists mainly 
responsible for them. 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

This course is required of all Senior chemical engineers 
and Senior students specializing in chemistry. Prerequisite : 
German ioo. Hours to be arranged. 

Chemistry 500. Thesis. Graduate students who are 
specializing in chemistry are expected to elect at least nine 
hours a week in research under the direction of some mem- 
ber of the staff of instruction. 

Chemistry 510. Application of X-ray Diffraction Meth- 
ods. Three lectures weekly. Application of X-ray diffrac- 
tion methods to inorganic and colloid chemistry. Identifica- 
tion of solid phases, determination of particle size, X-ray 
analysis of simple types of structures, and principles and 
operation of modern X-ray apparatus. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Chemistry 520. Selected Topics in Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry. Two lectures weekly and a seminar fortnightly. 
Discussion of such topics as atomic and molecular structure, 
interatomic forces, lattice energy, crystal chemistry, com- 
plex compounds, valence theory, etc. A reading knowledge 
of French and German is desirable. Hours to be arranged. 

Chemistry 540. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry. 
Two conferences per week. Discussion of such topics as: 
the electron theory of valency applied to organic chemistry; 
the effect of structure on the reactivity of organic com- 
pounds; the constitution of benzene; the chemistry of the 
heterocyclic compounds, etc., with special emphasis on 
recent work. A reading knowledge of French and German 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

will be necessary as assignments will be made to the original 
literature. Given in 1939-40 and every third year thereafter. 

Chemistry 570. Microchemical Analysis. One lecture 
and six hours of laboratory work weekly. A course in quan- 
titative micro-analysis based on the procedures of Fritz 
Pregl. Prerequisite: Chemistry 440. Hours to be arranged. 

Students who desire to take their major work in chemistry 
should select their courses according to the following ar- 
rangement: 

First Year 

(1) Chemistry 100 

(2) English 100 

(3) Physics 100 

(4) Mathematics 100 

(5) Biology 100 or Engineering no 



Second Year 



(1) Chemistry 220 

(2) Physics 200 

(3) German 100 

(4) Mathematics 200 

(5) English 200 

Third Year 

(1) Chemistry 310 

(2) Chemistry 300 

(3) Chemical Engineering 305-315 

(4) An approved course in mathematics or physics 

(5) German 200 or French 100 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Fourth Year 

(1-4) Four full-year courses selected from the following: 

Chemistry 400 

Chemistry 410 

Chemistry 440 

Chemistry 460 

Chemical Engineering 405 

Chemical Engineering 425 

Chemical Engineering 435 
(5) An approved elective (not chemistry or chemical en- 
gineering) 

Academic students desiring to take a general course in 
chemistry involving one subject each year should take 
Chemistry 100, 220, 300 or 310, and 410 or 460. 

In addition to the general requirements for advanced 
degrees given on pages 48 and 49, the following specific re- 
quirements must be met by candidates taking their major 
work in chemistry. 

For admission to full graduate standing, candidates for 
advanced degrees in chemistry must have completed gen- 
eral courses equivalent to Chemistry 100, 220, 300A, and 
310 of the Rice Institute and two additional advanced 
courses equivalent to two 400 courses in chemistry of the 
Rice Institute. 

The courses for which graduate credit is given may be 
grouped as follows: 

Group I 

Chemistry 400 Inorganic Chemistry and Chemistry 410A 
Colloid Chemistry 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Chemistry 410 Colloid Chemistry 
Chemistry 450 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 
Chemistry 510 Application of X-ray Diffraction Methods 
Chemistry 520 Selected Topics in Advanced Inorganic 

Chemistry 
Chemical Engineering 405 Unit Operations 
Chemical Engineering 425 Industrial Chemistry and Chemi- 
cal Engineering 435 Thermodynamics 

Group II 

Chemistry 440 Advanced Organic Chemistry 
Chemistry 460 Physiological Chemistry 
Chemistry 540 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 
Chemistry 570 Microchemical Analysis 

In addition to the thesis, candidates for the M.A. degree 
will complete three courses distributed as follows: one 
Group I course, one Group II course, and one approved 300 
or 400 course in mathematics, physics, or biology. 

In addition to the thesis, candidates for the Ph.D. degree 
will complete six courses distributed as follows: if specializ- 
ing in general or physical chemistry, three Group I courses, 
two Group II courses, and Physics 330; if specializing in 
organic chemistry, three Group II courses, two Group I 
courses, and one approved 300 or 400 course in mathematics, 
physics, or biology. Before the beginning of the academic 
year in which the student expects to receive his degree, he 
must satisfy the members of the staff under whom he is 
working that he possesses a reading knowledge of scientific 
French and German. The first week in May of the last year 
of residence, the candidate will be given three-hour written 
examinations in general chemistry and organic chemistry. 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Graduate assistants and fellows who devote as much as 
six hours per week to teaching will, in general, be expected 
to spend two years in residence for the master's degree and 
four years in residence for the doctor's degree. 

Biology ioo. General Biology. About half the year is 
given to the study of human physiology in connection 
with the study of structure, both gross and microscopic. 
A brief survey of the general principles of infection and 
immunity is included. The other half of the year is given 
to a study of morphology, ecology, and embryology, and 
physiology, both animal and plant. The evolutionary point 
of view is presented at the very start and, wherever 
feasible, is made the basis for the presentation or of the 
interpretation of the subject-matter at hand. Emphasis 
is placed on such topics as are of human interest or ap- 
plication. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
period per week. 

M W F 9 :oo Laboratory W Th or F 2 :oo~5 :oo 

Biology 220. Parasitology, and the Biology of Public 
Health. The first part of the year is devoted to a study 
of the relation of insects and their allies to the spread of 
disease, with special emphasis on such important disease 
transmitters as mosquitoes, flies, etc. Following this the 
parasitic worms and protozoa are studied, especially those 
of local importance, causing hookworm disease, malaria, 
syphilis, etc. The final part of the year is devoted to an 
introduction to bacteriology, particularly the sanitary 
aspects of it. A general cultural course for academic 
students and for Sophomore premedical students. 

M W F 9 :oo Laboratory F 2 :oo~5 :oo 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Biology 240. Animal Biology. An introductory course 
in general zoology, including a study of anatomy, physi- 
ology, ecology, and classification of animals. An attempt 
is made to correlate the studies in comparative structure 
and comparative physiology in such a way as to give the 
student a more comprehensive understanding of general 
biological principles. Especial emphasis is laid on the study 
of animal habits, adaptations to environment, economic 
value, and psychology or sense-physiology. The course in- 
cludes discussions of the theories of evolution and current 
trends in biology. 

M W F 1 1 :oo Laboratory T or W 2 :oo~5 :oo 

Biology 290. Physiology and Anatomy, for Physical 
Education students. A study of the structure and func- 
tions of the human body, supplemented in the laboratory 
by anatomical dissections of a mammal with comparisons 
with a human model, and experiments on the physiology 
of the various systems of organs as they are taken up. 
(Alternates with Biology 390.) (Not offered I93 8_ 39-) 

Biology 340. Comparative Anatomy. A study of the 
structure of vertebrate animals, beginning with simple 
forms and leading up to an understanding of mammalian 
anatomy, with emphasis on the origin and phylogenetic 
development of the organs and structures of the human 
body. Designed for premedical students in the Junior or 
Senior year. (Alternates with Biology 470.) 

(Not offered 1938-39.) 

Biology 360. Heredity and Evolution. The first part 
of the course is devoted to a discussion of the principles 

[80] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

of heredity. Whenever practicable, cases of human inherit- 
ance are referred to and used in illustrating or in leading 
to the general principles. Topics discussed and interpreted 
from the viewpoint of genetics are twinning, regeneration, 
development, sexual and asexual reproduction. The study 
of evolution is taken up next. It includes a consideration 
of cosmic and geological evolution, the succession of animal 
and plant forms in time, including man's place in this 
process and his present and possible future evolution. 

M W F 1 1 :oo 

Biology 380. Physiology and Histology. The functions 
of various organs are studied, and correlated with micro- 
scopical structures. Students are familiarized with physio- 
logical apparatus and methods, including the making of 
graphic records. In addition to a systematic study of 
microscopical structures, the usual procedures in histologi- 
cal technique are taught. Recommended for premedical 
students, and for all students specializing in biology. (Al- 
ternates with Biology 450.) 

M W F 10:00 Laboratory T 2:00-5:00 

Biology 390. Hygiene and Public Health. A course of 
lectures for physical education students. Such subjects are 
discussed as the care of the body, infection and resistance, 
epidemiology, care of water, milk and other foods, sewage 
disposal, housing and ventilation, health legislation, social 
problems, vital statistics, etc. (Alternates with Biology 290.) 

T Th S 8 :oo 

Biology 400. Special work. This course will consist of 
advanced work in special fields of biology for students 

[81] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

specializing in the subject, and will be adapted to the 
needs of the particular student. Hours to be arranged. 

Biology 450. General Embryology. A comparative 
study of the early development of animals, with special 
reference to the higher vertebrates. The principles and im- 
portant results of experimental embryology are also dis- 
cussed. Recommended as a course for premedical students. 
(Alternates with Biology 380.) (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Biology 460. Experimental Embryology. This course, 
which includes a review of the more important work done 
in the field, is designed to acquaint the student with the 
problems and methods of the experimental embryologist. 
Each student will be given the opportunity of repeating one 
of these problems in the laboratory. Prerequisite: Biology 
450. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Biology 470. General Bacteriology and Immunology. 
Sterilization, preparation of media, and methods of culti- 
vation; -disinfection; nature and relationships of various 
types of micro-organisms; introduction to bacteriology of 
air, soil, water, sewage, dairy products and other foods, 
and important human, animal, and plant diseases; the prin- 
ciples of immunology and their application to preventive 
and curative medicine. Special emphasis on public health 
and hygienic aspects of the subject. A natural sequence to 
Biology 220. Prerequisites: Biology 100 and Chemistry 
100. (Alternates with Biology 340.) 

T Th S 10:00 Laboratory Th 2:00-5:00 

Biology 500. Experimental Zoology. A review of out- 
standing work being done in various fields of zoology is 

[82] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

included. Especial emphasis is laid on experimental em- 
bryology. Other subjects taken up include animal physiol- 
ogy and experimental interpretation of animal behavior. 
The course is designed for advanced biology students and 
is intended to acquaint them with possibilities of work in 
various experimental fields and to introduce them to meth- 
ods of experimental technique. Prerequisites: Biology 340 
and 450. Hours to be arranged. 

Biology 510. Graduate Research in Genetics. 

Biology 530. Graduate Research in Embryology or 
Physiology. 

Biology 560. Graduate Research in Parasitology. 

To students looking forward to the study of medicine on 
graduation from the Rice Institute, a four years' course is 
available leading to the B.A. degree and meeting the re- 
quirements for entrance to medical college. It is recom- 
mended that premedical students take English 100, Mathe- 
matics ioo, Chemistry 100, Physics 100, and Biology 100 
in the Freshman year. The first four of these would be 
necessary in order to follow through the recommended 
schedule for the succeeding years. In the Sophomore year, 
Chemistry 220 (required by the University of Texas Medical 
School), English 200, German or French 100, Biology 220, 
and Psychology 300 are recommended. The biology and 
psychology courses are optional. The latter course will not 
be open to any Sophomores other than premedical students 
who have passed three science courses in the Freshman year. 
In the Junior year, a second course in a modern language, 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Chemistry 300, and at least one advanced biology course 
are recommended. In the Senior year, an additional chem- 
istry course and one or two advanced biology courses should 
be taken. It is highly desirable that prospective medical 
students should obtain sufficient knowledge of French and 
of German to enable them to read scientific literature in 
those languages. 

Psychology 300. General Introduction to Psychology. 
In this course both the introspective and the behavioristic 
approaches to the subject are taken into account. The lec- 
tures will be supplemented by demonstrations and class 
experiments. The main topics discussed are: the physiology 
of the nervous system and the sense-organs, reflexes, in- 
stinctive activity, sensation and perception, feeling and 
emotion, memory, learning, intelligent behavior, and person- 
ality. Near the end of the course a survey will be given of 
one or two special fields of the subject, such as animal psy- 
chology or abnormal psychology. This course presupposes a 
certain amount of elementary training in the fundamental 
sciences of biology and physics ; it is strongly advised, though 
not at present required, that students take Biology 100 
either before or concurrently with this course. T Th S 10:00 

Psychology 400. Social and Abnormal Psychology. In 
the first half-year the subject will be social psychology; in 
the second, abnormal psychology. Beginning in September 
and continuing for half of the academic year, there will be 
laboratory exercises on sensation, perception, association 
and memory, feeling and emotion, and the measurement of 
intelligence and personality. 

M W F 12:00 Laboratory (day to be arranged) 2:00-5:00 

[84] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Economics ioo. A general course of introductory nature 
designed to prepare for economic studies. The work in- 
cludes readings, lectures, and discussions in economic 
history, concepts and elements of economic theory, busi- 
ness organization, statistical methods, accounting, and 
business finance. This course is planned primarily for 
students of physical education. M W F 8:00 

Economics 200. Elements of Economics. An intro- 
ductory course analyzing and interpreting our present 
economic system. The first half-year is devoted to a study 
of the traditional principles of economics, modified in the 
light of recent developments. During the second half-year 
the principles of economics are applied to current economic 
problems, such as marketing, banking, business organiza- 
tion, taxation, transportation, consumer's problems, etc. 

T Th S 1 1 :oo 

Economics 330. Economic and Social Reform Move- 
ments. This course is devoted to the study of economic 
and social reform movements and economic progress from 
early times to the present. Various reform movements, both 
in Europe and in the United States, are studied and criti- 
cally analyzed in the light of contemporary conditions. 
Throughout the year the student is kept in contact with 
current economic and social reform problems by means of 
class discussions and readings in current periodical litera- 
ture. Prerequisite: Economics 200. M W F 10:00 

Economics 450. Transportation. The first half-year is 
devoted to a study of the history of transportation and the 
development of common carrier regulation. During the 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

second half-year a careful analysis is made of such problems 
as rates and rate making, intercorporate relationships, regu- 
lation of security issues, construction and abandonments, 
and railway labor problems. Special attention is given to 
highway, inland waterway, airway, and pipe line transpor- 
tation. Prerequisites : Economics 200 and Business Adminis- 
tration 200, or the consent of the instructor. T Th S 9:00 

Sociology 200. An Introduction to Sociology. The 
course includes an analysis of the geographical and bi- 
ological factors in social evolution, social psychology, and 
a study of the functions of citizenship. There is added 
a rapid survey of modern social problems such as those 
of poverty, industry, immigration, public health, and de- 
linquency. Students expecting to take this course are 
advised to take Biology 100, one course in college history, 
and Economics 200. M W F 1 1 :oo 

Business Administration 200. An Introduction to 
Business Management. The course follows the generally 
accepted theory that the study of accounting principles and 
methods furnishes the most satisfactory approach to a 
knowledge of business administration. After the principles 
developed in connection with the sole-proprietorship have 
been applied to the partnership and corporate forms of 
business enterprise, the course introduces such special sub- 
jects as sinking funds and reserves, segregation of surpluses, 
manufacturing accounts and statements, buying, manu- 
facturing and financial control, installment, consignment 
and branch sales, negotiable instruments, the principles of 
valuation, internal organization for control, and the inter- 
pretation of financial and operating statements. While the 

[86] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

course is primarily accounting, the organization and pro- 
cedure of modern business are emphasized throughout. 

T Th S 8 :oo or 9 :oo 

Business Administration 210. This course is planned 
along the same lines as Business Administration 200 but 
is open only to those who have had the background offered 
in Economics 100. M W F 8:00 

Business Administration 300. Money and Banking. 
History of the currency. Organization and regulation of 
commercial and investment banks. The Federal Reserve 
System. Credit and instruments of credit, corporate securi- 
ties, capitalization, reorganization, depreciation, and re- 
serves. Open to students who have completed Business 
Administration 200 or Economics 200. M W F 9 :oo 

Business Administration 400. Advanced Accounting 
and Auditing. The course covers such subjects as the con- 
struction and interpretation of financial and operating 
statements, valuation of assets and liabilities, sinking funds, 
surpluses and reserves, budgeting, application of funds, 
analysis of changes in rates of profit, accounting for estates 
and trusts, municipal accounts, the liquidation and disso- 
lution of partnerships and corporations, consolidation and 
combination, and consolidation of financial and operating 
statements. The course closes with a study of the theory 
and practice of modern auditing. The course is designed to 
meet the needs of the general business or legal student as 
well as the student who contemplates a possible career as a 
corporation comptroller or auditor, or as a certified public 
accountant. M W F 1 1 :oo 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Education 310. The History of Education. First half- 
year: a survey of educational thought and practice from 
ancient to modern times. Second half-year: a study of 
American educational institutions in particular. The course 
is divided into sixteen units which are organized around 
basic points of view and their institutional expressions. 
The units in American education include the grammar 
school, the academy, the common school, the high school, 
the college, and the university. Recommended: History 
100 or Philosophy 300. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

M WF8:oo 



Education 410. Basic Principles in Secondary Educa- 
tion. The first half-year: the work is organized around the 
contrast between the learning-product and the learning- 
process approaches to educational problems with special 
attention to H. C. Morrison's statement of the former and 
John Dewey's of the latter. A term paper on the Morri- 
son "unit" is required. The second half-year: a continua- 
tion of the Morrison-Dewey contrast with special attention 
to Gestalt theory, idealism, pragmatism, and realism. Some 
past and present writers on curriculum are considered. The 
curriculum problem is traced from Herbart through Ziller, 
Stoy, Frick, F. W. Parker, S. C. Parker, Charles Judd, and 
H. C. Morrison to some of the more recent writers on the 
subject. A short introduction to the various theories of 
testing pupil progress is included in connection with note- 
book and workbook assignments. Recommended: Philoso- 
phy 310 or 320. Prerequisite: Psychology 300. 

M W F 11 :oo or 12:00 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The Department of Education of the State of Texas will 
grant, under the Certificate Law of 192 1, the following 
certificates to students of the Institute: 

1. Four-year Elementary Certificate. An elementary 
certificate valid for four years will be granted to students 
who have satisfactorily completed five full courses, one of 
which must be in education and bear on elementary teach- 
ing, another of which must be in English, and of which not 
more than two courses are in the same subject. 

2. Six-year Elementary Certificate. An elementary cer- 
tificate valid for six years will be granted to those who have 
satisfactorily completed two full years of college work, in- 
cluding two full courses in education. 

3. Permanent Elementary Certificate. A permanent 
elementary certificate will be granted to the holders of 
the six-year certificates after five years of successful 
teaching or after four years of successful teaching and 
one year of college work taken after the issuance of the 
certificate. 

4. Two-year High-School Certificate. A high-school 
certificate valid for two years (valid only in the elementary 
grades and in third-class and unclassified high schools) will 
be granted to any student who has completed five full 
college courses, one of which is in education, another of 
which is in English, and not more than two of which are 
in any one subject. 

5. Four-year High-School Certificate. A high-school 
certificate valid for four years will be granted to any 
student who completes two years of college work, including 
two courses in education, one of which bears on high- 
school teaching. 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

6. Permanent High-School Certificate. A permanent 
high-school certificate will be granted to those who have a 
B.A. degree (or any equivalent Bachelor's degree or higher 
academic degree) and have had two full courses in educa- 
tion, one of which bears on high-school teaching, and who 
have completed three years (27 months) of successful teach- 
ing subsequent to taking the degree. 

It should be noted that high-school certificates are valid 
for the elementary grades and the holder of an elementary 
certificate, based on two years of college work, can teach 
in third-class and unclassified high schools. 

Certificates which are expiring may be renewed repeat- 
edly by completing six semester hours of college work in 
any college or university recognized as first-class by the 
State Department of Education, provided the certificate 
has not expired by the beginning of the summer term 
during which the said work is done. 

Attention should also be called to the fact that a college 
course in "Constitutions" is required for the issuance of a 
teacher's certificate in Texas. History 310 is planned to 
meet this requirement. 

Students expecting to secure the Institute's recommen- 
dation for a teaching position should consult the depart- 
ment offering the work of their primary interest in order 
that their course of study may be properly planned. 



History 100. Foundations of Western Civilization. This 
course is intended as an introduction to historical methods 
of thinking, and includes a survey of human achievement 
from prehistoric times through antiquity and the Middle 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Ages to the early modern period. The chief emphasis is 
placed on the contributions of the Greeks and Romans. 

T Th S 8 :oo 

History 250. English History. A survey tracing the 
development of the English people, from their origins to 
the present, with emphasis upon imperial expansion and 
upon the evolution of those social, economic, and political 
forms and concepts which have basically influenced Western 
civilization. This course is especially recommended to stu- 
dents preparing for the study of law. M W F 8:00 

History 300. History of the United States. A survey 
of the growth of the American nation, with attention to 
such major developments as the establishment of the fed- 
erative republic, westward expansion and the dominance of 
frontier attitudes, the growth of democracy, the triumph 
of nationalism over sectionalism, and the transition from 
agrarianism to industrialism. Recommended to students 
preparing for the study of law. Open to Juniors who have 
completed one college course in history or economics. 

T Th S 1 1 :oo 

History 310. American Government. A study of the 
history and operation of constitutional government in the 
United States with special emphasis on the historical back- 
ground of the Federal government, the structure of the 
government, the formation of public policy, and the con- 
duct of public business. For additional background and for 
contrast, reference is made to English constitutional history 
and to the present structure of the English government. 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

This year course in American government, planned for the 
general student of government, is also designed to enable 
prospective lawyers, physicians, and teachers to meet the 
state requirement of a course in "Constitutions." 

M W F 10:00 

History 320. The Development of European Culture, 
300-1500. This course traces the evolution of Western 
European civilization from the decline of the Roman Em- 
pire to the Sixteenth Century, with special reference to the 
antique Graeco-Roman basis. Byzantine and Mohammedan 
contributions to the Latin West will also be considered. 
Recommended: Philosophy 300 or Architecture 510. 

T Th S 10:00 

History 330. Mediaeval Literature. This course consists 
of a general survey of mediaeval literature, including chron- 
icles and histories, the romances and epic cycles, and lyric 
poetry. Attention is also given to the evolution of the 
Latin language in the Middle Ages, to the classical literary 
background, and to the preservation of letters in manu- 
scripts and libraries. The subject-matter is considered from 
the historical point of view. An elementary knowledge of 
Latin is a prerequisite to this course. (Alternates with 
History 320.) (Not offered 1938-39.) 

History 400. Economic and Social History of the South. 
A study of the life and economic status of the Southern 
people from the Colonial period to the present. Dominant 
forces and institutions of the Old South, such as the south- 
ern frontier, the plantation, slavery, and sectionalism, re- 
ceive equal attention with the racial, sectional, agrarian, 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

and industrial problems of the post-war period. Prerequi- 
site: History 300 or the special consent of the instructor. 

T Th S 12:00 

History 420. Mediaeval Latin. Survey and translation 
of typical mediaeval sources. The selections are studied 
from the point of view of historical significance and of 
literary appreciation. Also intensive reading and reports 
on special topics in mediaeval literature and intellectual 
history. This course is intended for students of history and 
the modern languages who desire to acquire some familiarity 
with ordinary mediaeval Latin texts. Open only to ad- 
vanced students after consultation with the instructor. 

(Not offered 1938-39.) 

History 520. Topics in Legal History and Political 
Theory. Research course in the legal and literary sources, 
based on translation work and reports. The subject of 
investigation for the current year is the problem of sov- 
ereignty and allegiance in Roman and Germanic political 
thought, with special attention to the Yisigothic codes. 
Open to properly qualified students after consultation with 
the instructor. F 2 :oo-5 :oo 

Jurisprudence 300. An Elementary Course in Juris- 
prudence. The course is planned to give the student a 
knowledge of the history of the development and of the 
philosophy of law, together with a knowledge of the 
essentials of selected divisions of modern law, including 
criminal law, torts, contracts, agency, bailments, sales, and 
negotiable instruments. T Th S 8:00 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Philosophy 210. Introduction to Philosophy. This 
course combines an elementary analysis of the fundamental 
principles of deductive and inductive logic with an intro- 
ductory study of the development of moral ideas and of 
the problems of morality in our civilization. 

M W F 9 :oo or T Th S 11 .00 

Philosophy 300. History of Philosophy. An historical 
survey of the essential features and main currents of 
philosophical thought, ancient, mediaeval, and modern. 

T Th S 9 :oo 

Philosophy 320. Contemporary Philosophy. An analy- 
sis and criticism of current philosophical problems, with 
special emphasis on theories of knowledge in their historical 
setting. M W F 10:00 

Philosophy 330. General Logic. This course is designed 
to give the student a more critical grasp of traditional logic 
in the light of some modern advances, with particular at- 
tention to recent mathematical developments in logic. 

M W F 1 1 :oo 

Philosophy 340. Modern Empiricism. A survey of the 
development of empirical and scientific method from Fran- 
cis Bacon, through Hobbes, (DesCartes), Locke, Berkeley, 
Hume, and subsequent positivism, to the present. 

(Not offered 1938-39.) 

Philosophy 400. Philosophy of Religion. An historical- 
critical study of the main problems of religion, dealing 
more especially with the belief in God, the idea of im- 
mortality, and the problem of evil. T Th S 12:00 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Philosophy 410. Aesthetics. A study of the nature and 
significance of aesthetic experience, its relation to the other 
activities of human culture, intellectual, moral, religious; 
the main philosophical theories of beauty and art, with 
particular attention to poetics and the principles of literary 
criticism. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Philanthropy 300. Social Problems. An intensive 
treatment of the following topics: child welfare, immigra- 
tion, recreation, delinquency and crime, public health, 
and housing. This course aims to equip the student of 
social activities as well as the prospective social worker 
with a knowledge of important types of social maladjust- 
ment. Prerequisites: Economics 200, one course in college 
history, and Sociology 200. M W F 10:00 

Philanthropy 400. A course designed to train the 
student for professional social work. It includes the his- 
tory of public and private relief, the functions of the more 
important social agencies, and the technique of social 
diagnosis and treatment. Theoretical instruction in the 
case method will be accompanied by field work under 
the direction of experts connected with the social agencies 
of the city of Houston. This course is limited to advanced 
students who are expecting to undertake professional social 
work. M W F 9:00 

PHYSICAL TRAINING AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

The equipment of the athletic field house not only 
makes provision for the university athletic teams but also 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

affords opportunity for systematic physical training on the 
part of other members of the institution. Facilities in 
or near the field house are available for basketball, football, 
track and field work, baseball, handball, tennis, golf, and 
other athletic and recreative games. 

Physical Training. All men entering the Institute for 
the first time are required to take a year's course in physical 
training. This course, Physical Training ioo, is also open 
to any other male student in the Institute. Students 
participating in intercollegiate athletics will receive appro- 
priate credit for the duration of their participation. How- 
ever, the required course offers a programme of games and 
intramural sports for those who are not competing in inter- 
collegiate athletics but for whom the benefits of recreation, 
exercise, and athletic competition are also desirable. 

The certificate of medical examination required of a stu- 
dent on admission will determine in a large measure the 
character of the work that the individual student is per- 
mitted to take. In certain special cases, a supplementary 
physical examination may be required. In cases where the 
student is physically or organically unfit for a normal pro- 
gramme of physical activity, he will be assigned to a restricted 
exercise group where special activities will be made to serve 
his needs. In all cases, the work will be so organized as to 
eliminate direct competition between the physically weaker 
and the physically stronger among the students. 

For this physical training, a fee of sixteen dollars, payable 
at registration time, is required, entitling the student during 
his residence as an undergraduate to the use of the field 
house and playing fields, to the use of a complete gymna- 

[96] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

sium uniform (excepting only gymnasium shoes, which are 
also required) and towels, and to laundry service for the 
preceding items of equipment. 

Physical Training ioo. This course is designed to teach 
the student skill in various forms of athletic and recreative 
games and contests. Required of all men in the Freshman 
class and transfers who have not had the equivalent else- 
where. Three hours each week. Hours to be arranged. 

Physical Education. The Rice Institute offers a four 
years' course in health and physical education and recrea- 
tion leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physi- 
cal Education, designed to prepare men for careers in 
health and physical education, including coaching, in high 
schools and colleges, municipal recreation departments, and 
other similar organizations. In each of its four years there 
is a required course in physical education, and, in the 
last two years, courses in education which are necessary 
for a state teacher's certificate. The required work in 
biology and chemistry serves not only as a basis for the work 
in physical education, but also affords further subjects for 
high-school teaching. The laboratory work in these science 
courses is held in the morning hours, in order not to inter- 
fere with physical education laboratory work in the after- 
noons. Considerable emphasis is placed on economics and 
business administration for the benefit of those who ulti- 
mately, if not immediately, go into business. Students 
looking forward to medicine or law are permitted to make 
substitutions enabling them to meet the ordinary premedi- 
cal and prelegal requirements. 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

The schedule of the four years' course in physical educa- 
tion is as follows: 

First Year 
(i) English ioo 

(2) French, German, or Spanish 

(3) Chemistry no 

(4) Economics 100 

(5) Physical Education 100 

Second Year 

(1) English 210 

(2) French, German, or Spanish 1 

(3) Biology 100 

(4) Business Administration 210 

(5) Physical Education 200 

Third Year 

(1) Biology 290 

(2) Physical Education 300 2 

(3) Physical Education 310 
(4 _ 5) Two other subjects 3 

Fourth Year 

(1) Biology 390 

(2) Physical Education 400 2 
(3-5) Three other subjects 3 

J The language begun in the first year should be continued. 

2 Practice teaching must be completed during either the Junior or 
Senior year. 

3 Students planning to enter public school work should elect education 
in the third and fourth years and History 310 in the fourth year. 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Physical Education ioo. Three lectures and six lab- 
oratory hours weekly. An introductory course to the pro- 
fessional study of health and physical education, and rec- 
reation. The laboratory periods will be devoted to intensive 
instruction in a wide variety of games. M W F 10:00 

Physical Education 200. Three lectures and six lab- 
oratory hours weekly. This course deals with fundamentals 
of health and physical education, foundation of methods in 
health and physical education, and playground and com- 
munity recreation. The laboratory periods will be devoted 
to intensive instruction in a wide variety of games. 

TThS 8:00 

Physical Education 300. Three lectures and six lab- 
oratory hours weekly. This course includes the study of 
body mechanics, individual physical education, and tests 
and measurements in health and physical education. The 
laboratory periods will be devoted to intensive instruction 
in a wide variety of games, and to practice teaching in 
health and physical education. T Th S 10.00 

Physical Education 310. Three lectures weekly. The 
first half-year is devoted to a study of general psychology, 
the history of the development of the various schools of 
psychological thought and a consideration of the psychology 
of childhood and adolescence. The second half-year is de- 
voted to a study of the principles of educational psychology 
and the educational implications of recent developments in 
biology and sociology with special reference to materials 
and methods in teaching health and physical education 
and recreation. M W F 10:00 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Physical Education 400. Three lectures and six lab- 
oratory hours weekly. This course deals with the principles 
of organization and administration of programmes of 
health and physical education and recreation. The lab- 
oratory periods will be devoted to intensive instruction in 
a wide variety of games, and to practice teaching in health 
and physical education. T Th S 11:00 

Physical Education 410. Health and Physical Educa- 
tion in Elementary and Secondary Schools. This course is 
designed for prospective teachers who desire certification 
in physical education by the State Department of Educa- 
tion in Texas. It includes a study of the purpose, content, 
and methods of instruction in a programme of health and 
physical education in the elementary and secondary schools. 
Offered during the second half-year. Given in 1938-39 and 
in alternate years thereafter. 

To meet this requirement in full, students taking this 
half-year course should also have credit in Biology 100. 

T Th S 12:00 

COURSES IN ENGINEERING 

Courses are offered in chemical, civil, electrical, and 
mechanical engineering. A complete course in any one 
of these branches extends over five years. A student 
who has successfully completed the first four years of a 
course is awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in a 
specified branch of engineering, and after successfully com- 
pleting the remaining year of his course he is awarded the 
degree of Ch.E., C.E., E.E., or M.E. Students with high 

f 100] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

standing may receive the M.S. degree in a specified branch 
of engineering under the same requirements as for the M.A. 
degree. No student is admitted to a fifth year schedule 
without the approval of the head of the department in 
which he is specializing. It is intended in the engineering 
courses to pay special attention to the theoretical side, 
because experience has shown that theoretical knowledge is 
difficult to obtain after leaving the university, and without 
it a rapid rise in the profession of engineering is almost im- 
possible. It is recommended that students obtain employ- 
ment in engineering work during the summer vacations, for 
it should be remembered that no amount of university work 
can take the place of practical experience in engineering 
establishments and in the field. The courses in engineering 
are not intended to take the place of learning by practical 
experience, but are designed to supply a knowledge of the 
fundamental principles and scientific methods on which the 
practice of engineering is based and without which it is 
difficult, if not impossible, to succeed in the practice of the 
profession. The work of the first year is alike for all branches, 
in order that students may defer choice of a particular engi- 
neering course as long as possible. It is necessary for chem- 
ical engineers to make this choice at the beginning of the 
second year, civil engineers at the beginning of the third 
year, and electrical and mechanical engineers at the middle 
of the third year. 

The work of the first two years consists chiefly of courses 
in pure and applied mathematics, physics, chemistry, and 
other subjects, an adequate knowledge of which is ab- 
solutely necessary before the more technical courses can 
be pursued with advantage. Technical work is begun in 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

the third year with courses of a general character in 
mechanical engineering, civil engineering, and electrical 
engineering, all three of these branches to be taken by all 
engineering students, with a slight change in schedule for 
those in chemical engineering. In the third year instruc- 
tion of students in mechanical and electrical engineering 
is begun in shopwork. The classes in shopwork are in- 
tended to give familiarity with workshop methods. The 
object of these classes is not primarily to train students 
to become skilled mechanics, but to provide such knowl- 
edge of shop methods as is desirable for those who may 
be expected as engineers to design machinery, to employ 
mechanics, and to superintend manufacturing processes. 

Students who can afford the time are recommended to 
devote three or four years to preliminary work instead 
of two, taking the B.A. at the end of four years and an 
engineering degree at the end of six or seven years. Stu- 
dents proposing to do this are advised to take a course 
devoted largely to mathematics, physics, and chemistry, 
or an honours course in either mathematics, physics, or 
chemistry. The subjects taken during the years of pre- 
paratory work must include those of the first two years in 
the general engineering course, which may be substituted 
for options in the academic course. The honours course 
in physics is strongly recommended for those who wish to 
become either electrical or mechanical engineers. 

The Southwest affords ample opportunities for the prac- 
tice of engineering in its several branches, but these oppor- 
tunities call for well-informed and thoroughly trained 
scientific workers. It is with such a double object in view 
that the engineering courses scheduled and described below 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

have been designed and developed under actual experience 
of some twenty years. These programmes of study and 
training have justified themselves, for the engineering 
graduates, chemical, civil, electrical, and mechanical, of this 
institution are successfully engaged in professional work in 
many parts of the country, and especially in the Southwest. 

In particular, for example, more than half of the Rice 
Institute graduates in engineering are identified with some 
phase of the petroleum industry and allied industrial enter- 
prises. Nor is this surprising, and for two reasons: first, the 
petroleum industry is by far the major industry of this 
vicinity, and second, the courses in science and engineering 
offered at the Rice Institute have been found to provide 
first-rate preparation for the practice of petroleum engineer- 
ing. Such successful application of these courses was to 
have been anticipated because the petroleum industry's 
problems of exploration and discovery call for physics and 
electrical engineering, those of production and manufacture 
for mechanical engineering, those of transportation and 
storage for civil engineering, while chemist and chemical 
engineer man the research laboratories of the industry 
from which issue its processes of refining and the manufac- 
ture of its manifold by-products. 

The following are the schedules for the five years' course 
leading to a bachelor's degree in four years and an engineer- 
ing degree in five years: 

First Year 
(i) Mathematics ioo (4) Chemistry 100 

(2) Physics 100 (5) Engineering no 

(3) English 100 

[ 103] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Second Year 

MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, AND CIVIL ENGINEERING 

(i) Mathematics 200 or 210 

(2) Engineering 230A (first half-year) 
Mathematics 22OA or 230A (second half-year) 

(3) Physics 200 

(4) Business Administration 200 

(5) Engineering 240 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Mathematics 200 or 210 

(2) Mathematics 220A (first half-year) 
Engineering 230B (second half-year) 

(3) Physics 200 

(4) German 100 

(5) Chemistry 220 

Third Year 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Mathematics 300A (first half-year) 
English 380 (second half-year) 

(2) Mechanical Engineering 300 

(3) Mechanical Engineering 310 

(4) Electrical Engineering 300 

(5) Civil Engineering 30OA and 300B 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Mathematics 300 

(2) Mechanical Engineering 300 

(3) Mechanical Engineering 310 

[ 104] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

(4) Electrical Engineering 300 

(5) Civil Engineering 300A and 300B 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

(1) Mathematics 300A (first half-year) 
English 380 (second half-year) 

(2) Mechanical Engineering 300 

(3) Electrical Engineering 330 

(4) Civil Engineering 300A and 300B 

(5) Civil Engineering 320A and 320B 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Chemistry 300A 

(2) Chemistry 310 

(3) Chemical Engineering 305-315 

(4) Mechanical Engineering 330 (first half-year) 
Civil Engineering 330 (second half-year) 

(5) Economics 200 

Fourth Year 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Senior Mechanical Laboratory (M.E. 400) 

(2) Machine Design (M.E. 410) 

(3) Heat Engines (M.E. 420) 

(4) Industrial Management (M.E. 430), or an approved 
elective 

(5) Engineering Materials, and Internal Combustion En- 
gines and Fuels (M.E. 440) 

(6) Economics 200 

(7) Mechanical Processes (M.E. 450) 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

(i) Circuit Analysis (E.E. 400) 

(2) Direct and Alternating Current Machinery (E.E. 410) 

(3) Electric and Magnetic Fields and Electrical Machine 
Design (E.E. 420) 1 

Theoretical Electrical Engineering (E.E. 430) 
Electrical Communication (E.E. 440) 

(4) Advanced Electrical Engineering Laboratory (E.E. 

450) 

(5) Industrial Management (M.E. 430) 

(6) Economics 200 

(7) English 380 (second half-year) 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

(1) Municipal Engineering (C.E. 420) 

(2) Masonry Construction (C.E. 440) 

(3) Graphic Statics and Structural Design (C.E. 450) 

(4) Approved elective 

(5) Economics 200 

(6) Seminar (Engineering 400) 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Colloid Chemistry (Ch. 410A) (first half-year) 
English 380 (second half-year) 

(2) Inorganic Chemistry (Ch. 400) or Advanced Organic 
Chemistry (Ch. 440) (first half-year) 

Plant Design (Ch.E. 415) (second half-year) 

(3) Unit Operations (Ch.E. 405) 

(4) Industrial Chemistry (Ch.E. 425) (first half-year) 
Thermodynamics (Ch.E. 435) (second half-year) 

^ne course to be elected from E.E. 420, 430, and 440. 
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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

(5) Direct and Alternating Current Machinery and Cir- 
cuits (E.E. 330) 

(6) Chemical Literature; History of Chemistry (Ch. 480) 

Fifth Year 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Advanced Machine Design (M.E. 500) 

(2) Mechanical Plants and Processes (M.E. 510) 

(3) Thesis (M.E. 530) 

(4) Seminar (Engineering 400) 

(5) Approved elective 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Advanced Circuit Analysis (E.E. 500) 

(2) Thesis (E.E. 510) 

(3) Heat Engines (M.E. 420) or Machine Design (M.E. 
410) 

(4) Approved electrical engineering elective 

(5) Approved elective 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

(1) Structural Design (C.E. 500) 

(2) Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering (C.E. 510) 

(3) Railway Engineering (C.E. 520) 

(4) Approved elective 

(5) Thesis (C.E. 530) 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

(1) Experimental Problem and Thesis (Ch.E. 475) 

(2) Advanced Unit Operations and Plant Design (Ch.E. 
505) 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

(3) Elective (an advanced course in chemistry, chemical 
engineering, physics, or mathematics) 

(4) Approved engineering elective 

(5) Seminar (Engineering 400) 

Engineering iio. Mechanical Drawing and Descrip- 
tive Geometry. Mechanical Drawing: the use of drafting 
instruments; lettering; drawing figures in isometric, cabinet, 
and orthographic projection; intersections and develop- 
ments. Descriptive Geometry: orthographic projections of 
points, lines, planes, warped surfaces, etc., in the four 
angles of projection. T Th 8:00 

Section 1: M and W 10:00-1:00 
Section 2 : M and W 2 .-00-5 :oo 
Section 3 : T and Th 2 :oo-5 :oo 

Engineering 230A. Plane surveying. The study of the 
theory of plane surveying and practice in the uses of survey- 
ing instruments and of office methods. Problems to famil- 
iarize the student with transit, level, tape, compass, and 
plane table. Plotting of notes and computation of courses, 
areas, and volumes of earthwork. (First half-year.) Pre- 
requisites: Engineering no and Mathematics 100. 

M W F 8 :oo M W 2 :oo~5 :oo 

Engineering 230B. Engineering Mechanics. Systems 
of concurrent and non-concurrent forces. Couples, vectors, 
and vectorial sums. Center of gravity and moment of 
inertia of areas and volumes. Friction, work, and energy. 
Angular movements, momentum and impulse. (Second half- 
year.) Prerequisites: Engineering no, Physics 100, and 
registration in Mathematics 200 or 210. T Th S 8:00 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Engineering 240. Kinematics of Machines and Engi- 
neering Mechanics. 

Kinematics of Machines. The study of relative motion 
of parts of machines, instant centers, velocities, gearing 
and wrapping connectors. (Approximately the first twelve 
weeks of the year.) 

Engineering Mechanics. Statics and dynamics. Systems 
of concurrent and non-concurrent forces. Couples, vectors, 
and vectorial sums. Centroids and moments of inertia of 
areas and bodies. Friction, work, and energy. Applications 
of Newton's second law in problems of translation, rota- 
tion, and plane motion of rigid bodies. Impulse and mo- 
mentum. (Remaining twenty-four weeks of the year fol- 
lowing Kinematics.) 

Prerequisites: Engineering no, Physics 100, and regis- 
tration in Mathematics 200 or 210. 

T Th S 1 1 :oo T 2 .00-5 :oo 

Engineering 400. Seminar. A course devoted to the 
purpose of training engineering students in collecting and 
presenting orally formal papers and discussions on topics 
of general engineering interest. The papers and discussions 
are given by the students, using acceptable material secured 
from technical periodicals or transactions. The course 
meets weekly and is conducted in the form of an engineer- 
ing society meeting. Open to others who have the necessary 
engineering background. F 2 :oo-~5 :oo 

Mechanical Engineering 300. Elementary Heat 
Power. A general course of lectures, recitations from text, 
and laboratory covering the characteristics, fields of useful- 
ness, operation, and tests of fuels, steam engines and tur- 

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bines, boilers, pumps, condensers, and auxiliaries; properties 
of steam; valve gears; simple internal combustion engines 
and accessories. Numerous problems illustrate the theory 
discussed. Prerequisites: Full Junior standing and Physics 
ioo, Chemistry ioo, and Kinematics. One laboratory fort- 
nightly. M W F 1 0:00 M 2:00-5:00 or T 10:00-1 :oo 

Mechanical Engineering 310. Engineering Shop. 
Textbook and lectures dealing with metallurgy, general 
forge, foundry, welding, heat-treating, and machine-shop 
practice, and their effects on machine design and manu- 
facturing. Practice with a variety of bench and machine 
tools, carefully selected for their fitness in illustrating the 
principles studied, for affording actual contact with machine 
work, and for developing a certain degree of skill and re- 
sourcefulness in the student. Prerequisites: Full Junior 
standing and Engineering 240. 

Recitations, all sections, T Th S 9:00 
Shop Section A: T Th S 10:00-12:00 
Shop Section B : Th F 2 :oo~5 :oo 

Mechanical Engineering 330. Heat Machinery. A 
half-year course for chemical engineering students only. 
Elementary thermodynamics of vapors; characteristics and 
operation of power plant equipment. Prerequisites: Full 
Junior standing and Physics 100. One laboratory fort- 
nightly. 

M W F 11 :ooor 1 2 :ooT 2:00-5:00 or Th or S 10:00-1:00 

Mechanical Engineering 400. Senior Mechanical 
Laboratory. An advanced course in general steam, air, 
oil, water, and power-transmission machinery operation 

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and testing. Recitations from text, reports, and labora- 
tory. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 300. Must be 
accompanied or preceded by Mechanical Engineering 420. 

T W 2 100-5 :oo 

Mechanical Engineering 410. Machine Design. Reci- 
tations from text and references, also calculations and 
drafting involved in the design of machine parts, consid- 
ering both the theory and its modifications due to shop 
practice and financial limitations. Design of several com- 
plete assemblies, such as crown blocks, brakes, or trans- 
mission units used in the oil-fields. Prerequisites: Engineer- 
ing 240, Mathematics 220A or 230A, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 310, and Civil Engineering 300A and b. 

M W F 10:00-1 :oo 

Mechanical Engineering 420. Heat Engines. Gen- 
eral thermodynamics; applications of thermodynamics to 
the design and operation of air compressors, steam engines 
and steam turbines; commercial forms of such machines, 
with special emphasis on steam turbines; elementary 
steam plant design; elementary refrigeration. Lectures, 
text, and problems. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 
300. M W F 9 :oo 

Mechanical Engineering 430. Industrial Manage- 
ment. A study of the principles and practice in the man- 
agement of manufacturing plants; location and layout of 
works; organization of administration, sales, cost, and pro- 
duction departments; selection of machinery, materials, 
and labor; wage system; cost analysis; welfare work; a 
short survey of the law of sales and contracts. This course 

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is designed especially to meet the needs of electrical and 
mechanical engineers and should be preceded by Mechani- 
cal Engineering 310 and Business Administration 200. Two 
recitations a week. Senior elective. T Th 10:00 

Mechanical Engineering 440. Engineering Materials, 
and Internal Combustion Engines and Fuels. Engineering 
materials: a brief study from current references of the 
metallurgy, physical properties, applications, and com- 
mercial forms of metals, alloys, protective coatings, and 
important non-metallic materials, emphasizing those fea- 
tures most interesting to the design and application engi- 
neer. Internal combustion engines and fuels: a study of the 
theory, design, and operation of gasoline, gas, and oil- 
burning engines for automotive, stationary, and marine 
service, including the production and characteristics of the 
fuels used. Must be accompanied or preceded by Mechani- 
cal Engineering 420 and Civil Engineering 300A and B 

T Th S 8 :oo 

Mechanical Engineering 450. Mechanical Processes. 
Each student investigates and reports orally on specific 
mechanical processes or equipments, securing his data from 
the library or other specified sources. Inspection trips and 
special lectures. Prerequisite: Credit or enrollment in Me- 
chanical Engineering 410 and 420. F 2:00-5:00 

Mechanical Engineering 490. Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Problems. If conditions are favorable, mechanical en- 
gineering students may elect at least nine hours a week in 
approved investigations or designs under the direction of a 
member of the staff. 

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Mechanical Engineering 500. A study of Funda- 
mental Principles in Advanced Strength of Materials, 
Kinematics, and Machine Design. Analytical and graphical 
analyses are applied to problems of stress concentrations, 
of balance and vibration, and of stress due to dynamical 
causes. Comparison is made with experimental results. 
The mechanical properties of metals are emphasized in 
problems involving fatigue, high temperatures, strain, 
hardening, etc. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 410. 

Mechanical Engineering 510. Mechanical Plants and 
Processes. A general course dealing with special plants 
and processes, such as oil production, transportation, and 
refining, textiles, metal products, material handling, re- 
frigeration, not covered thoroughly in other courses. 
Details of design and operation of special power and heating 
plants. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 420. 

Mechanical Engineering 530. Thesis. The investi- 
gation, under direction of the staff, of some undeveloped 
engineering problem, either through experiment, design, 
or compilation of available information. The time re- 
quired will be at least that necessary for a standard ad- 
vanced course. Two copies of the accepted report will be 
required for deposit in the Institute library. 

Electrical Engineering 300. Introduction to Direct 
and Alternating Current Machinery and Circuits. The 
fundamental principles of electrical engineering for electri- 
cal and mechanical engineering students. Prerequisites: 
Full Junior standing and Physics 200 and Mathematics 200 
or 210. Laboratory fortnightly. 

M W F 9 :oo M or T 2 :oo-5 :oo 

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Electrical Engineering 330. Introduction to Direct 
and Alternating Current Machinery and Circuits. The 
fundamental principles of electrical engineering designed to 
meet the special needs of chemical and civil engineering 
students. Prerequisites: Full Junior standing and Physics 
200 and Mathematics 200 or 210. Laboratory fortnightly. 

M W F 9:00 T or S 10:00-1 :oo 

Electrical Engineering 400. Circuit Analysis. Funda- 
mental alternating current theory applied to linear, lumped 
constant, and distributed constant circuits. Applications of 
the complex variable to alternating current theory. The 
generalized four-terminal network and the reduction of 
transformers, transmission lines, etc., to four-terminal net- 
works. Fourier series applied to circuit theory. Introduc- 
tion to symmetrical components, filter circuits, and tran- 
sient analysis. Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 300 
and Mathematics 300 or 310. M W F 10:00 

Electrical Engineering 410. Direct and Alternating 
Current Machinery. Engineering Electronics. Theory of 
direct and alternating current machinery and calculation of 
their characteristics, together with the theory of electronic 
devices and of electrical measurements. Must be accom- 
panied or preceded by Electrical Engineering 400. 

M WF8:oo 

Electrical Engineering 420. Electric and Magnetic 
Fields and Electrical Machine Design. Fundamental dis- 
cussion of electrostatic, magnetic, current, and thermal 
fields, and of Laplace's equation. Engineering methods of 
plotting fields. Application of basic field analysis to the 

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design of fundamental types of electrical machines. Must 
be accompanied or preceded by Electrical Engineering 400. 

T Th S 9 :oo T 2 :oo-6 :oo 

Electrical Engineering 430. Theoretical Electrical 
Engineering. A more complete mathematical treatment of 
alternating current phenomena than is given in Electrical 
Engineering 400. Open only to students registered in Elec- 
trical Engineering 400 and 410 who show capacity in mathe- 
matics and electrical theory. Three lectures and one four- 
hour laboratory period per week. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Electrical Engineering 440. Electrical Communica- 
tion. The principles of communication by telegraph and 
telephone over wires, and by radio. Open only to students 
registered in both Electrical Engineering 400 and 410 who 
show aptitude for communication work. 

T Th S 8:00 M 2:00-6:00 

Electrical Engineering 450. Advanced Electrical En- 
gineering Laboratory. Direct and alternating current ma- 
chinery, electronic devices, and electrical measurements. 
A laboratory study of the principles considered in Elec- 
trical Engineering 410. Prerequisite: Registration in Elec- 
trical Engineering 410. W Th 2:00-6:00 

Electrical Engineering 490. Electrical Engineering 
Problems. If conditions are favorable, students of electri- 
cal engineering may elect at least nine hours a week in 
approved investigations, usually experimental, under the 
direction of a member of the staff. Hours to be arranged. 

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Electrical Engineering 500. Advanced Circuit An- 
alysis. This course includes a study of Heaviside's Opera- 
tional Calculus, machine and circuit transients, non-linear 
circuits, symmetrical components, three and four winding 
transformer theory, transmission networks in steady state, 
and transient stability. Three lectures and one four-hour 
laboratory period per week. Hours to be arranged. 

Electrical Engineering 510. Thesis. A thorough 
report on an engineering investigation selected and carried 
out by the individual student. It is expected that a great 
deal of time will be given to thesis work. The course is con- 
sidered the equivalent of a three-hour course. Two copies of 
the accepted report will be required for deposit in the Insti- 
tute library. 

Civil Engineering 300A. Strength of Materials. Theory 
of beams, columns, and shafts. Stresses and deformations 
due to tensile, compressive and shearing forces; distribu- 
tion of shears, bending moments, deflections, torsional 
stresses, and combined stresses. Laboratory physical tests 
of cast iron, steel, wood, cement, bricks, and concrete. First 
half-year. Prerequisites: Full Junior standing and Physics 
100, Mathematics 200 or 210, and Engineering 230B. Lab- 
oratory fortnightly. 

T Th S 8:00 M 2:00-5:00 or S 10:00-1 :oo 

Civil Engineering 300B. Hydraulics. Principles of hy- 
drostatics and hydrodynamics; the flow of water through 
orifices, pipes, nozzles, in open channels, and over weirs. 
Laboratory tests of weirs, Venturi meters, and simple 
hydraulic machinery. Second half-year. Prerequisites and 

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recitation and laboratory hours are the same as for Civil 
Engineering 300A. 

Civil Engineering 320A. Advanced Surveying. Theory 
and practice of base line and triangulation measurements; 
determination of meridian, stadia, and plane table. Topog- 
raphy. Simple, compound, reversed, and spiral easement 
curves for railway and highway use. Mass diagrams and 
earthwork. First half-year. Prerequisites: Full Junior 
standing and Engineering 230A. 

T Th S 9:00 T Th 10:00-1 :oo 

Civil Engineering 320B. Graphic Statics and Stresses 
in Framed Structures. Algebraic and graphic statics applied 
to beams and trusses. Fixed and moving loads. Load sys- 
tems. Influence diagrams. Portals, transverse bents, and 
determination of maximum and minimum stresses in roof 
and bridge trusses. Second half-year, following Civil Engi- 
neering 320A. Prerequisites: Full Junior standing and En- 
gineering 230B and Civil Engineering 300A. Recitation and 
laboratory hours are the same as for Civil Engineering 320A. 

Civil Engineering 330. Strength of Materials. For 
chemical engineering students only. Theory of beams, col- 
umns, and shafts. Stresses and deformations due to tensile, 
compressive, and shearing stresses; distribution of shears, 
bending moments, deflections, torsion. Laboratory physical 
tests of steel, cast iron, wood, cement, and concrete. Second 
half-year. Prerequisites: Full Junior standing and Physics 
100, Engineering no, Mathematics 200, and Mathematics 
220A or 230A. Laboratory fortnightly. 

T Th S 9 :oo T 2 :oo-5 :oo (Seniors) 
T Th 10:00-1:00 (Juniors) 

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Civil Engineering 420. Municipal Engineering. The 
course covers three subjects. Highways: design, construc- 
tion and maintenance of earth, sand-clay, macadam, bi- 
tuminous macadam, asphaltic concrete, brick, wood-block, 
stone-block, and cement concrete roads. Legislation and 
methods of financing. Water Supply: a study of rainfall, 
evaporation, yield, water-bearing strata, etc. Water analy- 
sis and stream pollution. Design, construction, operation, 
and maintenance of purification systems, storage facilities, 
and distribution systems. Sewerage : a study of storm flow, 
modern methods of sanitation, disease epidemics, etc. 
Water carriage systems, separate and combined. Design, 
construction, and maintenance of sewers and sewage dis- 
posal plants. Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 300A and b. 

M W F 12:00 Th 2:00-5:00 

Civil Engineering 440. Masonry Construction. A 
study of concrete and concrete aggregates. Theory and de- 
sign of reinforced concrete slabs, beams, and columns. A 
study of foundations. Theory, investigation, and design of 
retaining walls, dams, and arches. Design of typical parts 
of buildings and beam and girder bridges. Prerequisites: 
Civil Engineering 300A and b. 

M W F 8:00 F 9:00-12:00 

Civil Engineering 460. Structural Design. Design of 
tension, and compression member and of riveted and welded 
connections. Design of roof trusses, simple bridge trusses, 
plate girders, and tall office frames. Detailed drawings and 
estimates of cost and weight. Deflection diagrams for 
trusses. Three lectures and two three-hour laboratory 

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periods per week throughout the year. Prerequisites: Civil 
Engineering 300A and b and 320B. 

T Th S 8 :oo M W 9:00-12:00 

Civil Engineering 490. Civil Engineering Problems. 
Under certain favorable conditions civil engineering stu- 
dents may elect an approved investigation of some civil en- 
gineering problem under the direction of a member of the 
civil engineering staff. (Not offered 1938-39.) 

Civil Engineering 500. Structural Design. Design of 
steel office and mill buildings. Analysis of stresses in stati- 
cally indeterminate structures such as swing, cantilever, 
arch, and suspension bridges. A study of secondary stresses. 
Two lectures and one design period a week. Prerequisite: 
Civil Engineering 450 or its equivalent. 

Civil Engineering 510. Hydraulic and Sanitary Engi- 
neering. Investigation and development of water power. 
Design of dams and irrigating systems. Hydraulic turbines 
and pumps. Preliminary design for a water supply and 
sewerage system for a small city. Study of general sanitary 
problems such as garbage disposal, public health, street 
cleaning. Three lectures and one design period a week. Pre- 
requisite : Civil Engineering 420 or its equivalent. 

Civil Engineering 520. Railway Engineering. A study 
of the principles of economic location and construction, 
railway maintenance, railway structures. Design of termi- 
nals and signalling systems. Railway organization and val- 
uation. Three lectures and one design period a week. Pre- 
requisite: Civil Engineering 320A or its equivalent. 

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Civil Engineering 530. Thesis. This will consist of 
an original investigation along some approved line of civil 
engineering work, an original design, or a critical review of 
existing work. In every case two complete typewritten or 
printed reports will be required for deposit in the Institute 
library. 

Chemical Engineering 305. First half-year : Stoichiom- 
etry, Fuels and Combustion, and Chemical Engineering 
Mathematics. Two lectures weekly and three hours of 
laboratory work fortnightly. The laboratory work consists 
of volumetric gas analysis and gas measurement. Second 
half-year: Flow of Fluids and Heat Transmission. Two 
lectures weekly and three hours of laboratory work fort- 
nightly. The laboratory work consists of experiments in 
fluid flow and heat transmission. Prerequisites: Full Junior 
standing and Chemistry 220. Taken with Chemical En- 
gineering 315. 

T S 9:00 first half-year; M F 10:00 second half-year 
Laboratory fortnightly T or W 2 :oo~5 :oo 

Chemical Engineering 315. Industrial Geology. One 
lecture weekly and three hours of laboratory work fort- 
nightly. The lectures consist of (1) a brief survey of his- 
torical geology to explain the origin of formations on the 
earth, (2) a detailed examination of the economic rocks, 
minerals, and other natural resources, and (3) a compre- 
hensive study of the surface features of the earth, with em- 
phasis on the forces and agents which have produced and 
are producing these results. The laboratory work consists 
of the qualitative analyses of minerals and rocks together 

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with their identification and classification. Prerequisites: 
Full Junior standing and Chemistry 220. Taken with 
Chemical Engineering 305. 

Th 9:00 first half-year; W 10:00 second half-year 
Laboratory fortnightly T or W 2 :oo-5 :oo 

Chemical Engineering 405. Unit Operations. Three 
lectures and six hours of laboratory work weekly. This 
course deals with the principles upon which the mechanical 
operations involved in the chemical manufacturing indus- 
tries depend, and with the types of equipment available for 
such operations and the kind of work for which each is 
best adapted. The application of the principles is illustrated 
both by discussion in the class room and by the solution of 
typical problems. Among the subjects considered are: 
evaporation; humidification and dehumidification ; air con- 
ditioning; drying; distillation and fractionation; filtration; 
absorption; extraction; crystallization; crushing; grinding; 
separation; agitation; transportation of solids, liquids, and 
gases; water softening; corrosion and water treatment for 
boiler use; pyrometry, etc. The laboratory work involves 
experiments in commercial analysis, in instrument calibra- 
tion, and in semiplant operations covering the basic prin- 
ciples underlying the above-mentioned unit operations of 
chemical industry. Prerequisites: Chemical Engineering 
305 and 315. M W F 8:00 Laboratory M F 2:00-5:00 

Chemical Engineering 415. Plant Design. Three lec- 
tures and one afternoon of conference or industrial inspec- 
tion weekly during the second half-year. This course in- 
volves: (1) the application of the principles of unit processes 

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and operations to the design of special chemical engineering 
equipment to be used in the manufacture of a selected 
product; (2) plant lay-out, development, and economics; 
and (3) organization for carrying out the process. 

The plant inspections include: (1) a critical examination, 
in conference, of processes, equipment, and problems of 
each industrial plant to be visited; (2) the inspection of the 
plant supplemented by discussions by plant officials; (3) a 
comprehensive report, by squads, consisting of flow-sheets, 
individual unit descriptions, and general specifications of 
interest. Types of industries inspected are: sewage, sugar, 
petroleum refining, cement, brewing and malting, steel 
pouring, plastics, heavy chemicals, fertilizers, etc. Pre- 
requisite: Chemical Engineering 405 or taking 405. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Chemical Engineering 425. Industrial Chemistry. 
Three hours of lectures weekly during the first half-year. 
This course consists of the application of chemical principles 
to selected modern industrial and engineering processes. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 310. 

T Th S 10:00 (first half-year) 

Chemical Engineering 435. Thermodynamics. Three 
hours of lectures weekly during the second half-year. A 
course in chemical thermodynamics, both theoretical and 
applied. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310. 

T Th S 10:00 (second half-year) 

Chemical Engineering 475. Experimental Problem and 
Thesis. Chemical Engineers in their fifth year^will be re- 

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quired to devote at least nine hours per week to an experi- 
mental problem and to prepare a thesis. 

Chemical Engineering 505. Advanced Unit Operations 
and Plant Design. Three lectures and six hours of labora- 
tory work weekly. The course consists of a detailed exami- 
nation of the basic laws of chemical engineering practice for 
the design and operation of plant equipment. In the labo- 
ratory, experiments are conducted in the design and opera- 
tion of industrial apparatus. Prerequisite : Chemical Engi- 
neering 405. Hours to be arranged. 

COURSES IN ARCHITECTURE 

To students of architecture the Institute offers a course ex- 
tending over five years, leading to a bachelor's degree at the 
end of the fourth year and to an architectural degree at the 
end of the fifth year. It is the purpose of the course to lead 
students during their residence to an understanding of the 
art of modern building. It seeks to acquaint them with the 
history of architecture from early civilization to the present 
age, and to develop within them an appreciation of those 
conceptions of beauty and utility which are fundamental 
in the art of design. 

In arranging the courses which follow it will be observed 
that there are included certain indispensable elements of 
a liberal education as well as such technical subjects as 
are becoming more necessary to the general education of 
a practising architect. Of the more strictly architectural 
subjects, design is given the largest place. The courses in 
history and design and those in freehand drawing, in water 
color, in drawing from life, and in historic ornament, have 

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all a double object: to create in the student an appreciation 
of architectural refinement and to increase more and more 
his ability to express architectural form. With a view to 
keeping the student in touch with the progress of his pro- 
fession and with the daily routine of its practice, it is 
strongly recommended that he spend his summer vacations 
in the office of a practising architect, or in work upon 
buildings in process of construction. 

The following are the schedules for the five years' course 
leading to a bachelor's degree in four years and a degree in 
architecture in five years: 

First Year 
(i) Mathematics ioo 

(2) English 100 

(3) French or Spanish 

(4) Chemistry 100 

(5) Architecture 100: consisting of 

(a) Elements of Architecture 

(b) Freehand Drawing 

Second Year 

(1) Pure Mathematics 

(2) English 

(3) French or Spanish 1 

(4) A science 

(5) Architecture 200: consisting of 

(a) Design 

(b) Freehand 

(c) History of Architecture 

1 Students in second year shall continue the language chosen in first 
year course. 

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Third Year 

(i) English 

(2) Architecture 300: Design 

(3) Architecture 310: consisting of 

(a) Freehand Drawing 

(b) Water-Color 

(c) History of Architecture 

(4) Architecture 330: Construction 

Fourth Year 

(1) English or History 

(2) Architecture 400: Design 

(3) Architecture 410: consisting of 

(a) History of Architecture 
(6) Freehand 

(4) Architecture 430: Construction 

(5) Architecture 440: consisting of 

(a) Historic Ornament 

(b) Water-Color 

Fifth Year 

(1) Architecture 500: Thesis Design 

(2) Architecture 520: Life Drawing and Water-Color 

(3) Architecture 530: Construction 

(4) Architecture 510 or 540: History 

To students interested in art and architecture, but not 
seeking a professional degree in architecture, the following 
four-year sequence of courses leading to a bachelor's degree 
is recommended : 

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First year: Mathematics ioo, English ioo, French ioo, 
Physics ioo, and Architecture ioo. 

Second year: History ioo, English 200, French 200, a 
science, and Architecture 200. 

Third year: English, Philosophy 300, Architecture 310, 
a science, and one other subject. 

Fourth year: English, History 330, Architecture 440, 
and Architecture 540. 

Architecture ioo. 

(a) Elements of Architecture. Elementary training in 
drawing and composition, with a series of lectures on de- 
scriptive geometry, shades and shadows, and perspective. 
Two lecture and six laboratory hours. M Th 1 :30-5 130 

(b) Freehand Drawing. Elementary drawing in pencil 
and charcoal of simple objects and block groups and casts. 
Four hours a week. W F 1 1 :oo-i :oo 

Architecture 200. 

(a) Design. Problems embracing the design of elements 
of buildings, together with problems of small buildings. Six 
hours a week. T Th 2 130-5 130 

(b) Freehand Drawing and Modeling. Drawing in char- 
coal from simple casts. Modeling in clay. Six hours a week. 

MWF11 :oo-i :oo 

(c) History of Architecture. Two lectures a week on the 
history of ancient architecture, illustrated by lantern slides, 
and three hours a week of research and tracing of historic 
buildings. Five hours a week. W F 1 :30-4 :oo 

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Architecture 300. 

Design. The design of buildings of moderate requirements 
and dimensions. The problems average five weeks in dura- 
tion with twenty-four hours for the sketch problems at the 
end of major problems. Nine hours a week. M W F 2 :30-5 130 

Architecture 310. 

(a) Freehand Drawing. Drawing from casts of antique 
sculpture. Four hours a week. M F 10:00-12:00 

(b) Water-Color. Elementary training in color drawing 
and simple groups of still life. Two hours a week. 

W 8:00-10:00 

(c) History of Architecture. Two lectures a week in 
the history of mediaeval architecture, illustrated by lantern 
slides, and three hours a week of research in the study of 
historic buildings. Five hours a week. T Th 1 :30~4 :oo 

Architecture 330. 

Construction. The mechanics of materials and graphic 
statics in relation to architectural practice. Three lectures 
a week. M W F 1 2 :oo 

Architecture 400. 

Design. The design of public buildings and groups of 
buildings. The problems average six weeks in duration, 
alternating with twelve-hour sketch problems. Twelve 
hours a week. T 1 30-5 :30 M W Th F 3 30-5 :30 

Architecture 410. 

(a) History of Architecture. Two lectures a week on 
the history of modern architecture and three hours a week 
library research. W F 11:00-12:00 

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(b) Freehand. Drawing from casts of full figure and 
group antique sculpture. Four hours a week. 

T Th 9:00-11 :oo 
Architecture 430. 

Methods of Construction. Three lectures a week on 
materials, construction, and specification writing. 

M W F 1 30-2 30 
Architecture 440. 

(a) Historic Ornament. The study of the history of 
ornament, with a series of design plates in ornament from 
historic periods of architecture. Four hours a week. 

M F 10:00-12:00 

(b) Water-Color. Water-color drawing and sketching in 
color, work advanced, subjects varied. Two hours a week. 

W 9 :oo-i 1 :oo 
Architecture 500. 

Thesis Design. The problem of a thesis may consist of 
a single building or group of buildings, and must include 
large-scale studies as well as general drawings. The stu- 
dent may select his own problem, but his entire programme 
is subject to the approval of the professor in design. Twenty 
hours a week. M W F 8:00-12:00 T Th 1:30-5:30 

Architecture 510. 

History of Painting and Sculpture. Three lectures a 
week on history of painting and sculpture. A critical sur- 
vey of historic schools of painting and sculpture. Open to 
Juniors and Seniors taking the academic course. (Alternates 
with Architecture 540.) (Not offered 1938-39) 

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Architecture 520. 

Life Drawing and Water-Color. Rendered architectural 
details and measured drawings in color. Five hours. 

T 9 :oo-i 1 :oo S 8 :oo-i 1 :oo 
Architecture 530. 

Construction. Three lectures a week on design of rein- 
forced concrete structure and on estimating of building 
costs, including the business relations of architect with 
client and contractor. M W F 1 130 

Architecture 540. 

A History of Painting and Sculpture of the Italian Ren- 
aissance. A critical survey of the art of the Renaissance, 
its origins and subsequent development from the beginning 
of the thirteenth until the close of the seventeenth centuries, 
with particular emphasis upon the period between the 
years 1400 and 1592. Open to Juniors and Seniors taking 
the academic course. T Th S 11:00 

Architecture 600. 

A course for students who have received the Bachelor of 
Science degree in Architecture. Research with weekly 
seminars upon a thesis chosen with the approval of a mem- 
ber of the Faculty. 

UNIVERSITY EXTENSION LECTURES 

To bring the people of the city and community into more 
intimate touch with the academic life of the university, and 
to carry the influence of that life directly to many homes 
not represented on the rolls of its undergraduate or post- 

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graduate students, regular series of public lectures, in the 
form of university extension lectures, are offered without 
matriculation fee or other form of admission requirement. 
These performances are authoritative in character, non- 
technical and popular in treatment, and on subjects of 
current interest as well as of assured and permanent value, 
from various domains of literature, history, science, art, 
philosophy, and politics. 

PUBLIC LECTURESHIPS 

Three public lectureships have been founded at the Rice 
Institute. The first of these, established in 1918 by Mrs. 
Estelle B. Sharp, of Houston, has to do primarily with 
topics in the social sciences; the second, founded in 1919 
by Herbert Godwin, Esq., of Houston, is to be devoted 
initially to subjects of public concern during the period of 
reconstruction; while the third, founded anonymously in 
1922 by a citizen of Houston, is dedicated to the promotion 
of interest in music both in the university and in the com- 
munity. The Sharp Lectureship was inaugurated in the 
autumn of 191 8 by a course of lectures on "The Obliga- 
tions and Privileges of Citizenship — a plea for the study 
of social science," by the late Sir Henry Jones, F.B.A., 
professor in the University of Glasgow. Subsequent lec- 
tures on the Sharp Foundation have been delivered by 
Professor Andrew C. McLaughlin, of the University of 
Chicago, by Dr. T. R. Glover, of Cambridge University, 
and by Sir Robert Falconer, of the University of Toronto. 
The Godwin Lectureship was inaugurated in the spring of 
1920 by lectures on "The Conservation of the Institutions 

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of the Republic," and "World-wide Cooperation among 
the Nations," by the Hon. William Howard Taft, twenty- 
seventh President of the United States of America. Further 
lectures on the Godwin Foundation have been delivered 
by Sir Auckland Geddes, British Ambassador to the United 
States, and by President A. Lawrence Lowell, of Harvard 
University. The Lectureship in Music was inaugurated in 
the spring of 1923 by a course of lectures on music in the 
life of the community and of the nation, delivered by Mr. 
John Powell, the American composer and pianist; the 
Lectureship in Music has also been held by Mile. Nadia 
Boulanger, of Paris, by Sir Henry Hadow, Vice-Chancellor 
of the University of Sheffield, by MM. Maurice Ravel and 
A. Honegger, of Paris, by Professor George D. Birkhoff, of 
Harvard University, and by Mr. Harold Morris. 

THE RICE INSTITUTE PUBLICATIONS 

Among the publications of the Rice Institute are at present 
included the Announcements, the Descriptive Brochure, 
the Programmes of University Extension Lectures, and 
the Rice Institute Pamphlet. The first three of these have 
appeared at intervals and in several editions; the Pamphlet, 
now in its twenty-third volume, is published quarterly in 
January, April, July, and October, with a view to giving 
wider publicity in permanent form to inaugural and other 
lectures in letters, science, and art by resident and visiting 
lecturers and professors of the university. In this connec- 
tion the reader may wish to turn to an earlier paragraph 
on the formal opening of the Institute. 

[131] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

LIBRARY 

Temporary quarters for the library of the Institute have 
been provided in the administration building. The affairs 
of the library are administered through a committee of 
the Faculty, and Miss Alice C. Dean, M.A., is Acting Li- 
brarian. In providing the initial equipment of the library 
the policy is being followed of supplying such books as are 
necessary to supplement the courses of instruction and to 
support the independent investigations of members of the 
Faculty and advanced students. For works of general and 
more popular interest the shelves of the Houston Public 
Library are accessible to all members of the Institute. 

Besides several hundred current literary and scientific 
journals, the library of the Institute contains at present 
about forty-five thousand volumes in back files of serial pub- 
lications; among these are sets of the following: Abstracts 
of Bacteriology, L'Academie des Sciences de Paris Comptes 
Rendus, Acta Mathematica, Allgemeine Deutsche Biog- 
raphie, American Academy of Political Science Annals, 
American Anthropological Association Memoirs, American 
Anthropologist (New Series), American Antiquarian Society 
Proceedings and Transactions, American Economic Associ- 
ation Publications, American Economic Review, American 
Chemical Society Journal, American Electric Railway 
Engineering Association Proceedings, American Electro- 
Chemical Society Transactions, American Historical Asso- 
ciation Annual Reports, American Historical Review, 
American Institute of Chemical Engineers Transactions, 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers Transactions, 
American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Transactions, American Journal of Education, American 
Journal of International Law, American Journal of Mathe- 
matics, American Journal of Microscopy and Popular 
Science, American Journal of Philology, American Jour- 
nal of Psychology, American Journal of Science, Ameri- 
can Journal of Tropical Medicine, American Machinist, 
American Mathematical Monthly, Americal Mathematical 
Society Transactions and Bulletin, American Naturalist, 
American Political Science Review, American Quarterly 
Review, American Review of Reviews, American Society for 
Testing Materials Proceedings, American Society of Civil 
Engineers Transactions, American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers Transactions, American State Papers, Analyst, 
Anatomical Record, Anglia, Annali di Matematica, Annalen 
der Chemie, Annalen der Physik, Annales de Chimie et de 
Physique, Annals of Mathematics, Annee Biologique, 
Annee Philosophique, Annee Psychologique, Annual of 
Scientific Discovery, Annual Register, Antologia, Archi- 
tectural Record, Archiv des Criminalrechts, Archiv fur 
Entwickelungsmechanik der Organismen, Archiv fur Ge- 
schichte der Philosophic, Archiv fur Mikroskopische 
Anatomie und Entwicklungsmechanik, Archiv fur Protis- 
tenkunde, Archiv fur Zellforschung, Archives Neerlandaises 
des Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Archives of Pathology 
and Laboratory Medicine, Arkiv for Matematik, Astronomi 
och Fysik, Aristotelian Society Proceedings, Arts and Deco- 
ration, Astrophysical Journal, Atlantic Monthly, Bangor 
Historical Magazine, Baptist Quarterly, Bee, Behavior 
Monographs, Beitrage zur Geophysik, Beitrage zur Ge- 
schichte der Deutschen Sprache und Literatur, Bell Tele- 
phone System Technical Publications, Bentley's Miscellany, 

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THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Berichte iiber die Wissenschaftliche Biologie, Bibelot, Bib- 
liographical Society (London) Transactions, Bibliotheca 
Belgica, Bibliotheca Mathematica (Neue Folge), Bio- 
chemische Zeitschrift, Biologica, Biological Bulletin, Bi- 
ologisches Zentralblatt, Bird-lore, Blackwood's Edinburgh 
Magazine, Bookman, Le Botaniste, British Academy Pro- 
ceedings, British Association for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence Reports, British Journal of Psychology, British 
Quarterly Review, Bulletin of Entomological Research, 
California University Publications in History, California 
University Publications in Zoology, Camden Society Pub- 
lications, Carnegie Institution of Washington Publications, 
Central-blatt fur Bakteriologie, Chemical Abstracts, Chem- 
ical Engineer, Chemical News, Chemisches Zentralblatt, 
Church Quarterly Review, Circolo Matematico di Palermo 
Rendiconti, Civilta. Cattolica, Classical Philology, Classical 
Review, Comparative Psychology Monographs, Contem- 
porary Review, Copeia, Corpus Juris, La Critica, Current 
History Magazine, Deutsche Chemische Gesellschaft Be- 
richte, Deutsche Nationalbibliographie, Deutsche Rund- 
schau, Early English Text Society Publications, L'Ecole 
Normale Superieure Annales Scientifiques, L'Eclairage 
Electrique, Ecology, Economic Journal, Edinburgh Mathe- 
matical Society Proceedings, Edinburgh Review, Educa- 
tional Administration and Supervision, Educational Re- 
search Bulletin, Educational Review, Electric Journal, 
Electrical World, Elektrotechnische Zeitschrift, Electri- 
cian, Engineering Index Annual, Engineering News-Record, 
L'Enseignement Mathematique, Englische Studien, English 
Historical Review, Entomological News, Entomologists' 
Monthly Magazine, Ethnological Society of London Trans- 

[134] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

actions (New Series), Ergebnisse der Anatomie und 
Entwickelungsgeschichte, Eugenics Review, Experiment 
Station Record, Filosofia delle Scuole Italiane, Folk-lore 
Society (London) Publications, Fortschritte der Mathema- 
tik, Forum, Gazzetta Chimica Italiana, Genetic Psy- 
chology Monographs, Genetics, Gentlemen's Magazine, 
Gesellschaft fur Altere Deutsche Geschichtkunde Neues 
Archiv, Giornali di Matematiche di Battaglini, Great 
Britain Royal Commission Historical Manuscripts, Green 
Bag, Harper's Monthly Magazine, Harvard Graduates' 
Magazine, Harvard Law Review, Harvard Studies and 
Notes in Philology and Literature, Harvard Studies in 
Classical Philology, Harvard Theological Review, Hibbert 
Journal, India Medical Department Scientific Memoirs, 
Indian Journal of Medical Research, Industrial Manage- 
ment, Institution of Electrical Engineers Journal, Inter- 
national Catalog of Scientific Literature, International 
Journal of Ethics, International Monthly Magazine of 
Literature, Science and Art, International Studio, Jahr- 
buch der Radioaktivitat und Elektronik, Jefferson Physical 
Laboratory Contributions, Journal de Chimie Physique, 
Journal de Mathematiques, Journal de Physique, Journal 
fur Praktische Chemie, Journal of Animal Behavior, 
Journal of Bacteriology, Journal of Comparative Psychol- 
ogy. Journal of Economic Entomology, Journal of English 
and Germanic Philology, Journal of Experimental Biology, 
Journal of Experimental Medicine, Journal of Physiology, 
Journal of Experimental Psychology, Journal of Experi- 
mental Zoology, Journal of General Psychology, Journal of 
Hellenic Studies, Journal of Helminthology, Journal of Hy- 
giene, Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 

[135] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Journal of Immunology, Journal of Infectious Diseases, Jour- 
nal of Medical Research, Journal of Morphology, Journal of 
Nutrition, Journal of Parasitology, Journal of Philology, 
Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods, 
Journal of Physical Chemistry, Journal of Roman Studies, 
Journal of Science, Journal of Speculative Philosophy, 
Journal of the Society of Chemical Engineers, Journal of 
Theological Studies, K. Akademie van Wetenschappen te 
Amsterdam Proceedings, Kansas University Geological 
Survey Contributions to the Paleontology of Kansas, Kan- 
sas University Humanistic Studies and Science Bulletin 
Kolloidchemische Beihefte, Kolloid-zeitschrift, Larousse 
Mensuel, Das Literarische Echo, Literary and Theological 
Review, London Mathematical Society Proceedings, La 
Lumiere Electrique, Massachusetts Historical Society Pro- 
ceedings, Mathematische Annalen, Mathematische Zeit- 
schrift, Mathesis, Merchants' Magazine and Commercial 
Review, Messenger of Mathematics, Metallurgical and 
Chemical Engineering, Mikrochemie, Mind, Mississippi 
Historical Society Publications, Mississippi Valley His- 
torical Association Proceedings and Review, Modern 
Language Association of America Publications, Modern 
Language Review, Modern Philology, Monatschefte fur 
Mathematik und Physik, Monist, Monthly Anthology 
and Boston Review, Monumenta Germaniae Historica, 
Municipal Affairs, Nation, Museum of Foreign Litera- 
ture, Science and Art, National Electric Light Associa- 
tion Bulletin (New Series), National Municipal Review, 
National Society for the Study of Education Yearbooks, 
Natural History, Nature, Die Naturwissenschaften, Neo- 
philologus, Neudrucke Deutscher Literaturwerke, New 

[136] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

England Magazine, New Republic, New Shakspere Society 
Publications, New York Review, New York Times Index, 
Niederlandisches Archiv fur Zoologie, Niles' Weekly Regis- 
ter, Nineteenth Century, Notes and Queries, Nouvelles 
annales de Mathematiques, Novitates Zoologicae, Oregon 
Historical Quarterly, Palaestra, Parasitology, Pedagogical 
Seminary, Percy Society Publications, Philosophical Maga- 
zine and Journal of Science, Philosophical Review, Philos- 
ophic Positive, Philosophische Monatshefte, Physical 
Review, Physical Society of London Proceedings, Physio- 
logical Abstracts, Physikalische Zeitschrift, Political Science 
Quarterly, Print Collectors' Quarterly, Progressive Edu- 
cation, Psychological Abstracts, Psychological Bulletin, 
Psychological Index, Psychologische Forschung, Public 
Opinion (Washington), Punch, Quarterly Journal of Micro- 
scopical Science, Quarterly Journal of Pure and Applied 
Mathematics, Quarterly Review, R. Accademia dei Lincei 
Rendiconti, R. Accademia delle Scienze Fisiche e Mate- 
matiche (Naples) Atti, R. Accademia di Scienze Morali e 
Politiche (Naples) Atti, R. Accademia di Scienze, Lettere 
ed Arti (Padua) Atti (Nuova Seri), R. Accademia Lucchese 
di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti Atti, R. Scuola Normale Su- 
periore (Pisa) Annali, Raccolta d'Opuscoli Scientifici e 
Filologici, Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas, 
Review of Applied Entomology, Series B, Review of Bac- 
teriology, Protozoology and General Parasitology, Revue 
de Mathematiques Speciales, Revue de Paris, Revue de 
Philosophic, Revue de Synthese Historique, Revue des Deux 
Mondes, Revue Generale de l'Electricite, Revue Historique, 
Revue Moderne, Revue Musicale, Revue Philosophique 
de la France et de l'Etranger, Revue Politique et Parlemen- 

[ 137] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

taire, Revue Semestrielle des Publications Mathematiques, 
Rivista di Filosofia e Scienze Affini, Romanic Review, Royal 
Historical Society Transactions, Royal Microscopical Soci- 
ety Journal, Royal Society of London Philosophical Trans- 
actions and Proceedings, Royal Society of Medicine Pro- 
ceedings, Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 
School and Society, School Review, Science, Science 
Abstracts, Scientific Monthly, Scottish Text Society Pub- 
lications, Select Journal of Foreign Periodical Literature, 
Sleeping Sickness Bureau (London) Bulletin, Smith College 
Studies in History, Social Hygiene, Societa Entomologica 
Italiana Memorie, Societe Chimique de France Bulletin, 
Societe de Biologie Comptes Rendus, Societe de Patho- 
logie Exotique (West Africa) Bulletin, Societe Mathe- 
matique de France Bulletin, Society for the Promotion 
of Engineering Education Proceedings, Society of Chemi- 
cal Industry Journal, Southwestern Historical Quarterly, 
Southwestern Political and Social Science Quarterly, 
Southwestern Reporter, Strand Magazine, Studien zur 
vergleichenden Literaturgeschichte, Studio, Texas Law 
Review, Texas Supreme Court Reports, The Times Weekly 
(London), Tropical Diseases Bulletin, Tropical Veterinary 
Bulletin, United States Daily, United States National Ad- 
visory Committee for Aeronautics Annual Reports, United 
States Supreme Court Reports, Unpopular Review, Viertel- 
jahrsschrift fur Wissenschaftliche Philosophic und Sozio- 
logie, Washington Academy of Sciences Proceedings, Wil- 
helm Roux' Archiv fur Entwicklungsmechanik der Organis- 
men, World's Work, Yale Review (New Series), Yellow 
Book, Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung fur Rechtsgeschichte, 
Zeitschrift fiir Analytische Chemie, Zeitschrift fur Ange- 

[138] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

wandte Chemie, Zeitschrift fur Anorganische Chemie, 
Zeitschrift fur Elektrochemie, Zeitschrift fur Exacte 
Philosophic, Zeitschrift fiir Geophysik, Zeitschrift fur 
Geschichtliche Rechtswissenschaft, Zeitschrift fiir Instru- 
mentenkunde, Zeitschrift fiir Mathematik und Physik, 
Zeitschrift fiir Physikalische Chemie, Zeitschrift fiir Psy- 
chologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane, Zeitschrift fiir 
Wissenschaftliche Insektenbiologie, Zeitschrift fiir Wissen- 
schaftliche Photographie, Zoologica, Zoological Record, 
Zoological Society of London Proceedings, Zoologischer 
Anzeiger, Zoologischer Jahresbericht. 

LABORATORY INSTALLATION 

The physics laboratories are located on the north side of 
the academic court, adjoining the administration building, 
and are connected with the latter by a continuation of the 
original cloister. The buildings are constructed of brick 
and marble, corresponding in design to the style as defined 
in the administration building, but of a simpler character 
expressing their purpose as laboratories. The physics labo- 
ratory proper is a two-story building 275X56 feet, con- 
nected with a large lecture amphitheater 121 X72 feet. The 
main building contains four large students' laboratories, 
two lecture rooms equipped for giving illustrated lectures, 
and four research rooms, two dark rooms, a library reading 
room, and administrative offices. The principal room of 
the amphitheater wing is a large lecture hall with seating 
capacity for about four hundred auditors. The room is 
fully equipped for giving illustrated lectures and is arranged 
with seats properly elevated to command a 28-foot lecture 

[ 139] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

table which is supplied with gas, hot and cold water, com- 
pressed air, vacuum, and direct and alternating electric 
currents. In this wing also are six rooms fitted for research 
work in physics, a battery room in which a battery of ioo 
Edison storage cells of 300 ampere-hours' capacity has been 
installed with space provided for another equal battery, 
a switchboard room where the wires from the battery can 
be connected in any desired manner for use in the labora- 
tories, motor generators for charging the batteries and 
supplying direct current to the lecture rooms and labora- 
tories, a vacuum pump, liquid air plant, constant tempera- 
ture rooms, a preparation room, a large dark room, a fully 
equipped workshop, and a students' workshop. The floor 
of the workshop is supported free from contact with the 
surrounding walls so that vibration from the machines does 
not affect the building. Elevators for moving heavy ap- 
paratus are provided, and all laboratories, lecture rooms, 
and research rooms are equipped with individual service 
for the students, of gas, water, steam, compressed air, 
vacuum, and both direct and alternating currents of elec- 
tricity. The laboratory now contains a fine collection of 
modern apparatus suitable for teaching and research work 
in all branches of physics. This collection includes about 
seventy ammeters and voltmeters of all types, including a 
Kelvin gauge reading up to 30,000 volts and standard 
Weston instruments. About fifty resistance boxes of all 
kinds are also provided, and numerous galvanometers, 
electrometers, and electroscopes of various types. High 
potential batteries and generators are available for research 
work. A large Weiss electromagnet, a large electromagnet 
with poles 20 cms. in diameter, a large Pye magnet, a 

[140] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

large cobalt steel permanent magnet, a Leeds and Northrup 
potentiometer, and complete equipment for the accurate 
measurement of the conductivity of solutions, a precision 
electric wave meter and precision air condenser may be 
specially mentioned among the other electrical instruments. 
The optical instruments include a Hilger's wave length 
spectrometer, monochromatic illuminator, spectrophotom- 
eter, and quartz spectrograph ; also a set of interferometers 
of various types. Several modern X-ray generators are 
available for research work. For work in heat, electrical 
furnaces, various types of radiation pyrometers, resistance 
thermometers, and standard thermocouples are available. 
The equipment includes a supply of radium, radiothorium, 
and polonium for work on radioactivity. For work on 
nuclear physics a 200,000 volt d. c. source is available and 
a 3,000,000 volt generator is being constructed. An Eotvos 
torsion balance machine of the most improved pattern for 
geophysical work has lately been installed. This machine, 
valued at $10,000, is the gift of Mr. Robert McM. Gillespie 
of New York City. The apparatus for general work includes 
rotary and diffusion pumps; also standards of weight, 
length, etc. The collection of apparatus for illustrating 
lectures is exceptionally complete. An instrument maker 
and a glass blower are employed in the construction of 
special apparatus for research work. The department 
library contains all important textbooks, works of ref- 
erence, and complete sets of journals. 

The laboratories for chemistry and chemical engineering 
are housed in a three-story building of maximum rec- 
tangular dimensions of 307 and 181 feet, with ample attic 
and basement accommodations, built around several open 

[141] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

courts, facing the south. Of brick and stone, steel and 
concrete construction, the building embodies the prevailing 
architectural beauty and simplicity of technical plan exhib- 
ited in the earlier science laboratories of Rice. Provision 
is made for adequately equipped, separate laboratories 
both for research and instruction in the half-dozen major 
branches of chemistry and chemical engineering, with an 
even larger number of smaller laboratories for corre- 
sponding work in the more highly specialized subjects of 
the science. In all the laboratories there is an abundance 
of natural light, while an elaborate system of artificial 
ventilation removes all fumes through a central draft 
tower, so designed as to constitute of itself one of the 
architectural features of the building. Careful consid- 
eration has been given both to the anticipated growth 
of the institution and the normal development of the 
department. The plans thus studiously prepared may bear 
comparison with those of extensive establishments erected 
recently at other universities and scientific centres of the 
country. The department is well equipped with modern 
apparatus and materials for research and for lecture room 
and laboratory work in inorganic, organic, analytical, 
physical, colloid, electro-, physiological, and industrial 
chemistry, and chemical engineering. Some of the more 
special apparatus includes a General Electric X-ray 
diffraction apparatus, a Seemann X-ray diffraction anal- 
ysis apparatus, a Seemann electron diffraction apparatus 
with high voltage supply consisting of a constant potential 
kenetron rectifying unit operated from a motor-generator, 
a Philips- Metal ix crystal analysis unit, an X-ray diffraction 
camera for colloidal solutions, recording photo densitom- 

[142] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

eter, Moll recording microphotometer, Mattson Cata- 
phoresis apparatus, Hilger X-ray spectrograph, Zeiss auto 
collimating spectrograph, Zeiss and Bausch and Lomb 
ultramicroscope outfits, Zeiss interferometer refractom- 
eter, Leitz micro- and macro-motion photographic out- 
fit, complete facilities for developing and projecting motion 
pictures, Reichert metallographic microscope, quadrant 
electrometer, Leeds and Northrup type K potentiometers, 
Youden capillary glass electrode hydrogen ion apparatus, 
Richard's high pressure compressibility apparatus, special 
research laboratory for atomic weight determinations, 
Sharpies super-centrifuges, porcelain basket type centrifuge, 
specially designed thermostats for precise solubility deter- 
minations over wide temperature ranges, Pregl micro- 
analytical outfits including several Kuhlman balances, 
basal metabolism apparatus, experimental double effect 
Swenson evaporator with vertical and horizontal effects, 
Buflovak standard vacuum shelf drier, Sperry plate and 
frame and Kelly filter presses, experimental humidification, 
dehumidification, and air conditioning apparatus, 9 plate 
experimental fractionating column, complete Sturtevant 
equipment for crushing and grinding including jaw, roll, and 
disc type crushers, etc. Each laboratory room is equipped 
with the necessary conveniences, such as water, gas, alter- 
nating and direct current, air blast, hoods, suction pumps, 
etc. The lecture rooms are suitably arranged for the illus- 
tration of lectures by experiment and lantern projection. 
In the department library will be found the more important 
journals, works of reference, and standard textbooks on the 
different branches of chemistry and chemical engineering. 
These books and periodicals are accessible to all students. 

[143] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

The department of biology is for the present situated in 
the west end of the main wing of the physics laboratories. 
It has laboratories capable of seating one hundred and fifty 
students; lecture rooms with lantern for microscopic and 
other forms of projection; research rooms, preparators' 
room, store rooms, etc. Undergraduate courses of cultural 
nature are offered for academic students, and more technical 
courses for premedical and physical education students. 
Laboratory work is available in almost all of the courses, 
and modern and fully equipped microscopes are provided. 
Facilities are available for advanced research work in such 
subjects as parasitology, bacteriology, entomology, physi- 
ology, genetics, and experimental embryology. The depart- 
ment is also equipped with an extensive series of specimens, 
casts, and charts for the study of zoology. Binocular micro- 
scopes, microtomes of various kinds, thermostats, embed- 
ding baths, and considerable accessory equipment, including 
physiological apparatus, are available for research work. 
Most of the important current zoological periodicals are to 
be found in the library. 

The psychological laboratory at present occupies six 
rooms on the first floor of the chemical laboratory adjoining 
the large lecture hall of that building. The equipment con- 
sists of the apparatus necessary for the laboratory exercises 
and demonstrations in an advanced course in human experi- 
mental psychology. A number of instruments suitable for 
research are available, and more apparatus is being added 
for research as needed. A large dark room is provided for 
experiments on vision. 

The department of architecture is located on the second 
floor of the chemistry laboratory, and is equipped with 

[ 144] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

large general drafting rooms modern in all their appoint- 
ments, and a large studio for freehand drawing and water- 
color. The library of architecture adjoins the drafting 
rooms and is equipped with the standard architectural publi- 
cations necessary for reference and research, current files of 
architectural periodicals, plates, photographs, and lantern 
slides. The freehand studio is well equipped with plaster 
casts from the antique and examples of historic ornament. 
The department also possesses models for elementary in- 
struction and models for the teaching of construction. 

The drafting rooms for instruction in engineering drawing 
are located in the mechanical laboratory building. These 
rooms are equipped with drawing tables, lockers, and racks 
in such number that all students may work independently. 
Special equipment includes blue printing machines, univer- 
sal drafting machines, parallel attachments, folding and roll- 
ing parallel rules, ellipsographs, beam compasses, section 
liners, and an elaborate set of Olivier models including the 
war mast, hyperbolic paraboloid, elliptical and conchoidal 
hyperboloid, conoid, groined, and cloistered arch, intersect- 
ing cylinders, raccording warped surface, and corne de 
vache. 

The civil engineering laboratory is fully equipped with 
the usual surveying instruments, transits, levels, compasses, 
traverse tables, and plane-tables, all of standard American 
makes. These include C. L. Berger and Sons, Buff and Buff, 
W. and L. E. Gurley, Bausch and Lomb, Keuffel and Esser, 
Eugene Dietzgen and Company, William Ainsworth and 
Sons, and the A. Lietz Company. There is also a large 
assortment of the necessary auxiliary equipment such as 
tapes, rods, range poles, etc. The drafting room is fully 

[145] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

equipped with instruments not required by each individual 
student, such as planimeters, protractors, special slide-rules, 
military sketching boards, railroad curves and irregular 
curves consisting of splines and weights, and calculating 
machines. The materials testing laboratory of this depart- 
ment is equipped with one 50,000 pound Riehle universal 
machine; one Olsen 15,000 pound universal machine; one 
100,000 pound Olsen universal machine; one 200,000 pound 
Olsen universal machine; and one 60,000 inch-pound Riehle 
torsion machine; a Riehle standard paving brick rattler; a 
Riehle two-gang Deval abrasion machine; a Bureau of 
Standards flow table; suitable equipment for tension tests 
of belting; also an Olsen-Boyd 1000 pound automatic bri- 
quette testing machine; a Tyler Ro-tap testing sieve shaker, 
and the necessary auxiliary apparatus for making the usual 
tests. All of these machines except the cement testing ma- 
chine are operated by directly connected individual motors 
so as to avoid all shafting and belting. The hydraulics 
laboratory is equipped with a Worthington 200 gallon per 
minute, 100 ft. head volute centrifugal pump with a direct 
connected slip ring motor; a simplex Venturi meter; trape- 
zoidal, triangular, and rectangular weirs; a Pelton-Doble 
impulse turbine; a Gould ram; storage reservoir; overhead 
calibrated tank; and necessary gauges and other usual equip- 
ment. It is planned to add from time to time such addi- 
tional equipment as is necessary for tests by advanced stu- 
dents and for research. 

The equipment of the electrical engineering laboratory is 
ample for a thorough study of direct and alternating current 
circuits and machines. All the common types are repre- 
sented and some of the less usual. In some of the types, 

[146] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

older machines may be compared with the more modern and 
the trend of development noted. There are examples of the 
practice of each of the leading manufacturers, including 
Crocker-Wheeler, Holtzer-Cabot, Roth, Sprague, Western 
Electric, General Electric, Westinghouse, Wagner, Robbins 
and Myers, Commercial, Electric Manufacturing Company, 
Fairbanks-Morse, Kuhlman Electric, Pittsburgh Trans- 
former, Roller-Smith, Condit, Cutter, Cutler-Hammer, 
Ward-Leonard, Jewell, Biddle, Leeds-Northrup, and Wes- 
ton. Among the direct current machines are generators 
rated: 50 kilowatts 250 volts; 35 kilowatts 250/125 volts 
(three wire) ; two alike, 5 kilowatts 125 volts, for parallel 
operation either flat- or over-compound; 5 kilowatts no 
volts; 4>£ kilowatts 125 volts fiat-compound; 3^ kilowatts 
125 volts flat-compound; 1 kilowatt 500 volts; 4 kilowatts 8 
volts (500 amperes) with Tirrill regular; i}4 kilowatts 
2000/1200/800 volts; a set of three direct-connected ma- 
chines for 90/150 and 20/25 volts direct current and 90/1 10 
volts three-phase 170/250 cycle alternating current; and 
motors rated: 25 horse-power 250 volts (compound); 5 
horse-power 500 volts (old type) ; two alike, 13 horse-power 
230 volts; 10 horse-power, 7^2 horse-power, 2 horse-power, 
all shunt wound for 230 volts; 3 horse-power 230 volts, vari- 
able speed ; 4 horse-power 220 volts, series. The alternating 
current equipment includes: a 60 horse-power 2300 volt syn- 
chronous motor, with push button starter, direct coupled to 
two 25 kilovolt-ampere 220 volt 3-phase alternators; two 
phase-displacement sets, one consisting of two identical "jyi 
kilovolt-ampere, 220 volt, 1-2-3-6-phase synchronous 
generators, with shifting stators, which may be direct con- 
nected or operated without mechanical connection, the other 

[147] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

similar, except that the generators are 15 kilovolt-ampere 
and one is mounted for use as a cradle dynamometer; a 5 
kilovolt-ampere 220 volt 3-phase synchronous generator 
with distributed field (round rotor) ; a 4 kilovolt-ampere 
3-phase no volt 200 cycle generator; a 7^ horse-power 
3-phase squirrel cage induction motor; a 5 horse-power 
3-phase slip ring induction motor with controller; another of 
the same rating with starter; a 10 horse-power induction 
motor with internal starting resistance; a 7^ horse-power 
Fynn-Weichsel 3-phase motor; a 7^2 horse-power unity 
power factor single-phase motor; a 3 horse-power 220 volt 
single-phase condenser type motor; a 50 horse-power induc- 
tion motor with internal starting resistance; a 50 kilovolt- 
ampere synchronous motor; three 2 kilovolt-ampere and six 
3 kilovolt-ampere 110/220:110/220 volt transformers; two 
3 kilovolt-ampere 460/230:230/115 volt 3-phase trans- 
formers of the shell type; six 5 kilovolt-ampere 1 10/220 volt 
transformers with taps for Scott and other connections; 
three 10 kilovolt-ampere 2300/440/220 volt transformers. 
Of particular interest are: a 15/35 horse-power oil field in- 
duction motor with control equipment; a 25 horse-power 
250 volt cradle dynamometer; a dynamotor operated from a 
1 10 volt direct current supply and delivering 18 amperes at 
no volts 500 cycles; two synchronous converters or double 
current generators, one compound wound and with corn- 
mutating fields, rated 10 kilowatts 250 volts direct current 
1-3-4-6-phase, the other of the split or regulating pole type, 
rated 8 kilowatts no volts 1-3-4-phase; a six anode grid 
controlled metal tank mercury arc rectifier, rated 12.5 
kilowatts 250 volts; a set consisting of two direct connected 
induction motors, one 10 horse-power 1200 rev. per min. 

[148] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

slip ring type, the other 5/10 horse-power 600/1200 rev. 
per min. squirrel cage type, for cascade operation at 
several speeds; three 220 volt 3-phase induction regulators 
for raising or lowering voltage 100 per cent, of 15, 13, 
and 10 kilovolt-ampere capacity, respectively; a 1 kilo- 
volt-ampere 20 volt phase advancer; a 3 kilovolt-ampere 
30,000 volt oil testing transformer; an oscillograph equipped 
for taking either rectangular or circular records. Miscel- 
laneous apparatus includes: condensers for power-factor 
correction; reactances, both air and iron core; rheostats; 
and starting devices. Meters are available for making any 
reading likely to be needed and include voltmeters (a. c. 
and d. c), ammeters (a. c. and d. c), wattmeters (single- 
phase and polyphase), current and voltage transformers, 
power-factor meters, frequency meters, watt-hour meters, 
tachometers, stroboscopes, and a synchronoscope. For 
checking and calibrating these instruments there is an 
assortment of precision instruments, including a potenti- 
ometer and laboratory standards. Included in the equip- 
ment of the communications laboratory are: a 20 to 10,000 
cycle beat frequency oscillator; an artificial line; transmis- 
sion measuring sets; a comparison vacuum tube voltmeter; 
a standard signal generator; two telephone repeaters; 
bridges including a precision capacity bridge; a I kilowatt 
short wave radio transmitter; radio receivers; radio fre- 
quency oscillators; dummy antennae; cathode ray oscillo- 
graphs; attenuation networks; wave analyzer; and instru- 
ments necessary to measure the quantities desired. 

The mechanical engineering laboratory equipment falls 
into seven general classes: steam, internal combustion, 
hydraulic, air, refrigeration, fuel, and lubricants testing ma- 

[ 149] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

chinery. The first class contains an 8 X 18 Murray-Corliss 
engine equipped with rope brake; a 7 X 7 vertical Wachs 
slide-valve engine with Stephenson reversing gear, two 6 X 
7 engines, and a 7 X 10 horizontal slide-valve engine, all 
with Prony brakes; a 6 X 4 X 6 duplex boiler feed pump; a 
20 kilowatt direct current De Laval turbo-generator set, 
nozzled for condensing and non-condensing operation and 
fitted with a brake-pulley which may be substituted for the 
generator; a 16 horse-power Lee impulse turbine driving a 
two-stage centrifugal pump; a steam turbine nozzle ar- 
ranged for experimental work; a similar equipment for 
calibration of steam orifices; a Westinghouse locomotive 
type air-compressor arranged for economy test; a demon- 
stration set-up of standard air-brake equipment; an air-lift 
pump model ; a 205 cubic foot Ingersoll-Rand 2 stage steam 
driven air compressor; and a 6 X 10 X 6 vertical compound 
Sturtevant engine. The machines are piped to exhaust 
either into the power-house stack or into four surface con- 
densers served by circulating and wet vacuum pumps. 

Internal combustion engines are represented by an ethyl 
series 30 knock testing engine, with bouncing-pin equip- 
ment; a 39 horse-power Waukesha Hesselman oil field type 
oil engine; a 20 horse-power fuel oil engine (Chicago Pneu- 
matic Tool Co.) ; a 15 horse-power Foos oil engine equipped 
with two types of governors giving opportunity for engine 
tests using either gas, kerosene, or gasoline as fuel ; a 3 horse- 
power Novo gasoline engine; Hall-Scott, Lawrance, Union, 
and Wright aeronautical engines; Chrysler, Ford V-8, and 
Willys-Knight automobile engines; and a Chevrolet auto- 
mobile engine with water-brake load. High speed automo- 
bile and aeroplane engines are tested with a 100 horse-power 

[150] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Sprague cradle dynamometer equipped with slotted bed- 
plate, gasoline metering device, and adjustable engine 
supports. A Hopkinson optical indicator with photo- 
graphic attachment is also provided. The refrigerating 
equipment includes a motor-driven 3-ton York compression 
machine with double-tube condenser, shell brine-cooler, 
brine-heater, and brine-pump. The hydraulic machinery 
consists of a 3-inch centrifugal pump and a 4 X 6 triplex 
pump, both driven by variable speed d. c. motor; an Evin- 
rude centrifugal pump direct-connected to a gasoline en- 
gine; a steam turbine driven 200 g.p.m. two stage centrifu- 
gal boiler-feed pump; a calibrated overhead tank; a con- 
crete storage cistern; four Venturi meters; a single tube 
manometer; a steam pulsometer; two weir boxes and 
notches; orifices, water meters, weighing tanks and scales, 
gauges, and the usual small accessories. In a separate fuel 
laboratory room is the equipment for testing fuels and oils. 
It includes complete Atwater and Parr coal-calorimeter out- 
fits; analytical balances; two types of Orsat flue-gas appara- 
tus; Scott and Saybolt viscosimeters; a Thurston coefficient 
of friction machine; a Navy type oil endurance testing ma- 
chine; Bureau of Mines and Cleveland flash point testers; 
Conradson carbon residue equipment; hydrometers and 
specific gravity apparatus; a Junker type gas calorimeter; 
platinum ware, drying oven, ball mill, etc. Boiler tests are 
made on a 20 horse-power vertical fire tube boiler equipped 
with the necessary pumps and weighing equipment. Tests 
of heat-treated steel may be made with the aid of the several 
electric and gas furnaces, pyrometers of electric, expansion, 
optical, potentiometer, and gas pressure types, scleroscope, 
Rockwell, and Brinnel ball machines. A metallurgical 

[151] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

microscope with specimen grinders, camera, and the usual 
accessories is also available. 

In addition, the laboratories contain a Sirocco blower 
driven by a calibrated motor, a plate blower, Pitot tubes, ori- 
fices, air Venturi meter, large and small gas meters, ane- 
mometers, injectors, dead weight pressure gauge testers, 
mechanical and neon stroboscopes, a heat-insulating test 
equipment, thermometer calibration apparatus, hoists, 
tachometers, steam calorimeters, the most popular gas and 
steam engine indicators, planimeters, standard gauges and 
thermometers. An insulated chamber with calibrated noz- 
zle allows tests of the steam and gas-fired unit heaters avail- 
able. For class-room demonstrations, a Cussons valve- 
setting model, several dozen sectioned models of intricate 
machines, and a collection of lantern slides, blue-prints, 
and curves are available. 

A standard moving-picture machine permits the exhibi- 
tion of the many films now loaned by manufacturers of 
engineering equipment. 

The machine shop contains machine tools of quite varied 
character, each selected for its peculiar fitness to illustrate 
the principles and common details of modern shop tools and 
methods. The lathe equipment consists of twelve machines : 
one 14 X 8 Le Blond cone-head lathe with taper attachment 
and double back gears; one 14 X 6 Hendey cone-head quick- 
change lathe; one 14 X 8 standard lathe; one 14 X 7 Pren- 
tice geared head quick-change lathe; one Prentice motor- 
driven 15 X 6 lathe; one Flather motor-driven 14 X 5 lathe; 
one 14 X 6 geared head quick-change Lodge and Shipley 
lathe; one 14 X 6 motor-driven Lodge and Shipley selective 
head lathe; a Rivett bench lathe; a Monarch 14 X 5 motor- 

[152] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

driven quick-change lathe; and two individual drive 14 X 6 
American high duty geared head engine lathes, one of these 
with turret attachment. The planer type of machine is rep- 
resented by a 16-inch back-geared Rockford shaper with 
compound head, and a 22 X 22 X 8 foot Gray planer. All 
kinds of plane surfaces can also be cut upon two Kempsmith 
and two Cincinnati universal milling machines, which are 
fitted with dividing heads for gear cutting, differential in- 
dexing, spiral grooving, etc., as well as a good variety of cut- 
ters. One Kempsmith machine is supplied with a universal 
milling attachment. A No. 12 Brown and Sharpe motor- 
driven universal grinder, and a Greenfield cutter grinder 
serve as practical examples of high-class precision machine 
tools. A graphical watt-meter permits tests of tool shapes 
and machinery conditions. A tilting brass-furnace, mould- 
ers' benches, wood lathes, band saw, jointer, sander, and 
the necessary small tools provide for simple pattern and 
foundry work. The metallurgical furnaces and equipment 
listed with the mechanical laboratory apparatus are also 
available for shop use. For miscellaneous work, a double- 
disc motor-driven disc grinder, a power oil-stone, work 
benches and vises, two hand-tool grinders, a power hack- 
saw, down-draft forges, a 20-inch drill-press, a sensitive 
drill, an arbor press, an air hammer, air and electric drills, 
portable electric grinders, a 100 pound Smith acetylene 
generator, twelve complete oxyacetylene welding outfits, 
and two electric arc welders (G. E. and Lincoln) are avail- 
able. A sufficient supply of small hand and machine tools, 
lathe sets, reference standards and precision measuring in- 
struments is issued on checks from a separate tool-room. 
About half the machine tools have individual motor drive. 

[153] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

The others are grouped about a line-shaft and a 15 horse- 
power motor. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

From the opening days of the Rice Institute the students 
have participated in the various forms of intramural and 
intercollegiate athletic contests, with the cooperation of the 
Committee on Outdoor Sports. Of other student organiza- 
tions, the first society actually to be formed was the Young 
Men's Christian Association. This step on the part of the 
young men was speedily followed by a similar one on the 
part of the young women in the organization of their branch 
of the college Young Women's Christian Association. The 
founding of these religious societies, both of which have con- 
tributed to the social life and the religious spirit of the place, 
was followed in the course of the early years by the forming 
of several literary societies: three by the young women, the 
oldest society bearing the name of Elizabeth Baldwin, wife 
of the founder of the Institute, a later organization known as 
the "Pallas Athene Literary Society," and the youngest, 
named the "Owen Wister Literary Society"; and three by 
the young men, known respectively as "The Owl Literary 
Society," the "Riceonian Literary and Debating Society," 
and a later organization, "The Congressional Club," organ- 
ized after the order of the House of Representatives and 
considering in debate leading public issues as they arise be- 
fore Congress. Under the auspices of these first literary 
societies the first of the undergraduate periodical publica- 
tions was undertaken, namely, "The Thresher," which ap- 
peared fortnightly from its initial number in January, 1916, 
to June, 1918, and has been published weekly since. Previ- 

[154] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ous to the organization of the staff of "The Thresher," the 
Class of 1916 made arrangements for the publication of the 
first class annual of the Institute, "The Campanile," which 
appeared in the spring of 191 6. The second and third vol- 
umes were issued by the Classes of 1917 and 1918, respec- 
tively, and subsequent annual editions have been published 
by the representatives of the student body as a whole. In 
addition to the student organizations mentioned above, va- 
rious departmental clubs and scientific societies have been 
contributing to the intellectual life of the Institute, one of 
the earliest of these being the Engineering Society, which 
was started in 1914, and which in recent years has been con- 
ducting as a student enterprise the biennial Rice Engineer- 
ing Show, a public exhibition of the activities of the engi- 
neering and science laboratories. The student body is or- 
ganized into a Students Association which serves as the 
official organ for the expression of student opinion and for 
the promotion of student enterprises; in particular, the un- 
dergraduate publications are now maintained under its 
auspices. A Students Council, elected by the Association, 
provides leadership in the Association. The president of the 
Association is president of the Council. The halls of resi- 
dence for men are governed by a student Hall Committee, 
under the general supervision of the Dean. 

Mr. William M. Rice, Jr., has provided a cabinet for the 
preservation and exhibition of trophies won by Rice teams 
in local and intercollegiate contests. This elaborate cabinet, 
designed by Mr. R. A. Cram, supervising architect of the 
Institute, is a most beautiful example of wood carving. 

Through the generosity of Mrs. James L. Autry, as a 
memorial to her husband, the late James L. Autry, of Hous- 

[155] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

ton, the Diocese of Texas of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church is maintaining in the immediate vicinity of the Rice 
Institute, Autry House, as a social and religious center. 
The corner stone of Autry House was laid during the com- 
mencement ceremonies of the Class of 1921. To this com- 
munity group of the Episcopal Church, Mrs. E. L. Neville, 
of Houston, in memory of her brother, the late Edward 
Albert Palmer, has contributed the beautiful Edward 
Albert Palmer Memorial Chapel, which was dedicated No- 
vember 27, 1927. All the opportunities of these establish- 
ments are available to the students of the Rice Institute 
irrespective of religious affiliation. Other religious bodies 
have intimated that they are considering future provision 
for similar undertakings in the neighborhood of the Rice 
Institute. 

Through personal association with several generations of 
Rice students, Mr. George Cohen, of Houston, was led to 
make generous provision for the Robert and Agnes Cohen 
House in honor of his parents, for long years well-known and 
highly respected citizens of Texas. This beautiful building, 
constructed in the materials and architecture of the first of 
the Rice quadrangles, designed to afford to the faculty the 
advantages of a club-house on the campus, was dedicated 
at the Annual homecoming meeting of the Association of 
Rice Alumni on Thanksgiving Day of the year 1927. 



156 



TWENTY-SECOND 
ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT 



TWENTY-SECOND 
ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT 

DEGREES IN COURSE CONFERRED 
JUNE 7, 1937 

At the twenty-second annual commencement convoca- 
tion of the Rice Institute held at the conclusion of the 
twenty-fifth academic session, the baccalaureate sermon 
was preached by the Right Reverend Henry Wise Hobson, 
D.D., Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church, Diocese 
of Southern Ohio, and the commencement address was 
delivered by Frank Pierrepont Graves, Ph.D., Litt.D., 
L.H.D., LL.D., President of the University of the State 
of New York and Commissioner of Education. On the 
recommendation of the Faculty and by the authority of the 
Trustees, the President of the Rice Institute, at the final 
ceremonies in the Academic Court on the morning of June 
7> x 937) conferred the following degrees respectively: 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Joe Abbate Margaret Catherine Austin 

Ward Noble Adkins Florence Audrey Bailey 

Florence Mai Albrecht Addison LaFayette Barnes 

Sarah Nell Allen Alfred Jules Barnston 

John Edwin Andrews Mary Catherine Barrett 

Kazko Arai Sarah Kendrick Bartlett 

Margaret Ashburn William Clarence Beaulieu 

[159] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Mary Maurice Belt 
William Neal Blanton, Jr. 
John William Brandenberger 
Ralph Jay Brookner — with 

honours in Mathematics 
Randall Earl Brooks 
Margaret Lynn Brosius 
Myrta Claire Brown 
Mabel Dorothy Burr — with 

honours in History 
Mary Elizabeth Burt 
Harry Irvin Bussa 
Frank Cavenagh, Jr. 
Dorothy Belle Chandler — 

with distinction 
William Stephens Clarke 
Helen Clevenger — with 

honours in Chemistry 
Mabelgrace Close 
Everett Dolton Collier 
Margaret Rae Collier 
Helen Inez Colvin 
Winfield Hollis Cook 
Harry William Crate 
Henriette Ida Daigle — 

with distinction 
Margaret Elinor Davis 
James Haines Degnan 
Lorry Constants Delambre 
Jean Elton Dorman 
Ruth Adair Dwigans 

[I 



William Rudolf Eckhardt, 

III 
Dorothy Loraine Ruff 

Edmundson 
Howard Lee Evans 
Vivian Elizabeth Fargerson 
Paul Lester Farren — with 

honours in Physics 
Marian Ferrin 
Mildred Dorothy Fink 
Ralph Hillin Fite 
Mary Madeline Flint 
Elizabeth Cardiff Floeter 
Frank Campbell Fourmy 
Josephine Jeter Fowler 
Minne Moore Gillespie 
Robert Raymond Gillis 
Mary Henrietta Glascock 
Leonard Lee Gleaves 
Wendell Chaffee Gordon — 

with distinction 
Charles William Goyen 
Andrew Davis Grant 
Howard Francis Gready 
James Thompson Griffiths, 

Jr. 
Mary Jane Hale 
Elizabeth Anne Hall 
Ruth Elizabeth Hardy 
Geraldine Violet Harris 
Albert Burke Haymes 

60] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Frances Marie Heyck 
Marjorie Audrey Hinzie 
Sellers Hosah Holloway 
Harry Newton Holmes — 

with distinction 
Ruth Elizabeth Holt 
Allene Marie Hopkins 
Olive Chesley Home 
Edwin Bonner House 
Marion Brown Hudson 
Richard Lee Hudson 
Emmett Leroy Hudspeth- 

with honours in Physics 
Jeanne Humphreville 
Lanelle Humphreville 
Mary Margaret Hurley 
Selwyn Percival Rice 

Hutchins 
Robert Enoch Hies 
Mary Lucille Jackson 
Dorothy Gladys Jewett 
Byron Kenneth Johnson 
Meta Kay 

Dorothy Bernadine Keller 
George Randolph King 
Hope Fuku Kobayashi 
Sol Rudy Kobb 
Roberta Lucille Gomperts 

LeClere 
Mildred Oliene Lee 
Regina Lorraine Levy 

[ 



Elizabeth Darden Lloyd — 

with distinction 
Frances Marshall Love — 

with distinction 
Alice Clare Luckel 
Jack McGregor Lynn 
Malcolm Thomas McCants 
Argyle McLachlan 
Helen Frances McNair 
William Lucius Maguire 
Anna Beth Kutschbach 

Maresh 
Elizabeth Ann Martin 
Betty Brent Maske — with 

distinction 
Mary Emily Miller — with 

honours in Chemistry 
Mary Lou Moore 
Dorothy La Verne Morgan 
Juliette de la Moriniere 
Harold Brett Morris 
Joseph Clifford Much 
Daniel Francis Murphy 
Mamie Hayako Nagai 
James Joseph Nallin, Jr. 
William Howard Nicholls 
Edgar Nirken 
Marjorie Elizabeth Nitze 
Marian Pearson 
Patricia Pearson 
James Clifford Petty, Jr. 

161 ] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Doris Eletta Poole 
Thomas Edward Pulley 
Helen Ingram Putnam 
Travis Holland Redman 
Hugo Kittrell Reid 
Elizabeth Jane Rieger 
David Dean Robinson 
Marinel Rochelle 
Marguerite Moilliet Rogers 

— with honours in Physics 
Jay Harold Rose — with 

honours in English 
Cornelius O'Brien Ryan — 

with honours in English 
Muriel Elaine Sadlier — • 

with honours in Chemistry 
Peter Lester Scardino, Jr. 
James Curtiss Schiller — 

with honours in Chemistry 
William Vesper Schleeter — 

with distinction 
George Cecil Schnitzer, Jr. 
Ida Mary Schnurr — with 

distinction 
Jerome Joe Segal 
Clemille Franklin Sellers 
Anna Beth Shapley 
Dowlen Shelton 
A. Frank Smith, Jr. 
Eleanore Dorothy Smith 
Eliphlet Arnold Smith 



Harold John Smith 
Rodger Grigsby Smyth 
Ruth Elizabeth Lehmann 

Sorrell 
John Wesley Sparks 
Elwood Enoch Stark 
Rose Lee Stein 
Rosanne Violet Stephen 
Eleanor Adriance Stevens 
Boude Erwin Storey 
Richard Elwood Stout 
Frank B. King Sullivan 
Ruth Eloise Surles 
Homer Carroll Talley 
Harold Jack Tausend 
Ruth Edna Tausend — with 

distinction 
John Henry Tenery, Jr. 
Virginia Marion Thornton 
Maurice Meyer Tinterow 
Christopher Garrett 

Townes 
John Bowles Trible — with 

honours in Biology 
Mary Ellen Triplett 
Martha Brice Vinson 
Charles Frank Vogt 
Mary Virginia Wall 
William McVicker Wallis 
Chester Herman Weber 
Lloyd Posey Webre 

[ 162 ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



David Richard Weichert 
Dorothy Boyer Weiser 
Evelyn Alberta Werner 
David Westheimer 
Robert Daniel White 
Elsie Alber Wilkie 



Edward Carson Williams 
Mary Eugenia Williamson 
Joan Ferrar Wilson 
Dorothy Janice Wisenberg 
— with distinction 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Forrest Bedford Burrell 
Theron Tilford Collins, Jr. 
Bernard Meredith Fisher 
Ben Frederick Frederick, Jr. 
Clifford Otis Graff 
Nathaniel Greene Haseltine 
Charles Henry Homer, II 
David Stewart Howard, Jr. 
Earl Ewald Huebotter 



William Kenyon Jackson 
Henry Blandin Jones 
Charles Edwin Ladner 
James Harry Long 
Walter Steen Myers 
Karl Harberg Sherman 
William Aaron Stanford 
Karl Cornelius ten Brink- 
with distinction 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Joseph Lyndon Boyd Henry Allen Jackson 

Howard William Collins James Marshall Manuel 

David Oscar Roemer 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

William Eugene Brice Roy Shelton McDaniel 

James Monroe Bryan David Paul Walsh 

Byron Williams 



[163] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Edward Cooksley Boyle 
Fred Briggs, Jr. 
William Oscar Brown 
Willard Ewing Buck 
Theodore Huder Dwyer — 

with distinction 
James McFarland Fowler 
Jerome Duncan Goodrich 
Marvin Henderson 

Greenwood 



James Louis Henderson 
Ernest Wilbur Keating 
Walter Emanuel Liljestrand 
Stanley Cockrell Moore 
Berney Lambeth Morgan 
Wilford Victor Morris 
William Frank Procter 
John Edwin Wallace 
Merrill Clair Wright 
Henry Ben Young, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Rochester Thomas Eaton, 

Jr. 
John Robert Forbes 
Joseph Walter Friedman 
Joe Alexander Morris 



Richard Royster Royall 
Harris Wilkins Shelton— 

with distinction 
J. T. Smith, Jr. 
John Michael White 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE 



James Karl Dunaway 
George Pete Fasullo 
Mary Caroline Gates 
Risdon Oliver Gribble 



Delwin Vernon James 
Tom Polk Miller 
Mary Isabel Mount 
Frances Young: 



[164] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



MASTER OF ARTS 



Walter Goode Appleby 
Nolan Ell more Barrick 
Floreine Anthea Borgstrom 
William Joseph Coppoc 
Richard De Young, Jr. 
Margaret Modena Elkins 



Caroline Spencer Foulks 
Hazel May Graf 
Helen Elizabeth Johnston 
Eby Nell McElrath 
Mary Aiko Nagai 
Edward Howard Smith 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Joseph Ilott Davies Frank House Hurley, Jr. 

Ernest Carlton Kennedy 



[165I 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 
SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED FOR 1937-38 

THE GRAHAM BAKER STUDENTS 

(Alphabetical) 

Katherine Tsanoff, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
Dorothy Georgia Zylicz, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 

HONOURABLE MENTION FOR THE GRAHAM BAKER 
STUDENTSHIP 

(Alphabetical) 

Evelyn Hope Beaulieu, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
Samuel William Cruse, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
Grace Sigel Griffith, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
John Frank Hairston, Class 1939, of Houston, Texas 
Andrew Wetherbee McReynolds, Class 1938, of Sherman, 

Texas 
Harold Marsh, Jr., Class 1939, of Tyler, Texas 
Nat Huyler Marsh, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
Anne Catherine Moore, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
Dorothy Eloise Morgan, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
James Kinchen Nance, Class 1938, of Fort Worth, Texas 
William Cox Perry, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
Doris Lee Schild, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 

THE HOHENTHAL SCHOLARS 

(Alphabetical) 

William Hugh Lane, Class 1938, of Marshall, Texas 
John Keith McGary, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 

[166] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Harold Marsh, Jr., Class 1939, of Tyler, Texas 
Henry Madison Morris, Jr., Class 1939, of Houston, Texas 
Meredith Morgan Sparks, Class 1938, of Harlingen, Texas 
Willoughby Claiborne Williams, Class 1939, of Houston, 
Texas 

THE SCHOLAR OF THE JOHN MCKNITT ALEXANDER CHAPTER, 
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Marguerite Bailey, Class 1940, of Houston, Texas 

THE ELLEN AXSON WILSON SCHOLAR 

Margaret Ellen Williams, Class 1939, of Houston, Texas 

THE ELIZABETH BALDWIN LITERARY SOCIETY SCHOLAR 

James Kinchen Nance, Class 1938, of Fort Worth, Texas 

THE PALLAS ATHENE LITERARY SOCIETY SCHOLAR 

Dorothy Eloise Morgan, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 

THE DANIEL RIPLEY SCHOLARS 

{Alphabetical) 

Charles Gardner Dodd, Class 1940, of Omaha, Nebraska 
Charles Wilson Malich, Class 1940, of Somerville, Texas 

THE JUNIOR ENGINEERING SCHOLAR 

Cyril Harold Delevanti, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 

[167] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

THE EDITH RIPLEY SCHOLARS 

(Alphabetical) 

Reba Alice Beeler, Class 1939, of Addicks, Texas 
Dorothy Virginia Daigle, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 
Helen Scarborough, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 

THE MARY PARKER GIESEKE SCHOLAR 

Clarence Samuel Coe, Class 1938, of Phoenix, Arizona 

THE THOMAS AUBREY DICKSON AND PAULINE MARTIN DICKSON 

SCHOLARS 

(Alphabetical) 

William Augustus Denbrock, Class 1939, of Cleveland, 

Ohio 
William Cox Perry, Class 1938, of Houston, Texas 

THE SAMUEL FAIN CARTER FELLOW 

Walter Tandy Scott, B.A. (Rice) 1933, M.A. (Rice) 1935, 
of San Antonio, Texas 

THE FRIENDS OF RICE SCHOLARS 

(Alphabetical) 

J. R. Green, Class 1940, of Houston, Texas 

John Frank Hairston, Class 1939, of Houston, Texas 

Reinhart Stanzel, Class 1939, of Schulenburg, Texas 

THE LADY GEDDES PRIZE IN WRITING 

Ethel Crane Bloomfield, Class 1940, of Houston, Texas 

[168] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE CHAPMAN-BRYAN MEMORIAL SCHOLAR 

Anne Marie Smith, Class 1938, of Fairbanks, Texas 

THE LADY WASHINGTON TEXAS CENTENNIAL AWARD 

Mary Jane Quinby, Class 1939, of Houston, Texas 

THE KATIE B. HOWARD SCHOLAR 

Dorothy Lee Wroe, Class 1939, of Houston, Texas 

THE MARY ALICE ELLIOTT LOAN FUND FOR 
FOREIGN TRAVEL AND STUDY IN ARCHITECTURE 

Nolan Ellmore Barrick, BA. (Rice) 1935, B.S. in Architec- 
ture (Rice), 1936, MA. (Rice) 1937, of Houston, Texas 



[169] 



LIST OF STUDENTS 

1937-38 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Barnes, Addison LaFayette . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Bates, John Bertram* . . . Big Flats, New York 

B.S., Clarkson College of Technology, 
1936 
Bell, Paul Frank Lafayette, Louisiana 

B.S., Southwestern Louisiana 
Institute, 1937 
Bland, John Dietrich .... Memphis, Tennessee 

B.S., Spring Hill College, 1937 
Brady, Kenneth Dallas, Texas 

B.S. in C.E., Rice, 1933 
Buck, Willard Ewing .... Phoenix, Arizona 

B.S. in M.E., Rice, 1937 
Claypool, Martha Jane* . . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1934 
Coppoc, William Joseph* . . Ashland, Kansas 

B.S., Ottawa University, 1935 

M.A., Rice, 1937 
Crate, Harry William .... Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Delambre, Lorry Constants . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 

""Candidacy for advanced degree approved . 

[ 173] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Dunaway, James Karl* . . . Bellville, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1936 

B.S. in Arch., Rice, 1937 
Ebaugh, Bessie Monroe . . . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Tulane University of 
Louisiana, 1925 

M.A., Columbia University, 1927 
Elder, Donald Everly .... Houston, Texas 

B.A., Wittenberg College, 1932 

Bach, of Divinity, Wittenberg 
College, 1934 
Elkin, Price Bush* Midland, Texas 

B.A., Harvard University, 1937 
Evans, Julian Frank* .... Norman, Oklahoma 

B.A., Oklahoma University, 1926 

M.S., Oklahoma University, 1932 
Fariss, Ira Wilson Chilton, Texas 

B.A., Baylor University, 1936 
Ferguson, William Murray . Houston, Texas 

B.S. in Ch.E., Rice, 1935 
Fisher, Wilton Monroe* . . . Fort Worth, Texas 

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1932 

M.S., University of Oklahoma, 1937 
Gates, Marshall DeMotte, Jr.* Port Arthur, Texas 

B.S. in Ch.E., Rice, 1936 
Goyen, Charles William* . . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Hudspeth, Emmett Leroy* . Arlington, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Jones, Sarah Nancy* .... Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1936 

[ 174] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Lenoir, Louise Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1929 

M.A., Rice, 1930 
Lewis, James Vernon* . . . Berkeley, California 

B.A., University of California, 1937 



Love, Frances Marshall* . , 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
McCants, Malcolm Thomas* 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
McElrath, Eby Nell* . . . , 

B.A., Rice, 1935 

MA., Rice, 1937 
McGee, James Butler, Jr. . , 

B.A., Rice, 1936 
McWilliams, John Ford . . . 



Houston, Texas 



Houston, Texas 



Gainesville, Texas 



Houston, Texas 



Shreveport, Louisiana 



B.S., Louisiana State University, 1937 



Houston, Texas 



Martin, Margaret Lee 

B.A., Rice, 1931 

M.A., Rice, 1933 
Miller, Mary Emily . . 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Miron, Simon* Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1936 
Much, Joseph Clifford 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Murphy, Daniel Francis 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Nash, John Purcell* . . 

B.A., University of California, 1936 
Neilan, Bernece Imogene . . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1934 

[175] 



Houston, Texas 



Alvin, Texas 
Galveston, Texas 
San Diego, California 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Nicholls, William Howard . . San Antonio, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Norris, Richard Sylvester, Jr. Galveston, Texas 

B.A., St. Edward's University, 1935 
Offutt, Edward Preble, Jr.* . Southboro, Massachusetts 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1935 
Pulley, Thomas Edward . . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Reade, Maxwell Ossian* . . Brooklyn, New York 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1936 

M.A., Harvard University, 1937 
Red, David Douglass .... Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1936 
Robinson, David Dean . . . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Rogers, Fred Terry, Jr.* . . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1935 

M.A., Rice, 1936 
Rogers, Marguerite Moilliet* Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Rose, Jay Harold* Bryan, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Royall, Richard Royster . . Houston, Texas 

B.S. in Ph. Ed., Rice, 1937 
Sanders, Floreine Anthea 

Borgstrom Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1935 

M.A., Rice, 1937 
Schiller, James Curtiss* . . . Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 

[176] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Scott, Walter Tandy* .... San Antonio, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1933 

M.A., Rice, 1935 
Segal, Jerome Joe Houston, Texas 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Sellers, Clemille Franklin . 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
Stevens, Eleanor Adriance . 

B.A., Rice, 1937 
ten Brink, Karl Cornelius 

B.S. in Ch. E., Rice, 1937 
White, Robert Daniel . . 

B.A., Rice, 1937 



Houston, Texas 
Angleton, Texas 
Wichita Falls, Texas 
Ennis, Texas 



SENIORS' 



Adams, Charles Henry, Jr. 
Alexander, Warren Amos . 
Alexander, Woodrow Wilson 
Andrews, Lillian Marguerite 
Aves, Frankie Murphy 
Bailey, Scott Field . . 
Baird, Kenneth Hunter 
Baird, Raleigh William, Jr. 
Banta, Norman Hollis 
Barker, John H. . . . 
Beaulieu, Evelyn Hope 
Bell, Bernard Israel 
Beman, John Shoomer 
Blair, Mary Margaret 
Blanton, Dorothy Elizabeth 
*As classified October 1, 1937. 

[1 



. Galveston, Texas 

. Fairbanks, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Dallas, Texas 

. Electra, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

77] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Blanton, Edlar Bacon, Jr. 
Bohrer, Lyle Edwin . . 
Boice, Edward Henry 
Brandon, William Dale . 
Bresky, Ruby Lee . . . 



Houston, Texas 
Beaumont, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



Broadway, Kathryn Frances . Houston, Texas 



Brown, Elizabeth Malvina 
Buhler, Martha 
Burkhart, Hugh Reginald 
Burns, Marie Olga 
Burrell, Rebecca Frances 
Burton, Royce Lyle . 
Byers, Billie Louise 
Campbell, Max Berkley 
Campbell, Patterson 

Fitzgerald, Jr. . . . 
Campise, Nash Oscar . 
Coe, Clarence Samuel 
Cook, Clem Howard . 
Cooper, Mary Alice 
Cornelison, Boyd, Jr. . 
Couzens, Ellen Rea . . 
Cox, Jane Wingate . . 
Cruse, Samuel William 
Daigle, Dorothy Virginia 
Davis, Eleanor Grace . 
Delambre, Bobbye Faye 

Roberts 

Delevanti, Cyril Harold 
Dill, Herbert Clyde . 
Dudley, Mary Margaret 



. Henderson, Texas 
, Victoria, Texas 

Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 

Fort Worth, Texas 

Las Cruces, New Mexico 
Houston, Texas 
Phoenix, Arizona 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 
San Antonio, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



[178] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Dunlap, Henry Francis 
DuPree, Raymond Benjamin 
Ellis, Mary Frances 
Evans, George Keiser . 
Evans, Sarah Catherine 
Farmer, Martha Adelia 
Farrington, Curtis Leon 
Felton, Jack Bert . . 
Fennelle, Charles Edwin 
Floyd, Louis Carl . . 
Forbes, Edward King . 
Fosselman, Mary Eleanor 
Francis, Edward Lysaght 
Frankie, John .... 
Gerland, Hazel Aileen 
Gibson, Kathlyn Bell . 
Gladish, Virginia Dell 
Glover, Robert Milner, Ji 
Graham, Sue Thomson 
Greenwood, Mary Lois 
Greer, Carl Ferrell . . 
Greer, Kathryn Ella . 
Greve, Thomas Edmonds 
Griffith, Grace Sigel 
Gripon, Margery Elise 
Guthrie, Mary Virna . 
Hall, Lewis Tyus . . 
Hamblen, Tolar Numa, Ji 
Handly, Rita Cornelia 
Hatcher, Elissa Ruth . 
Holden, Everitt Russ . 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Waco, Texas 
Wink, Texas 
Electra, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Los Fresnos, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
A mar Mo, Texas 
Lafayette, Louisiana 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



I 179] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Holloman, Mary Bernice . . Houston, Texas 

Holm, Herbert Ernest . . . Houston, Texas 

Hughes, Arthur Thomas . . San Antonio, Texas 

Hughes, George Griffin, Jr. . Lafayette, Louisiana 

Hurley, Henry Charles, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

Jacobs, Louis Kleinsmith . . Houston, Texas 

James, Patrick Henry . . . Houston, Texas 

Jarvis, Walter Hearne, Jr. . . Grand Saline, Texas 

Johnson, Celeste Louise . . . Houston, Texas 

Johnson, Tiffin Elmore, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

Jones, Roy Victor Weinert, Texas 

Karkalits, Olin Carroll, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

Keeper, Zelda Lea Houston, Texas 

Kelley, Mary Anne Houston, Texas 

Kendall, William Theodore . Houston, Texas 

Kilpatrick, Julia Lillian . . . Bellaire, Texas 

Kishi, Ai Houston, Texas 

Klindvvorth, Clifford Walter . Dallas, Texas 

Krueger, Alba Virginia . . Houston, Texas 

Lancaster, York Houston, Texas 

Lane, William Hugh .... Marshall, Texas 

Lefevre, Ortrud Virginia . . Houston, Texas 

Levin, Ben San Antonio, Texas 

Levingston, Clarence William Orange, Texas 

Lilliott, Martha Ruth Bartels Houston, Texas 

Lilliott, Miriam Jean .... Houston, Texas 

Lindsay, Bert Wetzel .... Houston, Texas 

Livergood, Russell Houston, Texas 

McAnneny, Adrian Wilson . San Antonio, Texas 

McBride, Bonnie Delle . . . Houston, Texas 

McCown, Thomas Ashby . . Alvin, Texas 

[180] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Clarendon, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



Houston, Texas 
Port Arthur, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



McDowell, Lila Beth . 
McElya, Fred Herbert 
McGaffey, Mary Jane 
McGary, John Keith . 
Mclntyre, Lillian Hazel 
McKee, Robert Lambert 
McLelland, Margaret Rose 
McMahon, John Leo . . 
McReynolds, Andrew 

Wetherbee Sherman, Texas 

Mace, A. R., Jr Houston, Texas 

Mackey, George Whitelaw . Houston, Texas 

Mansfeld, Louise Margaret 

Marsh, Arthur Paul . . , 

Marsh, Nat Huyler . . , 

Mason, Thomas Robert . . 

Matlage, William Theodore, Jr. Sugar Land, Texas 

Matthews, Mary Marshall . Houston, Texas 

May, Herbert Cleveland . . Houston, Texas 

Melton, Milton Ernest . . . Allen, Texas 

Meroney, Geraldine Marie . Houston, Texas 

Merrill, Frances Houston, Texas 

Meyer, Mary Louise Dinsmoor Houston, Texas 

Millsap, Margaret Louise . . Houston, Texas 

Minto, Mary Barbara . . 

Moore, Anne Catherine . . 

Moore, Charles Edward, Jr 

Morgan, Dorothy Eloise 

Motheral, George Edmundson Houston, Texas 

Muir, Andrew Forest .... Houston, Texas 

Mullis, Alfred Roggie .... Camden, Arkansas 

[181] 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Muske, Ida Aileen Brookshire, Texas 



Nagel, Nancy Glenn . . . 

Naman, Israel Adrian . . 

Nance, James Kinchen . . 

Neece, John Prendergast, Jr. 

Nichols, Ralph Gregory . . 

Norman, William Harvey . 

Norsworthy, William Herbert Bastrop, Louisiana 

O'Riordan, Mildred Gaines . Houston, Texas 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Mexia, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 



Orman, Forrest Clarence 
Orr, Willis Poindexter 
Pace, Jimmie Lucien . . 
Park, Frances Marie . . 
Parsons, Richard Lewis . 
Peden, Alexander Phillips 
Perry, William Cox . . 
Peterson, Mary Beth . . 
Pfeiffer, Paul Edwin . . 
Pilkenton, Ruth .... 
Pope, Robert Parks . . 
Rack, Armin Harold . . 
Reed, William Forsythe . 
Rembert, Hannah Juanita 
Resch, Marie . . . 
Reuter, Pauline Julia 
Richter, Annie Ruth 
Riordan, Robert Polk 
Robbins, John Dana 
Roberts, Lee Fermon, Jr. 
Roberts, Thomas Hiram 
Roddy, Thomas Carl, Jr. 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Mokelumne Hill, California 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Waco, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Ennis, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 
Houston, Texas 
Rosebud, Texas 
Port Arthur, Texas 



182 ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Rogde, William James . . . El Paso, Texas 

Rothstein, Rebecca Cissy . . Houston, Texas 

Saba, Helen Port Arthur, Texas 

Scarborough, Helen Kathleen Houston, Texas 

Schaffer, Randolph Lee . . . Rosenberg, Texas 

Scheffler, Cleophas Joseph . . Yorktown, Texas 

Schild, Doris Lee Houston, Texas 

Simmons, Malcolm Cleveland Houston, Texas 

Sinclair, James Alfred . . . Memphis, Tennessee 

Sisk, Eugene Bounds, Jr. . . Houston, Texas 

Slataper, Felicia Houston, Texas 

Slater, Jean Miriam .... Houston, Texas 

Smith, Anne Marie Fairbanks, Texas 

Sparks, Meredith Morgan . . Harlingen, Texas 

Spragins, Franklin Keller . . Houston, Texas 

Sprague, Virginia San Francisco, California 

Stark, Benjamin Olin .... Houston, Texas 

Sterling, Albert Alexander, Jr. Houston, Texas 

Stern, Henry Adolph, Jr. . . Demopolis, Alabama 

Stockdick, W. C, Jr Katy, Texas 

Stockton, Jane Houston, Texas 

Stoneburner, Clarence Willis . Texas City, Texas 

Strozier, Mary Margaret . . Houston, Texas 

Sullivan, Eleanor Katherine . Houston, Texas 

Swilley, Lee Tuer Houston, Texas 

Sylvester, Robert Lloyd . . . Brownsville, Texas 

Talley, William Henry, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

Tebbs, Judith Cowne .... Hamilton, Virginia 

Townley, Lucille Frances . . Houston, Texas 

Treadwell, John Holland . . Menard, Texas 

Tsanoff, Katherine Houston, Texas 

[183] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Tungate, Mace, Jr 

Turner, Margaret Ann . . . 
Vale, Wylie Walker . . . . 

Vawter, Jean Ray 

Vickers, Thomas Francis . . 
Wagner, Urban Harry, Jr. 
Wagner, Virginia Lindsley 

Bratten 

Wagoner, Arthur Lawrence . 
Wallace, Marie Marrast . . 
Walthall, Louise Charlotte 

Warren, Margaret 

Watkin, Florence Rosemary . 
Webster, John Bookhout . . 
Wertheimer, Haskell Maurice 
Weyrich, Mary Jane . . . . 
Williams, Dorothy Virginia . 
Williams, Robert Moroney 
Williamson, Jane Winifred 
Wissinger, John Earl . 
Witte, Frank Davis 
Wolfram, Lionel Foster 
Wright, Byron Terry . 
Wyatt, Gene Marshall 
Young, Reginald Gladish 
Zylicz, Dorothy Georgia 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Arlington, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
De Leon, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



JUNIORS* 

Adams, George Scott, Jr. . . Fort Worth, Texas 
Ahlrich, Edward Will .... Houston, Texas 
*As classified October i, 1937. 

[184] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Allen, Marguerite Faye . 
Alvarez, William Lopez . 
Anderson, Thomas John 
Armstrong, John Gilbert 

Arnold, Edwin 

Arthur, Harry Sinclair . 
Ashley, Emma Louise 
Bakke, Oliver Mathias, Jr. 
Barnard, James Lawrence 
Barton, Marguerite Ruth 
Beeler, Audrey Elizabeth 
Beeler, Reba Alice . . . 
Bell, Calvin Oschar . . . 
Bell, John Floyd .... 
Bennett, Betty Bright. . 
Berry, Jack Francis . . 
Bethany, Mary Evangeline 
Bethea, Sam Rice . . . 

Blocker, Lee 

Blondeau, Eleanor Irene 
Bonner, Frances Campbell 
Boucher, Giles Walter 
Brandt, Ruth Geraldine . 
Brewer, Lucile Sam . . 
Brown, Jerry Alice . . . 
Browning, Robert Leuschner 
Bryan, Lucille Ann .... 
Buddington, John Frederick 
Burchfield, Robert Howland 
Burns, Albert Leroy, Jr. 
Bush, John William . . . 

[i 



Evant, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Bay City, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, 



Houston 
Houston 
Houston 



Corpus Christi, Texas 



. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Harwood 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Dallas, 
. Houston 
. Houston 
. Waco, Texas 

85] 



Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 



Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 
Texas 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Calma, Victor Charles 
Campbell, Alfred Towles 

Carr, Bert 

Carroll, Helen Elizabeth 
Carter, Donald James 
Carter, Mary Frances 
Chambers, John Sherman, Jr 
Chambers, Octavia Zenobia . 
Coffee, Dan Eaton . . 
Collins, Francis Albert 
Collins, Joseph Vincent 
Cook, Arthur Aaron 
Cooke, Robert Sidney 
Coons, Donald William 
Corless, Florence Ann 
Crawford, Dawn Constance . 
Crawford, John Franklin, Jr. 
Curtis, Mary Louise .... 
Daugherty, F. Morton, Jr. 

Davis, Annie Pearl 

Dawson, David Duncan, Jr. . 
Dawson, Ralph Malone . . . 
Denbrock, William Augustus . 
Denman, Mary Anne .... 
DeWitt, Cape Gassner . . . 
Dodson, Joseph Jackson . . 
Dyer, Robert Dreher .... 

Eckert, Mary Alice 

Ehrhardt, Catherine 

Elizabeth 

Elliott, Ruth Marthalynn . . 

[ 1 86 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Bay City, Texas 
Bay town, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Omaha, Nebraska 
San Antonio, Texas 
Vernon, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Kansas City, Missouri 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Beaumont, Texas 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Lufkifi, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Evans, Robert Lee . . . 
Ferguson, James Hollister 
Fields, Roger Quarless 
Finger, Joseph Seifter 
Fish, Harry Alexander . 
Flanagan, Frances Irene 
Forristall, George David 
Foulks, Alice Cary . . 
Foulks, James G. . . 
Ganchan, Richard Price 
Gay, Rita Claire . . . 
Gillette, Reagan Word 
Goodson, Alfred Clement 
Grant, David Norvell 

Walker, Jr 

Guinn, Alliene 

Haggard, Samuel Edward 
Hail, Mary Virginia . . 
Hairston, John Frank 
Hall, Donald Lewis . . 
Hall, John Dorrance . . 
Hamilton, Julian Price . 
Hancock, Paul Clement . 
Hanks, Jackson Holcomb 
Hannah, Mary Bloomfield 
Hargrove, Robert Clyde 
Hayes, Albert Harvey 
Heaps, Stanley Newton . 
Henry, Mary Elizabeth . 
Hersey, Martha Elizabeth 
Hill, Maurice Kenneth . 



. Houston, Texas 

. Dallas, Texas 

. Tyler, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Beaumont, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Barksdale Field, Louisiana 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. El Campo, Texas 

. Palestine, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. San Angelo, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 



[187] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Hindelang, Paul Edwin 
Holden, William John 
Holt, Ann Dexter . . 
Hotmann, Charles Allan 
Houston, William 

Lynnville, Jr. . . . 
Huckett, Dorothy Eleanore 
Hueter, Anne Elizabeth 
Hunter, Sibyl Lenora . 
Hyman, Max .... 
Jackson, Herbert Brooks 
Jackson, Thomas Hardy, Jr 
John, John Spaulding . . 
Johnson, Artelle Katherine 
Johnson, Cary Neil, Jr. . 
Johnson, Margaret Jean 
Jones, Robert Murph . . 
Jones, Williams Paul . . 
Junker, Evelyn Elizabeth 
Keck, David Richard . . 
Kegg, David Champion . 
Kilgore, Clarence Boyd . 

King, Floy 

Kubricht, Theo James . 
Kunover, Mary Ursula . 
LaGrange, Lester, Jr. . . 
Landry, Matthew Andrew 
Lane, Jonathan .... 
Laurence, Ernie Leo . . 
Lederer, George William 
Leigh, Richard Eugene, Jr. 

[i 



San Antonio, Texas 
Queretaro, Qro., Mexico 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
La Porte, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Stephenville, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Marshall, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Goose Creek, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Wallis, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Amherst, Texas 
Port A rthur, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Thornton, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

»] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Letscher, Carl Edward . 
Lewis, Clarence Irwin 
Lockwood, Pattye Gene 
Lord, Elizabeth Florence 

Low, Billy D 

Lucia, Joseph Paul . . . 
Lyne, William Henry . . 
Lyttleton, Donald V. . . 
McCulley, John Howard 



Port Arthur, Texas 
Texas City, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 



McFadyen, Robert Woody 

McKee, Ross Anten Mills, Ontario, 

Canada 

McNellie, Lucile Josephine . Houston, Texas 

McWhinney, Roy LeClaire . Houston, Texas 

Maniscalco, James Houston, Texas 

Marsh, Harold, Jr Tyler, Texas 

Marshall, John Lee Sherman, Texas 



Cameron, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Hondo, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



Martin, John Calhoun 
Martin, Maurine Lafava 
Mechler, Floyd Alfred . . 
Meyer, Lucille Rucker . 
Meyer, Virginia Mignonne 
Meyers, Dean Mortimer 
Miller, Ada Frances . . 

Miller, Byron E Houston, Texas 

Mills, Arthur Douglas . . . Ponca City, Oklahoma 
Minto, William Munro . . . Houston, Texas 
Montgomery, Elizabeth 

Roberta Houston, Texas 

Morris, Henry Madison, Jr. . Houston, Texas 
Morris, Mary Beth Houston, Texas 

[l8 9 ] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Moser, Charles Frank 
Mott, Evie Margaret . 
Moyer, Robert Irving 
Muse, James Milton . 
Naschke, John Hess . 
Neeld, Harvey Jackson 
Nethery, Harriet Jane 
Palmer, Jeanne Eloise 
Parker, Herbert Bryce, Jr. 
Parker, Ross Orville, Jr. 
Parsons, Robert Lowrey 
Patterson, Jack .... 
Pearlstone, Julius Hart, Jr. 
Perkins, Mildred .... 
Perryman, Butler . . . 
Peters, John Emmett . . 
Phillips, James Olcott 
Phillips, Wendell Earl . 
Picton, Martha Ann . . 
Piatt, John Arthur, Jr. . 
Powers, Bess Angela . . 
Price, Herman Dee . . . 
Price, Sterling David, III 
Purcell, William Robert 
Quinby, Mary Jane 
Rau, Charles Brooks . 
Rheinlander, Clarence Ernest 
Richardson, Dean Edward 
Robinson, Garland John . . 



De Kalb, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Plain, New York 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 
Nacogdoches, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Merkel, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Mattoon, Illinois 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 
Beaumont, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



Robinson, Glenn William 

Roe, Ralph Porter Frederick, Oklahoma 

[ 190] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Rogers, Jimmie D. . . . 
Rollosson, Clare Kiesling 
Roome, Walter Cecil . 
Rylander, Clanton, Jr. 
Sakowitz, Louise . . . 
Salmeron, Pedro, Jr. . 
Sanders, Paul Hurshel 
Saunders, James Robert 
Schley, Peter Alfred . . 
Schnell, Mary Catherine 
Schramm, Weldon Alfred 
Schuehle, Charles John . 
Schwartz, Margaret Helen 
Scott, Floyd Logan, Jr. 
Seale, William Wesley 
Sharp, William Elliott 
Shepherd, James Alan 
Sherman, Wanda Hill 
Shirk, Paul Ober . . . 
Shoultz, George Alton 
Simons, Courtney Stuart 
Sinclair, Agnes Irene . 
Smedes, Marian . . . 
Stanzel, Reinhart . . 
Staples, John Charles . 
Steakley, Elbert Y., Jr. 
Steen, Frank William . 
Stell, Jack Powell . . 
Stevens, Mary Lucille 
Stone, Yarina Gould . 
Stoner, John Randolph, Jr. 



. Greenville, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Louise, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

. Houston, Texas 

. Dallas, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Shiner, Texas 

. Hondo, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. San Antonio, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Pasadena, Texas 

. Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 

. Bay City, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Schulenburg, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Dallas, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Kinsley, Kansas 



[191] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Stoner, Wiley Alan . . . 

Sullivan, Virgil Douglas . 

Thomas, James Bates, Jr. 

Tilton, Elvin James . . 

Tilton, Rollin Jack . . . 

Todd, Louis Clayton . . 

Volkmann, Edmund Russell 

Wallace, Earl .... 

Wallace, William Brooks 

Walters, Edward Earle 
Walthall, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Watson, Robert Allan 
Watt, Bob Everet . . . 
Whalen, Francis .... 
White, Margaret Valerie 
Whiteman, John Richard 
Williams, Margaret Ellen 
Williams, Robert Fleetwood 
Williams, Sartor Otho, Jr. . 
Williams, William Edgar, Jr. 
Williams, Willoughby 

Claiborne 

Willrich, June Evelyn 
Wilson, Armin Guschel . 
Wilson, James Monroe . 
Winters, William Gardner 
Wood, Alene Turner . . 
Wood, Catherine Frances 
Woodward, Leah Mary . 
Woolf , Doris Stout . . . 
Word, Grace 



. Kinsley, Kansas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Longview, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Waco, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Waco, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Tulsa, Oklahoma 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Ardmore, Oklahoma 

. Houston, Texas 

. Wichita Falls, Texas 

. Shreveport, Louisiana 
New Willard, Texas 



. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Tulsa, Oklaho?na 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 



[ 192] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Wroe, Dorothy Lee .... Houston, Texas 

Wyatt, Oscar Dean, Jr. . . . Fort Worth, Texas 

Zapp, Dorothy Houston, Texas 

Ziegler, Julius Fred Petty, Texas 



SOPHOMORES* 

Albanese, Philip Alief, Texas 

Amerman, Jack Almeron . . Houston, Texas 
Anderson, Clarence Lloyd, Jr. Bellaire, Texas 
Anderson, James Robertson, 

Jr Galveston, Texas 

Appling, Howell Redus, Jr. . Beaumont, Texas 

Atkinson, Vernon Thurman 

Bailey, Marguerite . . . 

Bair, Joe Keagy .... 

Baldwin, Robert John 

Ballew, William Virgil, Jr 

Banks, Richard James . 

Barg, David William . . 

Barkow, Carl William 

Barnes, Eleanor Alice . . 

Barrett, Robert Nicholas, J 

Baumgartner, Inez Mary 

Beahan, Kermit King 

Benckenstein, Charles 

Height, Jr 

Berkhoudt, Lambertus . 
Berry, William Elbert, Jr. 
Bertin, Paul Lucian, Jr. . 
Birath, Elna Thur . . . 

* As classified^October i, 1937. 

[ 193] 



Pasadena, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Massillon, Ohio 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Vinton, Louisiana 
Buffalo, New York 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Bishop, Julius Brown . . . 
Bishop, Marjorie Frances . 
Blanton, Benjamin Franklin 
Bloomfield, Ethel Crane 
Bloomquist, Beatrice 

Margaret 

Boiling, Mary Ellis .... 
Booker, John Winston . . 
Bowie, Thomas Gavin . . 
Brannon, Richard Barclay 
Bransford, Dorothy Mannin 
Bremer, William Edgar, Jr 
Brill, Harry Kale . . . 
Britton, John Claude . . 
Brogniez, Raymond Hector 
Brooks, Joan Margaret 
Brous, Lloyd Knaur . 
Brown, Charles Leonard 
Bryan, Florence Carter 
Bryant, William Batte 
Buchanan, Annie Joe . 
Buchanan, Mary Ellen 
Burnham, Dorothy Alvinee 
Burns, William Rual, Jr. 
Burr, Frances Juanita 
Butler, Donald Bertrand 
Butler, Thomas Robert . 
Cage, Ben Jack .... 
Caraway, William Hodge 
Carney, Jimmy Tobin 
Carter, Joseph John . . 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 
Longview, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Gallon, Ohio 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Denison, Texas 
Gueydon, Louisiana 
Houston, Texas 
Kilgore, Texas 
Dickinson, Texas 
Dickinson, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Refugio, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Longview, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Sugar Land, Texas 
Port A rthur, Texas 
Franklin, Texas 



I 194 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Chandler, William 

Frederick 

Chapman, Frances Louise 
Chenault, William Blewett, 
Chudleigh, Lydia Helen 
Church, Walter Lee, Jr. 
Clark, Houston . . . 
Clark, John Martin, Jr. 
Clark, Raymond Ferris 
Clark, Tyler Thatcher 
Clarkson, Ira Sebring, Jr 
Cleere, Dorothy Fay . 
Cleveland, Allen Rhea 
Collier, Wyatt Newton 
Cookenboo, Betty Jane 
Cordill, Olie James . . 
Cotropia, Sarah . . . 
Cotter, Cornelius William 
Couger, Quincy Mack 
Courtney, Chyde Jasper 
Craddock, Levi Cranford 
Craddock, William Percival 

Creamer, Cleo 

Crenshaw, Alfred Harold 
Crisman, Lewie Ross . . 
Cross, James Arthur, Jr. 
Dattner, Mildred Elizabeth 
Davis, Elisabeth King . . 
Deming, Julius Overrocker 
Dickinson, Richard 

Brookover 



Jr. 



San Antonio, Texas 
Galveston, Texas 
Wellsville, New York 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Carlsbad, New Mexico 
Duncan Field, Texas 
Ennis, Texas 
Ennis, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Big Spring, Texas 
Hearne, Texas 
Dickinson, Texas 
Bunger, Texas 
New Willard, Texas 
Van, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Orange, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Selma, Alabama 
Arlington, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Overton, Texas 

Houston, Texas 



195 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Dimviddie, James Howard 
Dixon, Rolland Eugene . 
Dodd, Charles Gardner . 
Dodge, Corvvin Jernigan 
Dreyer, John Reichert 
Earnest, Joseph Ellison . 
East, Norman Reichert . 
Ebdon, Lurline Wright . 
Eberspacher, Mildred Rose 
Eidman, Frank Gregory 
Elkins, Lawrence Marcus 
Ellington, John Austin 
Elliot, Miriam Claire . 
Emmite, Raymond Fred 
Ernst, Eliot Dowman . 
Ethridge, Martha Alice 
Ferguson, William Frank 
Fink, Robert Deforest 
Fisher, Mary Aline . . 
Fitch, Betty June . . 
Fitzgerald, Ray Munn, II. 
Flewellen, Eugene Holland 
Ford, Milo W., Jr. . . . 
Foster, Juanita Murel 
Foye, Thomas James . . 
Frankie, Joseph, Jr. . . 
Fulton, Thomas Walden 
Gardiner, Henry George, Jr. 



Garrett, Hickman Newton, Jr. Houston, Texas 



Garrison, Lorene . . . 
Gaston, Thomas Green 



Houston, Texas 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 
Omaha, Nebraska 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Brownsville, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Chicago, Illinois 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Coleman, Texas 
Dayton, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Los Fresnos, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Quitaque, Texas 



Houston, Texas 
Shreveport, Louisiana 

[l 9 6] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Gay, Frances Katherine 
Geiselman, Wenzel Joseph 
Geldert, William John 
Gerber, Miriam Esther 
Gibson, Hugh, II. . . 
Gigliotti, Flora Delfina 
Gillingham, Robert . . 
Glass, Thomas Franklin, Jr. 
Glassie, John Earl, Jr. . . 
Gooch, Frank Branch, Jr. . 
Goodson, Albert Adams, Jr. 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Uniontown, Alabama 
Refugio, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Piano, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



Granger, Dorothy Mae . 

Green, J. R Houston, Texas 

Guernsey, Frank Drummond, 

Jr Orlando, Florida 

Guerra, Homero Edinburg, Texas 



Hager, Donald Rupert . . 
Haner, William Woodrow . 
Hanna, Richard Taylor, Jr. 
Hanszen, Eugene Whitman 
Hardwick, George King . . 
Harrington, Margaret Ruby 
Harris, Doris . . . 
Harris, Thais . . . 
Haynes, Audrey Alva 
Heard, John Francis 
Hedrick, Florence . 
Helton, John Burke 
Henslee, Jess Elbert 
Hernandez, John Emanuel 
Herndon, Henry Clay 



Crockett, Texas 
Skellytown, Texas 
Brownwood, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Refugio, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Beaumont, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



[ 197 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Hess, Carl Milton Houston, Texas 

Heyne, Emeronce Murentine . Houston, Texas 

Hill, Elizabeth Lee Houston, Texas 

Hill, George Russell, Jr. . . Houston, Texas 

Hines, Jess Willard Simsboro, Louisiana 

Hirdler, Louis C Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Hoencke, Wanda Louise . . Houston, Texas 

Holleman, Bessie Louise . . Houston, Texas 

Holt, Orren A Houston, Texas 



Horner, Vincent Carl . . 
Howard, Betty Ann . . 
Howard, Roy Emerson, Jr. 
Hudspeth, Chalmers Mac 
Hunter, Ina Fae .... 
Hunter, Lela Mae . . . 
Hurd, Charles Wesley 
Husbands, Howell Herbert, 
Jackson, Guy William 
Jacobs, Sadye Rose 
Jahn, Charles Birks 
Jamison, Leah Louise 
Joekel, Annie Marie 
John, George Lloyd 
Johnson, Chrest 

Bernhardt, Jr. . . 
Johnson, Karl Duggan 
Johnston, David . . 
Johs, Albert .... 
Jones, Alice Elizabeth 
Jones, Mary Ann 
Jones, William Ivan 



,Jr. 



. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Arlington, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Wichita Falls, Texas 

Jr. Greenville, Texas 

. San Antonio, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Aztec, New Mexico 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Laramie, Wyoming 

. Houston, Texas 

. Asheville, North Carolina 

. Fort Worth, Texas 

. Palacios, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Hedley, Texas 

I 9 8] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Katz, Charles Julius .... San Antonio, Texas 

Keep, Harry Augustus . . . Dallas, Texas 

Kelley, Mary Elisabeth . . . Houston, Texas 

Kennedy, Mary Ellen . . . Carlisle, Texas 

Kennedy, Thomas Lincoln . Houston, Texas 

Kent, Donald Deady .... Genoa, Texas 

King, Carey Gray, Jr. ... Dallas, Texas 

Klindworth, Kenneth George. Saint Albans, New York 

Korinek, Helen Emmily . . Houston, Texas 

Krahl, Jane Louise Houston, Texas 

Kunover, Matilda Houston, Texas 

LaGrone, Max Huel .... Port Arthur, Texas 

Laichinger, Paul, Jr Dallas, Texas 

Lain, Ernest Herchel .... Humble, Texas 

Lang, Irving Galveston, Texas 

Lehmann, Dorothy Elizabeth Houston, Texas 

Leonard, Leslie Thain . . . Houston, Texas 

Lillard, James Gerard . . . Kaufman, Texas 

Long, Frank Albert .... Bastrop, Texas 

Longnecker, Richard Reed . Houston, Texas 

McBrayer, Ross Erwin . . . San Antonio, Texas 

McCants, Robert Preston . . Houston, Texas 

McCardell, Margaret Kenan . Houston, Texas 

McCord, David Robert . . . Dallas, Texas 

McDonald, Charles Rust . . Galveston, Texas 

McKee, Robert Alexander . . Lake Charles, Louisiana 

McMillan, Alton Lewis . . . Houston, Texas 

Maer, Claude McCabe, Jr. . Fort Worth, Texas 

Makeig, Daniel Clare, Jr. . . Houston, Texas 

Malich, Charles Wilson . . . Somerville, Texas 

Malone, William Chapman, Jr. Houston, Texas 

I 199] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Mandell, James Ford . . 
Mansell, Marvin Enoch . 
Maroney, Jane Margaret 
Marsh, Amos Osborne, Jr. 
Marshall, Robert Wilson 
Mattiza, Dick Seale . . 
Maudlin, Fred Thomas, Jr 
Mayo, Edward Burnett . 
Mercer, William Rambeau 
Meyer, Joseph Francis . 
Middleton, Eric Edwin . 
Miller, Addis Marion . . 
Miller, Frederick Eugene 
Miller, George Van Zandt 
Miller, Robert Joshua 
Mills, William Cecil, Jr. 
Mitchell, Jordan Holsey, Jr 
Mohr, Bonnie Elloise . . 
Mohrmann, Wiley Cooper 
Moncrief, Jack Basil, Jr. 
Monks, William Reid, Jr. 

Moody, Dan M 

Mooney, John Rayburn . 
Mooney, Lillian Maxine 
Morgan, Velma Carolyn 
Morgan, Worster Miles . 
Moser, Willard William, Jr 
Motes-Conners, Corroll 

Julius 

Mowery, Irl Holden, Jr. 
Murphy, Paul Cowley . 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Monterrey, Mexico 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Big Spring, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Caldwell, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Luling, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Abilene, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Oakdale, Louisiana 



200 ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Murphy, Robert Joseph 
Murphy, William Maston, 
Myers, Barbara Maxine 
Nagai, Gladyes Masao . 
Nathan, Charles Carb 
Newsome, Norman, Jr. . 
Nobles, Andy Franklin . 
Nolen, Helen Frances . . 
Norris, Helen Marie . . 
Oleson, Frederick Christen 
Olin, Walter George . . 
Orman, Kenneth .... 
Palisson, Marcelle Suzanne 
Palmer, Charles Alfred . 
Palmer, Harold Henry . 
Pappas, Argero Efstratios 
Parish, Walter Alvis, Jr. 
Parsons, Mildred Aleene 
Peet, Nick Peter .... 
Peters, Marjorie Virginia 
Phillips, Earl Bill . . . 
Player, Thomson 

Trezevant, Jr 

Polk, Samuel Clarence . 
Pratt, Nancy Jane . . . 
Prior, Charles Gassier 
Ramin, Lorena .... 
Raymond, Mary Margaret 
Reed, Kelly Bruce . . . 
Reese, Earle Bayne . . 
Reitz, Floyd Gilliam . . 



. Beaumont, Texas 

Jr. Nursery, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Almeda, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Thornton, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. La Porte, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Kilgore, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 



. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. New York, New York 
. Palestine, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Denison, Texas 
. Grove ton, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 



[201 ] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Richardson, James Robert, Jr. Houston, Texas 



Richardson, Ruth Lurline 
Rieger, Billy Tom . . . 
Robb, William Gorenflo . 
Robertus, Ellen Jeannette 
Robinowitz, Eli .... 
Rodgers, Walter Crutcher 

Leroy, Jr 

Rote, Jean Jacquies . . 
Rudy, Moses Maimon 
Russell, Jack Robinson . 
Ryman, Barbara Allen . 
Sale, Joseph Archie . . . 

Samfield, Max 

Sartor, Albin Francis, Jr. 
Satterfield, Edwinna . . 
Saunders, David Houston 
Sawyer, Audrey Arvin 
Scarborough, Frances . . 
Schmidt, Jessie Bell . . 
Schmitt, Mary Jane . . 
Scott, Anthony Graham 
Scott, Walter Jarratt . . 



Shackelford, Marshall DuBose Waxahachie, Texas 



Shapley, Irving James 
Shindler, Katie Belle . . 
Sikes, Weldon Drake . . 
Sinclair, Marian .... 
Singletary, Edward Lee . 
Sledge, Marion Amelia . 
Smith, Brooke Blackburn 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Rosenberg, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Hereford, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Port Arthur, Texas 
Bartlett, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Corpus Christi, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Wichita Falls, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



[ 202 ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Smith, Bruce Monarch . 
Smith, Gilson Ruttan . . 
Smith, John Treanor . . 
Snyder, Maryellen . . . 
Solomonson, Sidney Pike 
Soper, Donald Cox . . . 
Sorsby, William Frederick 
Spaw, Louis David . . . 

Spikes, George 

Standefer, Billy .... 
Steele, Elizabeth .... 
Steitz, Alfred, Jr. ... 
Stephen, Violet Elizabeth 
Stevenson, Ruth .... 
Stewart, Willis Taylor, Jr. 
Suhler, William Henry . 
Sullender, Maurice Carrol 
Sullivan, Charles Fitzsimon 
Sumners, Robert William 
Talbert, John Winfred . 
Tatum, George Liston, Jr. 
Taylor, Frank Eckford . 
Taylor, Harris LeRoy 
Taylor, Julia Pease . . . 
Taylor, Katherine Beatrice 
Taylor, William Walter . 
Thomen, George Harry . 
Thompson, Eunice La Rue 
Tucker, Lee O 'Hegar . . 
Turner, Ancil Pierce . . 
Turner, Jack Marston 



. La Feria, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Dallas, Texas 
. Eldora, Iowa 
. Hempstead, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Beeville, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Tulsa, Oklahoma 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Lexington, Kentucky 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Corsicana, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Bay town, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Palestine, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Orange, Texas 
. Newgulf, Texas 
. Galveston, Texas 
. Jasper, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 

203] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Umland, Alan Werner . . . 
Van Pelt, Dwight Edison, Jr. 
Van Vorst, William David 
Vestal, Jack Harvey . . 
Wallis, Fred Moon . . . 
Walters, John Ogden . . 
Watkin, William Ward, Jr. 
Webre, John Friend . . 
Weeden, Erlene Dorothy 
Weismann, Doris Estelle 
Wheeler, Thomas Marion 
White, Thomas Jefferson 
Whitlow, Kenneth Moody 
Wier, Thomas Percy, Jr. 
Williams, Howard Kenneth 
Williams, Virginia Leoma 
Williams, Walter Hugh . 
Wilson, Albert George 
Wilson, Jack Neville . . 
Wimberly, Ted B. . . . 
Wisenberg, Ruth Miriam 
Witherspoon, Horace 

Trabue, Jr 

Wommack, Robert Gross 
Wood, Charles Raymond 
Wood, William Avey . . 
Woodring, Carl Ray . . 
Wootton, Leonard Luther 
Wynn, Robert Otis . . . 
Young, Jack Carroll . . 
Young, John Louis . . . 



Waller, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Denison, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Cameron, Texas 
Wichita Falls, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Harlingen, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Belle Fourche, South Dakota 
Corpus Christi, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Newgulf, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



[204] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



FRESHMEN* 

Alsworth, Charles Calhoun . Houston, Texas 
Angell, Burt Thorning . . . Houston, Texas 
Archer, Barbara Louise . . . Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
Arthur, John Kenneth Stuart. Dallas, Texas 



Atlas, Leon Trotzky . . 
Austin, Walter James, Jr 
Averill, Mary Catherine 

Bacon, Carl 

Bains, Robert Reese, Jr. 
Baird, Hoyt Vernon . . 
Baker, Norvil Arnold . . 

Bannon, A. J 

Barabash, Elsie Juanita . 
Bartholomew, Charles Kane 
Bartlett, Brady, II . . . 
Bartmess, Thomas Edgar 
Baskett, Judson Boyce . 
Bass, Frances Eva . . . 
Bassett, Livy Gardner 
Baumgartner, Eleanor Alice 
Beck, Morgan Gregory . 
Behr, Sarah Anne . . . 
Bellegie, Nicholas Joseph 
Berry, Bennie Nanette . 
Berry, Frances Lee . . . 

Beyer, Alvin, Jr 

Bickel, Robert Erwin . . 
Biossat, Judy Ellen . . 
*As classified October i, 1937. 



Houston, Texas 
Chicago, Illinois 
Houston, Texas 
Vernon, Texas 
Bay town, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
College Station, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Huntington, New York 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Brenham, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Caldwell, Idaho 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
San Benito, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



[205] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Bishop, Frances Lansden 

Black, Hugh Cleon . . . 

Blagg, Joe Wilmeth . . 

Blair, Allen Homer . . . 

Blake, LaFayette L., Jr. 

Blouin, Glenn Morgan 

Bock, Paul Richard . . 

Boesch, Frederick Joseph, Jr. Fort Worth, Texas 

Bogar, Margaret Catherine . Houston, Texas 

Bogard, Carl Robert . 



Houston, Texas 
Childress, Texas 
Brownwood, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Overton, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Cunningham, Kansas 



Boggs, Nancy Beth 
Bolton, Walter Wildee 
Boy, George Herman . 
Boyd, Margery Maude 
Boyer, John Leslie . . 
Braden, Mary Kathleen 
Brandon, Robert Loren . 
Bratten, Thomas Obadiah 
Bratton, Theodore DuBose 
Breit, Cathryn Aileen 
Brewer, Gerald Averitt 
Bronson, Roy Bernard, Jr. 
Brooke, Richard CoorPender 
Brugger, Doris Grace . . 
Buchanan, Ruth Patricia 
Buescher, James Elmer 
Bugge, Harold Alfred . 
Burgess, Charles, Jr. . 
Burklin, William Boyd 
Burr, Charlotte Hulene 
Buster, Alan A. . . . 



Houston, Texas 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Beaumont, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Palestine, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Houston, Texas 
Vernon, Texas 
Luting, Texas 
Rosita, Coahuila, Mexico 
BellviUe, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Refugio, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



206 ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Butler, Elizabeth . . . 
Bybee, Paul Davidson, Jr. 
Cain, Leonard William . 
Cain, Sybil Blanche . . 
Caldwell, Arnold Raymond 
Caiman, Anthony, Jr. 
Calvert, Thomas William 
Caplan, Milton Zelig . . 
Capps, Lee Wesley, Jr. . 
Carini, William Cullen . 
Carothers, Campbell 

Marmion 

Carr, Charlotte Anne . . 
Carr, Louis Patrick . . 
Carstarphen, Chapel Price 
Carswell, Frank Willis . 
Carter, Ann Elizabeth 
Cashion, Joe James . . 
Cashman, Catherine 

Virginia 

Cassell, George Louis . . 
Casten, James William . 
Cater, James William . . 
Chan, Charles Soon . . 
Chandler, Berry .... 
Chandler, Robert Lewis . 
Cheney, Monroe George, J 
Clark, John Lyman, Jr. . 
Clark, Stanley Thomas . 
Cline, George William 
Coddou, Charles Alexzander 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Framingham, Massachusetts 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Texarkana, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Buffalo, New York 
Waller, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Coleman, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Lake Charles, Louisiana 
Houston, Texas 



207 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Coffee, Horace Bailey . . . Vernon, Texas 

Collette, Allan, Jr Houston, Texas 

Colley, O. L., Jr Mount Pleasant, Texas 

Coman, James Groesbeck, Jr. Mexia, Texas 
Compere, Thomas 

Hechigee, Jr Houston, Texas 

Conway, Carolyn Houston, Texas 

Cookenboo, Daisy Louise . . La Porte, Texas 

Cooksey, Hazel Earle .... Houston, Texas 

Cowling, Vincent Frederick . Mount Carmel, Illinois 

Craddock, James Hartwell . Houston, Texas 

Cratin, John Rogers, Jr. . . Houston, Texas 

Crissman, Harry U Dallas, Texas 

Cubberly, Walter 

Elsworth, Jr Houston, Texas 

Cuenod, Harriet Claire . . . Houston, Texas 

Cullen, Jane Houston, Texas 

Cunningham, Martha Marie . Wheeling, West Virginia 

Dace, Wallace Edwin .... Corpus Christi, Texas 

Dailey, Dorris Evelyn . . . Houston, Texas 

David, Alice Marie Houston, Texas 

Davidson, Earl Jim .... Houston, Texas 

Davis, Lloyd Kenady .... Houston, Texas 

Denney, George Hurdle . . . Como, Texas 

Diemer, Joseph Allan .... Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Diener, Milton Lawrence . . Houston, Texas 

Dobelman, Gerard August . Houston, Texas 

Dohrman, Wayne Albert . . Pasadena, Texas 

Duff, Bedford King .... Galveston, Texas 

Duvall, Robert Palestine, Texas 

Dvorak, James Walter . . . Houston, Texas 

[ 208 ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Earhart, Mary Aline . . 
Earle, Kenneth Martin . 
Easley, Sara Estelle . . 
Ehrhardt, Charles David, 
Elizalde, Pullman Harry 
Elliott, Frederic Bard 
English, Florence Annah 
Eschenfelder, Willie Alfred 
Evans, Charles Caswallon 
Fairchild, John Arthur . 
Farnsworth, David Edwin 
Feser, Robert Philip . . 
Fiorilla, Florence Marie . 
Flowers, Samuel Coit . . 
Floyd, Marion Albert . . 
Ford, Frank Goss . . . 
Fowler, Robert Edward . 
Frachtman, Henryetta 

Natalie 

Freeman, Ivan Antone 
Freeman, John Clinton, Jr. 
Frost, Marion Settegast . 
Fry, Edward Wilson . . 
Fulks, Marjorie Louise 
Gage, John Rollins . . . 
Gartner, Betty Marian 

Gayle, Fannie 

Gerland, Albert Benjamin 
Gill, Harry William . . 
Gillespie, Warren, Jr. . . 
Gillis, Stanley Stuart . . 



. Houston, Texas 

. Jacksonville, Texas 

. Dublin, Texas 

Jr. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Big Spring, Texas 

. Wink, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Dallas, Texas 



. Houston, Texas 

. Mexia, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Marshall, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Port Gibson, Mississippi 

. Houston, Texas 

. East Columbia, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 



[ 209] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Girard, Louis Joseph . . 
Glander, Raymond . . . 
Glover, Donald H. . . . 
Goforth, Charles Drinkard, 
Gomez, Placido Anthony 
Good, James Othniel, Jr. 
Grady, Kathleen Lavona 
Green, Durwood Stokes . 
Green, Warren Clyde . . 
Griffith, William Frank, Jr 
Groff, Archie Edward . . 
Haberlie, Douglas Eugene 
Haggard, Eugene . . . 
Hale, Herman, Jr. . . . 
Hander, Otto Benjamin . 
Hannon, Marietta Clare 
Hardeman, Edward Spence 
Harding, Eugene Irvan, Jr. 
Hardy, Claude Mayfield 
Hargrove, Mildred . . 
Harmon, Julian Warren, Jr 
Hartman, Fred Libburn 
Haywood, Dexter Dame, J 
Heard, Jack Flewellen 
Heard, William Joseph 
Heidler, Gilbert Lee 
Helton, Mary Patricia 
Helwig, Harry Warren 
Henicle, Glenn Robert 
Herbrig, LeeRoy . . . 
Hiegel, Howard Harrell 



Jr. 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Port A rthur, Texas 
Overton, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Horatio, Arkansas 
Houston, Texas 
Rosita, Coahuila, Mexico 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
H otis ton, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Waco, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Beaumont, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Cleburne, Texas 
Texarkana, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Sweeny, Texas 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 



210 ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Highsmith, Claud Edwin 
Hilborn, William Dwight 
Hinkle, George Shepherd 
Hogge, Marjorie Olga 
Holloway, Edward King 
Holmes, Dorothy 
Holstein, Tom, Jr. . 
Holt, Anne Frances 
Holt, Harry Lewis . 
Holt, Marjorie Cary 
Holt, Wayne Clifton 
Hood, Francis T. Nicholas, 
Horn, Clinton Richard . 
Horridge, John Henry 
Houlihan, Robert Emmett 
Howard, Georgia Grainger 
Hunt, Robert Estes . . 
Inglis, James Bernard 
Ivey, James Monroe, Jr. 
Jackson, Flora Olivia . . 
Jacobe, Russel Lloyd, Jr. 
Jameson, Betsey Jane 
Jenkins, Carden Lamar . 
Jockusch, John Sealy . . 
John, Patricia Spaulding 
Johnson, Thomas Robert, 
Johnston, Mary Elizabeth 
Jones, Carl Owen . . . 
Jones, Emzy Theodore, Jr. 
Jones, Gloria Belle . . . 
Jones, Howard Ayton 

[ 



. Corpus Christi, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Como, Mississippi 

. Houston, Texas 

. La Ward, Texas 

, Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Breckenridge, Texas 
Jr. Piano, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. West Point, New York 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Shreveport, Louisiana 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Galveston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 
Jr. Elk City, Oklahoma 

. Houston, Texas 

. Wichita, Kansas 

. Bartlett, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Greenville, Texas 

211 ] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Jones, Maurice Charles . 
Jordan, Walter Mark, Jr. 
Kaiser, Henry Kemper . 
Kandeler, Erwin Whitney, 
Kane, Mary Frances . . 
Karchmer, Libby Hortense 
Keating, Edith Mary . . 
Keenan, William Howard 
Keever, Kathryne . . . 
Keneaster, Kenneth King 
Kerr, Yveline Louise . . 
Kiker, Helen Jean . . . 
King, Morton Crawford 
Kinzy, Thomas Milford . 
Kirtland, Theodore Dwighl 

Kishi, George 

Kjorlaug, Clark Regal 
Kleiber, Leo Paul . . . 
Kohen, Samuel Isadore . 
Koneman, Norman Albert, 
Kopecky, Joseph Willis . 
Kunetka, Louis .... 
Ladig, Kenneth Otto . . 
Lanclos, Albert Francis, Jr 
Landin, Kenneth Alvin . 
Lang, Donald Alexander 
LaPrade, Robert Maitland 
Lawler, Arthur O., Jr. 
Lawrence, Frederick Cecil 
Lehmann, Charlotte Janice 
Leigh, Jane Procter . . . 

[ 



Houston, Texas 
Nacogdoches, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Jr. Houston, Texas 
. Galveston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Quitaque, Texas 
. Pearland, Texas 
. Corpus Christi, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Gallon, Ohio 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Dallas, Texas 
Jr. Houston, Texas 
. San Antonio, Texas 
. Sweet Home, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Sugar Land, Texas 
. Port Arthur, Texas 
. Gregory, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. . Houston, Texas 

212 ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Leonard, Lucille Rose 
Lester, Joseph Hendrick 
Lewis, Harold Jean . . . 
Liese, Billie Virginia . . 
Liljestrand, Stanley Earle 
Lindsey, Mary Jeanette 
Linenberger, Gustave 

Aaron, Jr 

Loeffler, John Edward, Jr. 
Long, Erin Patricia . . 
Love, Lucy Lillian . . . 
Love, Robert Marshall . 
Luce, Vera Estelle . . . 
McAshan, Mary Celeste 
McCarty, Douglas Laverne 
McClain, Rufus Fount . 
McConnell, Olga Orline . 
McCue, Joseph Bloomfield 
McGarahan, William Patrick. 
McGinty, Bradford Burke . . 
Mclntyre, Grace Ellen . . . 
McKay, Sam Chester, Jr. . . 
McLamore, William Merrill . 
MacGregor, Kathleen Strong . 
Maida, Antoinette Teresa . . 
Mandeville, Charles Earle . . 
Mansfeld, Johanna Katherine 
Marshall, Robert Gerald . . 
Martin, George Edward . . 
Mast, Burton Thompson . . 
Masterson, Horace Thomson . 



Houston, Texas 
West Columbia, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Weslaco, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Camp Ruby, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Saint Louis, Missouri 
Yoakum, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Shreveport, Louisiana 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 



[213] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Matlack, Levi Charles . . 
Matthews, Charles Sedwick 
Mattingly, Francis Edward 
Meerscheidt, Leo Paul, Jr. 
Meyer, Vaughan Benjamin 
Miller, Georgia Gertrude 
Miller, James Nathaniel 
Miller, James Pinckney . 
Miller, Townsend . . . 
Millis, Hugh Wellington 

Minton, Ruth 

Mitchell, Edward Leonard 
Moeller, Marjorie Emeline 
Monroe, Kirby Dayle . . 
Montgomery, Emily 

Katharine 

Mooney, John Prendergast 
Moore, Wilfred Collin . . 
Morris, John Warren . . . 
Moser, Edmund Andrew, Jr. 

Moser, Ray 

Moskowitz, Shirley Edith . 
Muecke, Wesley Marvin 

Henry John Von, Jr. . . 
Muller, Helen Johanna 

Elizabeth 

Murphree, Harold Edwin, J 
Myres, Charles Ernest . . 

Nachlas, Sidney 

Nelson, Mary Evelyn . . . 
Neyland, Thomas Ross . . 



. Basil, Kansas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Ingleside, Texas 

. San Antonio, Texas 

. Eagle Pass, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Denison, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Gainesville, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. San Antonio, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Havre de Grace, Maryland 

. Houston, Texas 

. Ranger, Texas 

. Corpus Christi, Texas 

. Winter Park, Florida 

. Houston, Texas 

. Abilene, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Seabrook, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

r. Houston, Texas 

. El Paso, Texas 

. Houston, Texas 

. Orange, Texas 

. Fort Worth, Texas 



[214] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



11 



Jr 



Ng, Ella Marie .... 

Nichols, Joan 

Nicholson, Patrick James 
Nordin, Obert Layne . . 

Norris, Madge 

Norton, Nan Alsup . . . 
Nystrom, Keith Stanley 
Obenvetter, Manro Turnbu 
Oldham, Oliver Gordon . 
Orvis, Byron LeRoy, Jr. 
Overland, Austin William, 
Owens, James Beverly 
Palmer, Fred Anthony . 
Palmer, Guernsey Aaron, Jr 
Palmer, Paul Augustus . 
Parchman, John B. . . . 
Parsons, Marjorie Maxine 
Payne, William K. . . . 

Peddy, J. B 

Peden, Norman Hoggatt 
Pendarvis, Frances 

Marguerite 

Pepper, Fred Woodrow . 
Perkins, Josephine Lloyd 
Perkins, Margaret Virginia 
Perkins, Robert Browning 
Petrie, Mary Elizabeth . 
Phillips, William Fred 
Picton, Lida Means . . 
Pike, Dorothy Isabell . . 
Pincoffs, Edmund Lloyd 

[21 



Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Sinton, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
La Porte, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Welsh, Louisiana 
Silsbee, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Bay town, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Shreveport, Louisiana 
Clarksville, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Vaughan, Mississippi 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

5] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Pope, Charlotte Anne 
Pounds, Hortense . . . 
Powell, Alfred Davis . . 
Powell, Leah MacAllen . 
Prescott, Armstrong 

de Rouhlac 

Procter, Neely Laura . . 
Ragland, William Andrew, 
Rasch, Arnan Albert . . 
Rector, James Knight 
Reilly, Lawrence Joseph 
Renner, Eugene Albert . 
Reynaud, Adair Wynne . 
Richardson, Elmer Winston 
Rick, Jack Harding . . 
Robbins, William . . . 
Roberts, Charles Jesse 
Roberts, Eddie Davis . . 
Romero, Clarence Edwin 
Rosenbloom, Jerome Lee 
Roser, Louise Beraud . . 
Ross, Billy Earl .... 
Ross, Nealie Edward, Jr. 
Rumbel, Keith Ellis . . 
Rush, Lawrence Marvin 
St. John, Henry Hallam 
Salisbury, Guy Freemont 
Sanders, John Thomas, III 
Sandifer, John Seay, Jr. . 
Sandlin, Gary Lockwood 
Sanger, Joseph Lehman . 



Jr 



Houston, Texas 
Avondale Estates, Georgia 
Houston, Texas 
Bastrop, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Germantown, Tennessee 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Bay town, Texas 
Camden, New Jersey 
Houston, Texas 
Butler, Pennsylvania 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Welsh, Louisiana 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Mission, Texas 
Hubbard, Texas 
Temple, Texas 
Alpine, Texas 
Mexia, Texas 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Kirbyville, Texas 
Dallas, Texas 



[216] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Schaffer, Eli Rosenberg, Texas 

Scheps, Charles Houston, Texas 

Schiller, Margaret Ellen . . Houston, Texas 

Schulenburg, Edward .... Houston, Texas 

Schulz, Edward Bruno, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

Schumacher, Inez Elaine . . Houston, Texas 

Schutte, Lawrence Eades . . Houston, Texas 

Scrimgeour, Barbara .... Galveston, Texas 

Scruggs, Dorothy Marguerite. Houston, Texas 

Scruggs, Willard Ray, Jr. . . Houston, Texas 

Seaman, Edward Fred, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

Seliger, Maurice Longview, Texas 

Selman, Bert Dale Houston, Texas 

Sharpe, Linus George .... Buffalo, New York 

Sheinberg, Haskell Houston, Texas 

Sher, Bernice Eleanor . . . Houston, Texas 

Simpson, Charles Duncan, Jr. Houston, Texas 

Simpson, Warren Candler . . Paris, Texas 

Sims, Betty Jane Houston, Texas 

Sims, Eugenia Maude Morse . Houston, Texas 

Sims, William Robert, Jr. . . Houston, Texas 

Sloan, Frank Buck Breckenridge, Texas 

Slomovitz, Evelyn Houston, Texas 

Smith, Ben W., Jr Houston, Texas 

Smith, Harry David .... Houston, Texas 

Smith, Marshall Bryan . . . Houston, Texas 

Smith, Martha Clark .... Fairbanks, Texas 

Smith, Robert White .... Eufaula, Oklahoma 

Smith, Youel Curtis, Jr. . . Houston, Texas 

Snyder, Warren George . . . Houston, Texas 

Sparkman, Ben Joseph, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

[ 217] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 



Staley, Joe Franklin . . 
Stamey, Charles Morgan 
Stamey, Roderick 

Alexander, Jr 

Steakley, Isaac Albert 
Steck, John Walter . . . 
Stephenson, Sarah 

Jeannette 

Sterling, Thomas Rudolph 
Stevens, Hugh Eugene . 
Stone, Annie Laura . . 
Stone, Joseph Webster . 
Storm, Martha Joanne . 
Stuart, Dock Arteak . . 
Sullivan, Helen Claire 
Sutton, Cecil Charles . . 
Swartz, Zylla Alcinda . . 
Symonds, Walter Stout, Jr 

Talley, H. A 

Taulbee, George Custer . 
Taylor, Herman Samuel 
Tenery, George Robert . 
Tennant, James Paschal 
Terry, Clyde Connelly 
Thomas, James Blair . . 
Thompson, Willard Abijah 
Thurston, Howard Forest 
Timmins, Christian Goos 
Tipton, James Douglas . 
Trantham, Walter Earl, Jr 
Tunstall, Jeanne Cecile . 



Cleburne, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Port Arthur, Texas 

Houston, Texas 
Bay City, Texas 
Cleburne, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Texarkana, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Taylor, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 
Gainesville, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Texas City, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Mineral Wells, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Houston, Texas 
Bethel, Maine 
Houston, Texas 
Nacogdoches, Texas 
Mc Allen, Texas 
Houston, Texas 



[218] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Turney, Billy Walter . 
Vander Henst, Jan, Jr. 
Van Pelt, Gloria . . . 
Vestal, Richard Horace 
Vogt, Ernest Lee, Jr. . 
Voulgaris, Dennis Michael 
Waddell, Hugh Kerr, II 

Wagner, Reta 

Walker, Hugh Alexander, Jr 
Walker, Lillian .... 
Wallace, Rosemary . . . 
Wappler, Frank Alvin 
Watkins, Mary Elizabeth 
Watson, Bennett Blake . 
Watson, Lloyd Nathan . 
Webb, Clarence Russell, Jr 
Webster, Robert Allen, Jr 
Welsh, Tom Christopher, Jr 
Whalen, John .... 
Whatley, Billie Bess . 
Whatley, Everett Cavett, Jr 
White, Roland Livesay 
Wicklund, Harold Pershing 
Williams, Evelyn Louise 
Williams, Francis Baker 
Wilson, Bertram Albert . 
Wise, Bernard Israel . . 
Wisenberg, Avrohm Isaac 
Wohlt, William Frederick 
Wolcott, Fred W., Jr. . 
Wood, Harry David . . 



. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Crockett, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Palestine, Texas 
. Texarkana, Arkansas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. San Angelo, Texas 
. Clyde, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Ro swell, New Mexico 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Houston, Texas 
. Snyder, Texas 
. El Paso, Texas 



219] 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

Wood, Joseph Perry .... Houston, Texas 

Woodburn, James Corydon . Beaumont, Texas 

Woodson, Clinton Eldon, Jr. . Cleveland, Texas 

Wootters, Leon Blum .... San Antonio, Texas 

Wright, Marion Starnes, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

Wylie, Earl Henderson, Texas 

Wylie, Oran Lee, Jr Houston, Texas 

Yates, Walter Preston, Jr. . . Forney, Texas 

Yeager, Rosemary Catherine . Houston, Texas 

Yellin, Harold Houston, Texas 

Young, Joseph Everett, Jr. . Houston, Texas 

Young, Robert James . . . Houston, Texas 

Zagst, Robert Edward . . . Houston, Texas 

Zumwalt, Frank Edgar . . . Houston, Texas 



220 | 



INDEX 



Academic Course, 42 
Administration, Officers, 6 
Admission, 35 
Adviser to Women, 42 
Applied Mathematics, 65 
Architecture 

Admission, 35 

Courses, 123 

Equipment, 144 
Architecture of the Insti- 
tute, 9 
Assistants and Fellows, 21 
Athletics, 95 
Autry House, 155 
Biology 

Courses, 79 

Laboratory, 144 
Board and Lodging, 41 
Buildings, 9, 139 
Business Administration, 86 
Calendar, 3 
Certificate 

Admission by, 35 

Teachers, 89 
Chemical Engineering 

Admission, 35 

Courses, 100, 120 



Laboratories, II, 141 
Chemistry 

Courses, 69 

Laboratories, II, 141 
Christian Associations, 154 
Civil Engineering 

Admission, 35 

Courses, 100, 116 

Laboratory, 145 
Classes, 177 
Cohen House, Robert and 

Agnes, 156 
Commemorative Volumes, 

12, 131 
Commencement, 157 
Courses 

Academic, 42, 53 

Architecture, 42, 123 

Engineering, 42, 49, 100, 

Graduate, 43 

Honours, 43, 46 
Degrees, 42, 97, 100, 123, 

159 
Deposit, 40 
Dormitories, 41 
Economics, 85 
Education, 88 



[221 ] 



INDEX 



Electrical Engineering 

Admission, 35 

Courses, 100, 113 

Laboratory, 146 
Endowment, 8 
Engineering, 100, 103 
Engineering Society, 155 
English, 53 

Entrance Requirements, 35 
Ethics, 94 
Examinations 

Entrance, 38 

Physical, 96 

Scholastic, 50 
Expenses, 39, 96 
Extension Lectures, 129 
Faculty, 13 

Fees and Expenses, 39, 96 
Fellows, 21 
Fellowships, 32 

S. F. Carter Memorial, 33, 
168 

W. B. Sharp Memorial, 33 
Formal Opening, 1 1 
Founder, 7 
French, 56 
Freshman Class, 205 
Funds 

Jordan Memorial, 30 

Owen Wister Literary So- 
ciety, 30 

[ 222 ] 



Richardson Memorial, 30 
W. B. Sharp Memorial, 33 
Sara Stratford, 31 
Elliott Memorial Loan, 31 
169 

Geology, 120 

German, 58 

Grades, Meaning of, 51 

Graduate Courses, 42 

Graduate Students, 173 

Graduates, 159 

Historical Sketch, 7 

History, 90 

Honours Courses, 46 

Inaugural Lectures, 12 

Italian, 59 

Junior Class, 184 

Jurisprudence, 93 

Kinematics, 109 

Laboratories 

Architecture, 144 
Biology, 144 
Chemistry, 11, 141 
Civil Engineering, 145 
Electrical Engineering, 

146 
Engineering Drawing, 145 
Machine Shop, 152 
Mechanical Engineering, 

149 
Physics, 10, 139 



INDEX 



Laboratories (Continued) 

Psychology, 144 
Lectures, Extension, 129 
Lectureship, 

Godwin, 130 

On Music, 130 

Sharp, 130 
Library, 132 
Literary Societies, 154 
Logic, 94 

Machine Shop, 152 
Mathematics 

Applied, 65 

Pure, 61 
Mechanical Engineering 

Admission, 35 

Courses, 100, 109 

Laboratories, 149 
Mechanics, 108 
Name, The, 7 
Organizations, 154 
Pamphlet, 131 
Petroleum Engineering, 69, 

103 
Phi Beta Kappa, 34 
Philanthropy 

Courses, 95 

Sharp Lectureship, 130 
Philosophy, 94 
Physical Education 

Courses, 97 



Physical Training, 95 

Physics 

Courses, 65 
Laboratories, 10, 139 

Premedical Course, 83 

Prizes 

Lady Geddes, 29, 168 
Robert Pilcher Quin Me- 
morial, 32 

Probation, 51 

Psychology, 84 

Publications, 12, 131, 154 

Requirements for Admis- 
sion, 35 

Residential Halls, 41 

Residential Requirement, 41 

Scholarship, Standing in, 49 

Scholarships 

Chapman-Bryan, 28 
Daniel Ripley, 25, 167 
Daughters of American 

Revolution, 24, 167 
Dickson, 27, 168 
Edith Ripley, 26, 168 
Elizabeth Baldwin Lit- 
erary Society 24, 167 
Ellen Axson Wilson, 24, 

167 
Friends of Rice, 28, 168 
Graham Baker Student- 
ship, 23, 166 



[223] 



INDEX 



Scholarships (Continued) 
Hohenthal, 23, 166 
Junior Engineering, 26, 167 
Katie B. Howard, 29 
Lady Washington Texas 

Centennial Award, 29 
Mary Parker Gieseke, 27, 

168 
Pallas Athene Literary 

Society, 25, 167 
Traveling, in Architecture, 
27 
Self-help, 35 
Senior Class, 177 
Shop Work, no, 152 
Sigma Xi, Society of, 34 
Societies, 154 



Sociology, 86 
Sophomore Class, 193 
Spanish, 60 

Students Association, 39, 155 
Students Association Fees, 39 
Student Government, 155 
Students, List of, 171 
Subjects of Instruction, 53, 

98, 103, 124 
Surveying, Plane, 108 
Teachers' Certificates, 89 
Torsion Balance, 141 
Trustees, 1, 8 

Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, 154 
Young Women's Christian 
Association, 154 



[224]